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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News
    in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More TRAFFIC aims to ensure that trade in wild plants and animals is not a threat to the conservation of nature Latest news from TRAFFIC Wednesday Feb 17 2016 Indonesia s little known pitta trade Petaling Jaya Malaysia 17th February 2016 A secretive bird that s a challenge to spot in the wild is a regular sight at some of Indonesia s notorious wild bird markets according to a newly published paper written by researchers from TRAFFIC and Birdtour Asia Click to read more Wednesday February 17 2016 at 14 21 Share Article Tuesday Feb 16 2016 Platform to enhance collaboration in countering illegal wildlife trade launched in Central Africa Douala Cameroon 16th February 2015 A new platform to promote collaboration between enforcement agencies engaged in tackling illegal wildlife trade and related criminal activities has been launched by representatives from justice and law enforcement agencies in four Central African countries Click to read more Tuesday February 16 2016 at 11 18 Share Article Monday Feb 15 2016 Conservation groups call for more protection for rays as well as sharks in new 10 year strategy San José Costa Rica 15th February 2016 A group of experts from international conservation organizations is announcing a new strategy for combating the decline of sharks and closely related rays while warning that the rays are even more threatened and less protected than the higher profile sharks Click to read more Monday February 15 2016 at 19 33 Share Article Thursday Feb 11 2016 China s market potential for sustainably sourced wild plants Cambridge UK 11th February 2016 A study launched this week by the International Trade Centre ITC and TRAFFIC examines the potential global market for sustainably sourced wild collected botanical ingredients originating from China the world s leading exporter of medicinal and aromatic plants MAPs accounting for over 15 of global exports Click to read more Thursday February 11 2016 at 9 55 Share Article Thursday Feb 04 2016 Chi on display at Noi Bai Airport Ha Noi Viet Nam February 2016 Posters featuring a successful businessman refusing gifts of rhino horn have gone on display in the International Terminal at Noi Bai Airport Click to read more Thursday February 4 2016 at 8 30 Share Article Thursday Feb 04 2016 India holds first national workshop on capacity building for effective wildlife law enforcement Coimbatore Tamil Nadu 4th February 2016 India s

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - About TRAFFIC
    Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More What we do en Français TRAFFIC the wildlife trade monitoring network is the leading non governmental organization working globally on trade in wild animals and plants in the context of both biodiversity conservation and sustainable development TRAFFIC specializes in Investigating and analysing wildlife trade trends patterns impacts and drivers to provide the leading knowledge base on trade in wild animals and plants Informing supporting and encouraging action by governments individually and through inter governmental cooperation to adopt implement and enforce effective policies and laws Providing information encouragement and advice to the private sector on effective approaches to ensure that sourcing of wildlife uses sustainability standards and best practice Developing insight into consumer attitudes and purchasing motivation and guiding the design of effective communication interventions aimed to dissuade purchasing of illicit wildlife goods TRAFFIC s mission is to ensure that trade in wild plants and animals is not a threat to the conservation of nature TRAFFIC s vision is of a world where wildlife trade is managed in a way that maintains healthy wildlife populations and ecosystems contributes to meeting human needs supports local and national economies and helps motivate commitments to conserve wild species and habitats TRAFFIC s considerable reputation credibility and influence are built on its development of carefully researched reliable knowledge

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/overview/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - TRAFFIC staff
    Support our work Help stop wildlife trafficking Focus on Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement International Agreements CBD l CITES l CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More TRAFFIC has more than 100 staff based in offices on 5 continents Staff attending the TRAFFIC Global Programme Meeting in Arusha Tanzania May 2015 Some key personnel Steven Broad Executive Director Marcus Phipps Director of Operations Roland Melisch Senior Director Europe and Africa James Compton Senior Director Asia Pacific Teresa Mulliken Director Programme Development Evaluation Crawford Allan Senior Director Wildlife Crime Sabri Zain Director of Policy Richard Thomas Global Communications Co ordinator Chen Hin

