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  • TRAFFIC - Cop12
    by Topic TRAFFIC Bulletin TRAFFIC Newsletters Proceedings workshops CITES CoP background External TRAFFIC publications Contact Jobs Donate Support our work Help stop wildlife trafficking Focus on Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement International Agreements CBD l CITES l CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More 12th Conference of the Parties CoP12 to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES Santiago Chile 3 15 November 2002 Meeting report 718 representatives from CITES Parties and 447 observers from intergovernmental international and national organizations attended CoP12 Find out about the key decisions at the meeting from the CITES

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/cop12/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - CoP11
    trade Wild meat Media reports News archive Publications SEARCH Publications Subscribe to publications Publications by Species Publications by Topic TRAFFIC Bulletin TRAFFIC Newsletters Proceedings workshops CITES CoP background External TRAFFIC publications Contact Jobs Donate Support our work Help stop wildlife trafficking Focus on Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement International Agreements CBD l CITES l CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More 11th Conference of the Parties CoP11 to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES Gigiri Kenya 10 20 April 2000 Meeting report Find out about the key decisions at the meeting from the

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/cop11/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Networks
    origins lie in a meeting that took place in Jaipur India in 2008 where environmental ministers from eight countries in the region announced their intention of forming a regional wildlife enforcement network and called for the establishment of a South Asia Experts Group on illegal wildlife trade SAWEN was formally launched in 2011 The eight member countries are Afghanistan Bangladesh Bhutan India Maldives Nepal Pakistan and Sri Lanka and the headquarters are in Nepal SAWEN broadly aims to foster an awareness of the issues and implications of wildlife trade across countries by sharing information and developing joint strategies to assist in combating illegal trade networks In particular it aims to Identify trade hotspots and priority species Undertake analysis of trade routes Strengthen links between field and policy co ordination Encourage better communication across key stakeholders Support the strengthening of appropriate national legislation Examples of TRAFFIC s engagement with SAWEN Since its inception TRAFFIC has been providing technical support to SAWEN to assist with the countering of illegal wildlife trade in the region In 2012 SAWEN s first regional meeting took place attended by officials from all eight member countries alongside experts from other wildlife enforcement networks such as ASEAN WEN and NGOs including TRAFFIC In 2014 TRAFFIC provided expert input and helped to organize a meeting where a statute outlining SAWEN s visions and goals were adopted Central American Wildlife Enforcement Network ROAVIS or CAWEN The need for a wildlife enforcement network in Central America was first identified in 2010 following a meeting of relevant government representatives in El Salvador From this La Red de Observancia y Aplicación de la Normativa de Vida Silvestre de Centroamérica y República Dominicana ROAVIS was created later the same year Aims of ROAVIS include Strengthen co operation between ROAVIS members Co ordinate training for administrative officials regarding wildlife legislation Create national networks to allow effective implementation and enforcement of wildlife legislation Promote and maintain partnerships between governmental and non governmental organizations A link to the executive summary of Second Meeting and Workshop of ROAVIS In 2015 members of ROAVIS took part in regional training and capacity building workshops designed to strengthen inter regional collaboration at which TRAFFIC provided input and Spanish language materials Central African Forests Commission COMIFAC Created in 1999 by the Yaoundé Declaration COMIFAC is made up of 10 member countries Burundi Cameroon Congo Gabon Equatorial Guinea Chad Rwanda Central African Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo and Sao Tome and Principe It is the principle political and technical forum for guidance and coordination in the sustainable management of forest and savannah ecosystems and also plays a significant role in the Congo Basin Forest Partnership CBFP The COMIFAC Convergence plan is at the heart of this enforcement network and looks to facilitate the sustainable and joint management of forest resources The plan has several key themes including broadening knowledge of the resource develop funding mechanisms and improve management of ecosystems and reforestation Examples of TRAFFIC s engagement with COMIFAC In 2008 TRAFFIC

