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  • Linksa
    pas cher La Femme Prom Dresses Seattle Seahawks Jerseys Montreal Canadiens Jerseys The Monteverdi violins of the Gabrieli Consort Players Links The Gabrieli Consort Players The Gabrielis recordings at Deutsche Grammophon Paul McCreesh Oliver Webber George Stoppani luthier Real Guts Gamut Strings Aquila Strings Hans Reiners bowmaker Dimitry Badiarov bowmaker and violinist Northern Renaissance Instruments Violin String Shop Royal Northern College of Music Royal Academy of Music York Gate Collection

    Original URL path: http://www.themonteverdiviolins.org/links.html (2016-04-30)
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  • Contact
    sac goyard pas cher La Femme Prom Dresses Seattle Seahawks Jerseys Montreal Canadiens Jerseys Contact The Gabrieli Consort Players 372 Old Street London EC1V 9LT Tel 00 44 0 20 7613 4404 Fax 00 44 0 20 7613 4414 email The Gabrielis Oliver Webber George Stoppani Webmaster Feedback We have a blog for discussion of the Monteverdi violins and related topics Your comments will be very welcome Click the button

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  • The story of the Monteverdi violins
    region of Italy Monteverdi was said to prefer Cremonese instruments By mid July we had narrowed the field to 2 candidates a 1629 Brothers Amati belonging to the Royal Academy of Music and the 1595 model we eventually settled on The 1629 violin is beautiful but it was one of the first of the slightly larger Grand Amati design and therefore anachronistic for the Vespers of 1610 click on image Brothers Amati 1629 violin at the Royal Academy of Music Photo George Stoppani The construction of the violins had to begin with measuring and photographing the original We had taken all the necessary measure ments by the end of July 2005 I was able to take part in one measuring session and it was a fascinating and painstaking process Templates had to be used to measure the arching at critical points and a cunning device known as a Hacklinger gauge involving a spring and magnet allowed us to measure the thickness of the wood without taking the instrument apart A detailed photo session completed the work and George was able to start making the instruments at the beginning of August At this point questions about the details of the instruments came into play and we had to become detectives Surviving instruments fragments from museums paintings and other iconography musical evidence literary references and a healthy dose of common sense were all drawn upon to find answers For example some surviving instruments have marks where the bridge feet have been placed In many cases this is in the standard modern position level with the f hole nicks but in some we find them much closer to the tailpiece This makes an interesting comparison with many early 17th century paintings where we often see the bridge in a lower position especially though not exclusively in the work of Roman artists such as Caravaggio Guido Reni and Carlo Saraceni This led us to surmise a connection between bridge position and pitch standard because Roman pitch was significantly lower than Venetian pitch and the longer string length that the low bridge position gives is ideal for playing at lower pitch Since we are using A 440Hz for this recording we have chosen the standard bridge position although happily this does not exclude future experiments with different positions Possible bridge positions high pitch pink moderate pitch red low pitch blue Illustration by George Stoppani The shape of the bridge is also critical and we based our design on a pattern seen in a number of paintings by Cavarozzi Gentileschi and Guercino from the 1610s and 1620s No less a literary source than William Shakespeare also provides us with evidence about violin fittings his character James Soundpost in Romeo and Juliet 1597 suggests that the soundpost was new enough on the scene to warrant a little satire We could have continued researching 1 for years and no doubt will but eventually we felt we had answered the critical questions to the best of our ability The

    Original URL path: http://www.themonteverdiviolins.org/story-part2.html (2016-04-30)
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  • The Baroque violin
    step towards a solution This excess of compromise understandable though it may be seems in conflict with the true spirit of period performance This spirit has at its core the principle that we can learn most about the sound world of a particular era by using and trusting the information from that era this can apply to just about everything from instrument design to philosophy of performance It seems particularly pertinent to violin making where a great deal of information is available about historical practices and we must surely believe that great makers such as the Amatis Guarneris and Stradivaris made instruments which were best suited for playing the music then current In our own experience following this path has always given more rewarding musical results and this should be the ultimate test We believe that one plausible approach is to attempt to recreate instruments from a very specific time and place In our case we were fortunate to have a precise brief violins such as would have been used by Monteverdi in Mantua or Venice around 1610 Similar projects are limited only by the imagination for Purcell London in 1680 for Corelli Rome in 1690 for Couperin Paris in 1710 In this way we can avoid trying to promise too much we would not be aiming to create an instrument that could be used for everything a player might be asked to do and in doi ng so achieve the best possible results within the remit No Jack of all trades then but a true Master of one click on image The Monteverdi violins Photo James Gilham This is of course an ideal world philosophy As we are all painfully aware musicians even at the highest level rarely have the spare cash to commission several instruments However the Gabrieli

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  • Strings 2
    lowest string now matches the other three better being of the same material The sound of a gut violin G is not overly resonant but it has a full satisfying quality which if well used can be effective in ways that the wound G cannot Equal tension naturally alters the balance of the instrument because the increased tension on the lower strings means that they make a greater contribution to the overall sound of the instrument In other words the instrument is equally balanced throughout its range rather than being biased towards the treble Of course for post Baroque set ups bias towards the treble is entirely appropriate as the range of the instrument especially in solo repertoire is extended upwards 2 Blend An all gut equal tension set up is much more conducive to good blending both within the string family and without A string consort will be more effective with equal tension because equally balanced instruments mean there are no holes in the texture where individual instruments have weak points in their range And when the string consort sounds like a true family it will be a more effective counterpart to other consorts such as cornets and sackbuts shawms and dulcians or recorders This can be heard particularly clearly in the consort pieces in the Duke of Lerma recording from 2001 Increased string tension allows a greater volume of sound to be drawn from the instrument The same effort with the bow will produce more sound in addition the maximum volume achievable will be higher 3 Articulation On well made thick gut strings the articulation is a revelation A far greater range of attack and decay of each note is possible It becomes much easier to create the effect of speaking in music imagining each bow stroke as a syllable with different consonants to begin each one This is of course in keeping with the rhetorical approach to performance considered as the highest ideal in the Baroque era Rhetoric has become something of an overused word in recent years however the reasons for this are sound Almost everyone who wrote about music as performer teacher or theorist made the same point that the goals of the musician and the orator are the same to use their art and skill to move the listener to certain emotions passions at certain times in accordance with the meaning of the text This subject is explored in extensive and lucid detail by Judy Tarling in The Weapons of Rhetoric Corda Music 2004 From the player s perspective the instrument takes on a different feel altogether when strung in equal tension The resistance of the strings under bow and fingers is much greater and this can raise interesting questions about technique it is necessary to think very carefully about bow speed and bow control in general In the beginning this means a bit of experimentation and it can be taxing for a busy professional to re think his or her long practised technique

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