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/staff/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - TRAFFIC programme
    of biodiversity conservation efforts Wildlife trade biodiversity and wider environmental concerns The commercial use by people of wild animal and plant resources is an issue at the heart of the relationship between biodiversity conservation and sustainable development more Wildlife trade people and conservation incentives The historical impacts of wildlife trade on the status and security of biological resources have largely been negative more Scale and dynamics of the trade today The trade in wild plants and animals and their parts and derivatives is big business more Understanding the challenge Most of wildlife trade is legal but a significant portion of it is not more Action for change There is an urgent need for knowledge and action more 2 A strategy for change TRAFFIC s work programme is built around changing attitudes and behaviour Effective regulation Governments with stakeholder input enact adapt implement and enforce policies and legislation that ensure trade in wild animals and plants is not a threat to the conservation of nature Positive economic and social incentives Governments and the private sector develop and adopt economic policies and practices that provide incentives and benefits that encourage the maintenance of wildlife trade within sustainable levels and support effective wildlife trade regulation Sustainable consumer behaviour Traders and consumers make choices in their wildlife purchasing decisions that do not threaten the conservation of nature Mobilized knowledge Decision makers at all levels acquire and apply sound knowledge about the scope dynamics and conservation impact of wildlife trade and its response to different management measures and approaches 3 Sub programmes Programme delivery is guided by a more detailed implementation plan which identifies specific stakeholder groups to be targeted and the tactics to be used and also locations both source and market of particular importance for achieving results in the following seven sub programmes i Flagship Species Strengthening enforcement and reducing demand to eliminate illegal trade of Flagship Species ii Wild Animals Used for Food and Medicine Supporting species conservation and livelihoods affected by consumption of wildlife for food and medicine iii Wild Animals Used for Pets Display and Ornamentation Reducing trade threats to species used for decoration and pets iv Fisheries Supporting improved management to reduce unsustainable fisheries v Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Botanicals Promoting best practice in the botanicals sector to support conservation healthcare and livelihoods vi Timber Providing tools and catalysing collaboration to verify the legality of timber in trade vii Rapid Action Sounding the alarm and taking targeted action against emerging trade threats 4 Result areas The TRAFFIC work programme has four key result areas i Co operation International conventions and agreements strengthen national government actions ii Regulation Regulation and management systems are well designed governed and enforced iii Sourcing Sourcing by producers and suppliers uses sustainability standards and best practice iv Purchasing Wildlife consumers avoid illicit goods and choose those sustainably sourced 5 TRAFFIC s core competencies TRAFFIC is widely acknowledged as possessing expertise in a number of key areas Research TRAFFIC s research methods include market surveys assessment

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/traffic-programme/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade
    housing to ingredients in manufacturing processes such as gums and resins clothing and ornaments leather furs feathers etc sport from falconry to trophy hunting healthcare everything from herbal remedies traditional medicines to ingredients for industrial pharmaceuticals An estimated 80 of the world s population are said to rely for primary health care on traditional medicines religion many animals and plants or derivatives are used for religious purposes collections many wildlife specimens and curios are collected by museums and private individuals The primary motivating factor for wildlife traders is economic ranging from small scale local income generation to major profit oriented business such as marine fisheries and logging companies Between collectors of wildlife and the ultimate users any number of middlemen may be involved in the wildlife trade including specialists involved in storage handling transport manufacturing industrial production marketing and the export and retail businesses In fact most of us are involved in wildlife trade in some way even if it just as end consumers of wildlife products Scale The wildlife trade involves hundreds of millions of individual plants and animals from tens of thousands of species Big leaf mahogany Swietenia macrophylla marked for felling by the logging company WWF Canon James FRANKHAM Timber and seafood are the most important categories of international wildlife trade in terms of both volume and value According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization FAO more than 100 billion of fish were traded and nearly 200 billion timber in 2009 To put this into perspective in the same year the global trade value of tea coffee and spices all together was 24 3 billion It is estimated that 70 000 species of plant are used for medicinal purposes alone Additionally approximately 25 of modern pharmacy medicines have been developed based on the medicinal properties of wild species Little is known about the status of many of these species although those that have been assessed show a concerning picture International trade in species of conservation concern is monitored by CITES From 2005 2009 CITES recorded an annual average of more than 317 000 live birds just over 2 million live reptiles 2 5 million crocodilian skins 1 5 million lizard skins 2 1 million snake skins 73 tonnes of caviar 1 1 million coral pieces and nearly 20 000 hunting trophies Not all trade is legal of course between 2005 and 2009 EU enforcement authorities made over 12 000 seizures of illegal wildlife products in the EU More on EU wildlife trade Value In the early 1990s TRAFFIC estimated the value of legal wildlife products imported globally was around USD160 billion In 2009 the estimated value of global imports was over USD323 billion TRAFFIC estimated the legal trade of wildlife products into the EU alone was worth an estimated 93 billion in 2005 and this increased to nearly 100 billion in 2009 By its very nature it is almost impossible to obtain reliable figures for the value of illegal wildlife trade but the figure must