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/asean-wen/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - ASEAN Countries Make Major Progress on Wildlife, Habitat Conservation
    governments and international partners to coordinate enforcement efforts in a concerted effort to halt wildlife crime and habitat depletion The agreement came at a meeting A Forgotten Crisis Arresting Wildlife Depletion through Strengthened Partnerships and Regional Cooperation that was held April 10 12 in Pattaya Thailand ASEAN WEN is the region s largest environmental law enforcement network It links scores of environmental agencies police organizations customs bureaus and members of the judiciary from all 10 ASEAN member countries to share intelligence conduct investigations and train officers to combat wildlife trafficking and implement international and national laws regulating wildlife trade The Pattaya conference was hosted by the Government of Thailand and sponsored by the World Bank ASEAN WEN the Save the Tiger Fund TRAFFIC the U S Agency for International Development and the FREELAND Foundation With illegal trade in wildlife estimated at over 10 billion across Asia second only to weapons and drug smuggling participants at the conference made a call to action with agreement on a new wildlife Manifesto Combating Wildlife Crime in Asia supported by ASEAN Secretary General Surin Pitsuwan Thailand Minister of Natural Resources and Environment H E Suwit Khunkitti and World Bank President Robert Zoellick Mr Zoellick in his message said ASEAN members other interested countries in Asia and a powerful coalition of partners in civil society with strong support from the World Bank have come together today to tackle wildlife crime head on and to take smart steps immediate steps to coordinate a regional law enforcement response to protect endangered species and protect habitats The tiger is one sad example of a threatened species that we must protect The World Bank has joined with other partners to help save the wild tigers of Asia whose numbers have declined over the last century from 100 000 to less than 4 000 We congratulate the participants for these outcomes and thank the Government of Thailand for hosting this important event A major effort by the World Bank is under way and gaining momentum the Global Tiger Initiative It was launched last year by the Bank as an international collaborative platform dedicated to saving wild tigers and mainstreaming biodiversity The delegates began preparations for the Year of the Tiger Summit in 2010 that will bring high level political commitment to save the wild tigers Asia s religious and cultural icon and the symbol of environmental sustainability Despite the efforts of individual governments and conservation organizations wild tigers and many other endangered wildlife species are silently disappearing from the Asian landscape Saving them requires a concerted multinational effort with support from top political leaders and international organizations Since its inception in 2005 ASEAN WEN has become a successful model for regional cooperation in transnational law enforcement on illegal wildlife trade The Secretary General of ASEAN Dr Surin Pitsuwan reflected on the achievements of this week s conference saying We have a unique diverse and rich biodiversity that needs to be protected carefully We must all work together to conserve our

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2009/4/15/asean-countries-make-major-progress-on-wildlife-habitat-cons.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Cambodia holds ASEAN wildlife crimes workshop
    s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Aug 20 2010 Cambodia holds ASEAN wildlife crimes workshop Click photo to enlarge Renee Yee TRAFFIC Phnom Penh 20th August 2010 Key judiciary and law enforcement leaders met this week to review prosecution of wildlife offences in Cambodia The meeting took place against a backdrop of rising organized transnational wildlife crime in the region and was hosted by the United States Agency for International Development and the Cambodian Ministry of Justice Delegates included judges and prosecutors from the ten most at risk provinces in Cambodia national police Customs officials and Department of Forestry Administration officials They were joined by prosecution experts from the U S Department of Justice and from the ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network ASEAN WEN plus regional organizations TRAFFIC and FREELAND South East Asia is a global biodiversity hotspot and home to many endemic and endangered species it is also a major hub for the illegal wildlife trade Although laws exist to penalize offenders often those charged with wildlife related offences walk away with minor penalties and in some cases continue with their illegal activities Law enforcement officers have been appealing for stiffer penalties and higher rates of prosecution

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2010/8/20/cambodia-holds-asean-wildlife-crimes-workshop.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - China and ASEAN states join hands to curb illegal wildlife trade
    recently met to enhance collaboration between China s National Inter agency CITES Enforcement Coordination Group NICE CG and ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network ASEAN WEN to combat illegal wildlife trafficking Dr Meng Xianlin Executive Deputy Director of China s Endangered Species Import and Export Management Office remarked in his opening address on the importance of enhanced communications and collaboration in wildlife trade management and law enforcement between China and the 10 ASEAN member countries namely Brunei Cambodia Indonesia Lao PDR Malaysia Myanmar Philippines Singapore Thailand and Viet Nam The meeting focused on the fact that illegal trade in wildlife threatens the planet s natural heritage in addition to the political economic and social interests of China and ASEAN This inaugural technical consultation meeting on wildlife enforcement co operation and CITES matters between the NICE CG and ASEAN WEN was attended by over 60 wildlife law enforcement officials from the 10 ASEAN WEN member countries China and the USA Representatives from INTERPOL TRAFFIC the USAID funded ARREST Program FREELAND Foundation IFAW and Conservation International also participated in the meeting As one of the major consumers of wildlife resources China is making efforts to regulate the management of wildlife trade and curb the illegal trade in flora and flora for example enforcing new laws and regulations implementing a labelling system for ivory products setting up a national co ordination group and undertaking nation wide wildlife law enforcement actions Dr Meng said We hope China and ASEAN countries can work together to prevent wildlife crime because such efforts are important to promote harmony between human beings and nature TRAFFIC one of the co sponsors of the meeting gave a presentation on its work with government law enforcement agencies to combat illegal wildlife trade in China and ASEAN through provision of evidence based research and information combined with capacity building support for enforcement agencies During the past 12 months TRAFFIC has supported a total of 10 enforcement training workshops at provincial regional or national level targeting nearly 1 000 enforcement officials from a range of Chinese government agencies including the CITES Management Authority Customs Forest Police Border Police General Administration of Industry Commerce General Administration of Quality Supervision Inspection Quarantine and Fishery departments Southern China particularly the provinces of Yunnan Guangxi and Guangdong is a critical region for wildlife trafficking and consumption with strong trade and geographical links to ASEAN The number of wildlife criminal cases in these three provinces accounted for 68 3 of the national total according to National Forest Police statistics in 2011 TRAFFIC worked with the National Forest Police Bureau of State Forestry Administration to hold a South China Wildlife Enforcement Training Workshop in Kunming of Yunnan Province in May attended by more than 70 representatives from Forest Police Customs as well as the Procuratorate and Courts of Yunnan Guangdong and Guangxi provinces The Nanning meeting recommended that China and ASEAN WEN work together closely on specific aspects of information sharing and public awareness capacity building and training reducing demand for

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2012/7/2/china-and-asean-states-join-hands-to-curb-illegal-wildlife-t.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Hands-on training for enforcement officers in Myanmar
    How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Feb 15 2013 Hands on training for enforcement officers in Myanmar Officers from across Myanmar received training on wildlife law enforcement last month TRAFFIC Hmawbi Yangon Myanmar 15th February 2013 Law enforcement officers from across Myanmar participated in a series of workshops on wildlife trade and species identification last month getting hands on training that will strengthen the resource rich country s ability to battle wildlife traffickers The workshops were organized and delivered by frontline officers who received prior training under a project funded by The Ministry of Environment Japan the secretariat of the East and Southeast Asia Biodiversity Information Initiative ESABII The course aimed to provide taxonomic and legal information necessary to allow officers to identify species they find in trade essential skills in the enforcement of wildlife trade legislation and protection of endangered species Over 60 participants attended the workshop including officers from the Myanmar Forestry Department Myanmar Police Force Department of Fisheries Department of Border Trade Customs Department Myanmar Port Authority Department of Rural Development Immigration Department Directorate of Trade Union Office of the Attorney General the General Administration Department and representatives of the local District Law Office The recent workshops follow on from Training of Trainer ToT courses held in Malaysia in 2011 where participants from 12 Asian countries were provided materials and training to conduct their own in country training Myanmar is the third country to hold follow up workshops after Viet Nam 2011 and Cambodia 2012 All of the ESABII workshops have had the support of the ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network ASEAN WEN which works regionally to address illegal wildlife trade Participants were equipped with ASEAN WEN Identification Sheets for Species Commonly Found in Trade in South East Asia TRAFFIC has produced five new species identification sheets which will be added to the current set and translated for use in 12 Asian countries Experts from the Forestry Department the Wildlife Conservation Society Myanmar Programme and Friends of Wildlife led practical training sessions in which officers received hands on training on the identification of freshwater turtles and tortoises as well as other species commonly traded in the region Two of those main lecturers were the participants of the ToT in Malaysia Myanmar is a biologically rich country which needs to conserve its unique nature and biodiversity It is vital that the Government agencies and institutions responsible for protecting

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2013/2/15/hands-on-training-for-enforcement-officers-in-myanmar.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Wildlife crime-fighting training package for ASEAN Customs officers
    website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Mar 08 2013 Wildlife crime fighting training package for ASEAN Customs officers Bangkok Thailand 8th March Customs officers across Southeast Asia will now have access to a wildlife crime fighting knowledge kit that will help tackle the problem on the frontlines Designed by TRAFFIC the materials were developed to introduce local and global wildlife trade issues to enforcement officers It provides information on laws that govern wildlife trade including the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES It also details the species methods and routes favoured by wildlife smugglers Known as the ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network ASEAN WEN Training Management Package TMP it has already been used to educate and raise the capacity of 1 500 enforcement officers to fight wildlife crime in the region The materials were handed over to the ASEAN Customs Enforcement and Compliance Working Group at its 13th meeting in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia and will be offered to all national offices in the region for use in their training syllabus The TMP enables government agencies to carry out courses independently tailor it to meet specific priorities and to include it in existing national training curricula Additionally it includes a critical tool that helps officers to ascertain the species they come across in shipments and seizures This

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2013/3/8/wildlife-crime-fighting-training-package-for-asean-customs-o.html (2016-02-18)
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