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/trade/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - accounts
    External TRAFFIC publications Contact Jobs Donate Support our work Help stop wildlife trafficking Focus on Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement International Agreements CBD l CITES l CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More How much income we receive and where we spend it As a registered UK charity Number 1076722 TRAFFIC s accounts are submitted to the UK Charity Commission and independently audited and verified A summary of our most recent accounts for the fiscal year 1st July 2013 to 30th June 2014 can be found on the UK Charity Commission website There you can also find a summary of our

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/accounts/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Outreach
    Media reports News archive Publications SEARCH Publications Subscribe to publications Publications by Species Publications by Topic TRAFFIC Bulletin TRAFFIC Newsletters Proceedings workshops CITES CoP background External TRAFFIC publications Contact Jobs Donate Support our work Help stop wildlife trafficking Focus on Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement International Agreements CBD l CITES l CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Moving from awareness raising to consumer behavioural change Awareness Raising Over the years TRAFFIC has produced a number of materials to raise awareness about wildlife trade issues Examples of some of them can be found here although many of the initiatives we have

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/outreach/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - TRAFFIC and CBD
    COP12 Business and Biodiversity Forum Mainstreaming Biodiversity Innovative Opportunities for Business during the Focus Group 3c What are the Benefits and Means of Engaging with Local Communities with the United Nations University UNU On Demonstrating the role of biodiversity and ecosystems in delivering good health at low cost with partners of the Biodiversity and Community Health Initiative On Framing biodiversity and health in the context of the post 2015 development agenda with Secretariat of CBD World Health Organisation WHO Bioversity International Diversitas Ecohealth Alliance WCS Health Ecosystems Analysis of Linkages HEAL and UNU IAS TRAFFIC contributions towards achieving the CBD Aichi Biodiversity Targets Referencing the CBD Aichi Biodiversity Targets TRAFFIC s 2020 goal is to help reduce the pressure of illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade on biodiversity and enhance the benefits to wildlife conservation and human well being that derive from trade at sustainable levels TRAFFIC s work typically focuses on specific Programmes of Work of the CBD and our experts normally attend official CBD meetings including Conferences of the Parties CoPs Meetings of the Subsidiary Body on Scientific Technical and Technological Advice SBSTTA as well as specific Working Groups WG and Liaison Groups LG of the Convention and to provide information and assistance to help in the deliberations and decision making processes of these meeetings TRAFFIC also advises the CBD s National Focal Points people or institutions designated by a government to represent the Party between CoPs in its routine dealings with the CBD Secretariat and has provided expert support towards National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans NBSAPs the principal instruments for implementing the Convention at the national level TRAFFIC has also provided input during the process of revising the CBD s current Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011 2020 including its Aichi Biodiversity Targets Just ahead of CBD CoP10 in Nagoya Japan TRAFFIC was invited by the CBD Secretariat to become a Party to the Memorandum of Cooperation between international Agencies Organisations and Conventions and the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity on the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011 2020 and the Achievement of the 2020 Aichi Targets The following Case Studies illustrate TRAFFIC s work in supporting sustainable wild harvesting and equitable trade in medicinal and aromatic plants Case Study FairWild Standard and online Why Go Wild toolkit PDF 400 KB Case Study Traditional Chinese medicine in China PDF 200 KB Case Study Community work in Viet Nam PDF 400 KB Case Study Developing Ayurvedic trade chain from India to Europe PDF 250 KB Relevant areas of TRAFFIC s programme TRAFFIC s programme is designed to address specific issues related to the CBD in particular in relation to the Aichi Biodiversity Targets Over exploitation of wild animals and plants for trade is the second biggest threat to biodiversity after habitat destruction It also threatens the livelihoods of people who depend on wild resources particularly the rural poor TRAFFIC s programme is designed to address such issues in line with achieving the aims of the

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/cbd/ (2016-02-18)
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