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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - South Asian ministers pledge regional co-operation in tackling illegal wildlife trade
    a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Saturday May 31 2008 South Asian ministers pledge regional co operation in tackling illegal wildlife trade South Asia Wildlife Enforcement Network to be established Seized wildlife products in Nepal In a Ministerial statement the Jaipur Declaration countries in South Asia pledged to work together to tackle wildlife crime in the region Click photo to enlarge Jeff Foott WWF Canon Jaipur India May 2008 The eight member countries of the South Asia Co operative Environment Programme SACEP have pledged to work together to tackle illegal wildlife trade in the region In a Ministerial statement known as the Jaipur Declaration countries in the region have supported the development of a South Asia regional strategic plan on illegal wildlife trade and the establishment of a South Asia wildlife enforcement network SAWEN Countries also endorsed a South Asia regional strategic plan on illegal wildlife trade that will focus on key areas of work including co operation and co ordination effective legislation policies and law enforcement sharing knowledge and effective dissemination of information intelligence networks and early warning systems and capacity building The Declaration followed the Eleventh Meeting of the Governing Council of SACEP where Environment Ministers from Afghanistan Bangladesh Bhutan India the Maldives Nepal Pakistan and Sri Lanka issued a Statement stressing the importance of mutual networking and technical support to address the needs of the region in combating illegal wildlife trade Regional co operation can provide the best solution for regional problems the Ministers said SACEP is an inter government organisation established in 1982 for promoting regional co operation in South Asia in the environment field Countries also urged the establishment of a South Asia experts group on illegal wildlife trade to provide a forum for technical representatives to develop regional programmes through networking as well as the sharing and dissemination of knowledge and information The South Asia region is a storehouse of biological diversity and rich terrestrial freshwater and marine resources It is home to 15 5 percent of the world s flora and 12 percent of the world s fauna including threatened species such as Tigers elephants rhinos and marine turtles However illegal trade and over exploitation of wild animals and plants poses a major challenge to the conservation of biodiversity in South Asia Last year a meeting of the SACEP Governing Council called for the development of a work programme to combat illegal trade in wild species and their products and help strengthen enforcement of CITES the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora in the region SACEP Director General Dr Arvind A Boaz said the commitment lays the foundations for a co operative effort to crack down on illegal trade and to improve the management of wild species and the implementation of CITES in the region This is the first comprehensive wildlife trade initiative of its kind in South Asia and SACEP is confident

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/5/31/south-asian-ministers-pledge-regional-co-operation-in-tackli.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - South Asia Wildlife Enforcement Network (SAWEN) formally launched at Paro
    of Bhutan thereby opening a new chapter in regional cooperation in South Asia for strengthening wildlife law enforcement It was agreed to base the SAWEN Secretariat in Nepal Illegal wildlife trade is a form of trans national organized crime that threatens many iconic species across the world South Asia home to a diverse network of natural ecosystems and varied biodiversity is especially vulnerable to such threats Apart from key species such as tigers elephants and rhinos there are a variety of medicinal plants timber marine species birds and reptiles are threatened by illegal exploitation and trafficking To counter such threats the eight countries of South Asia have come together to establish an organized and co ordinated body the South Asia Wildlife Enforcement Network SAWEN SAWEN will help Bhutan to link up with authorities and officials across the region to share good practices and resources to co operate and co ordinate actions to apprehend poachers and traffickers said Lyonpo Dr Pema Gyamtsho Honourable Minister for Agriculture and Forests Bhutan at the opening of the expert group s meeting In May 2010 the Government of Nepal hosted the First meeting of the South Asia Experts Group on Illegal Wildlife Trade which prepared an operational roadmap for the establishment of SAWEN Continuing with the priorities identified during the Nepal meeting Bhutan in collaboration with the Interim SAWEN Secretariat hosted the Second Meeting of the South Asia Experts Group on Illegal Wildlife Trade on 29th and 30th Jan 2011 in Paro Bhutan Relevant focal persons and experts from the governments of member countries inter governmental organizations including the CITES Secretariat and INTERPOL and non governmental organizations including WWF and TRAFFIC participated in the two day meeting The critical points decided by the Experts Group during the meeting were An agreed action oriented work plan for joint activities some of which will begin immediately and which will continue to develop further as the network gathers strength Establishing a SAWEN Secretariat which will be hosted by the Government of Nepal An agreed governance and operational structure for SAWEN The need for strategic collaboration on communications and fundraising CITES is delighted to see SAWEN come into being and we look forward to supporting the Network said John Sellar Chief of Enforcement CITES Secretariat The member countries have today demonstrated their commitment to bringing to justice those criminals who are robbing this part of the world of its precious natural resources These criminals should be behind bars wearing stripes on prison uniforms This is the only way that these individuals can be reminded of the thousands of Tigers that have been killed in recent years Mr Sellar said The meeting was organized by the Ministry of Agriculture and Forests Royal Government of Bhutan with technical support from TRAFFIC and WWF Bhutan TRAFFIC the wildlife trade monitoring network has been providing technical support for the SAWEN process since its inception and acknowledges the generous funding support of the US Department of State With the formal operation of SAWEN beginning

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2011/1/30/south-asia-wildlife-enforcement-network-sawen-formally-launc.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - SAWEN officials prioritize efforts to combat illegal wildlife trade in South Asia
    TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Jun 07 2012 SAWEN officials prioritize efforts to combat illegal wildlife trade in South Asia The First Regional Meeting of the South Asia Wildlife Enforcement Network SAWEN took place in Sri Lanka earlier this week Click image to enlarge Dept of Wildlife Conservation Sri Lanka Negombo Sri Lanka 7th June 2012 Officials from the countries of South Asia met this week to devise operational plans to combat illegal trade affecting some of the region s most threatened wildlife species The First Regional Meeting of the South Asia Wildlife Enforcement Network SAWEN which took place in Sri Lanka from 3rd 6th June also worked on an updated work programme and discussed issues such as intelligence gathering information sharing capacity building and law enforcement cooperation Launched last year SAWEN is comprised of member countries Afghanistan Bangladesh Bhutan India Maldives Nepal Pakistan and Sri Lanka The meeting was attended by over 30 wildlife and law enforcement officials from all eight South Asian countries Participants also included experts from INTERPOL the World Customs Organization s Regional Intelligence Liaison Office for the Asia Pacific United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime World Bank the ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network the Global Tiger Forum the South Asia Co operative Environment Programme SACEP WWF and TRAFFIC In an important effort to address source to market law enforcement co operation the CITES Management Authority of China also joined the meeting as an observer China shares terrestrial borders with five South Asian countries and is a major trade partner with the region Officially opening the meeting Sri Lanka s Minister of Environment the Hon Anura Priyadarshana Yapa expressed his country s keen interest and commitment in co operating and networking with other regional partner organisations for combating illegal trade It is extremely necessary that all South Asian countries should get together and help each other prevent illegal trade of bio resources across their respective country borders According to the SAWEN Chief Enforcement Coordinator Mr Krishna P Acharya the meeting identified a number of illegal trade priorities for enhancing regional cooperation focused on species such as Asian big cats elephants freshwater turtles falcons rhinos and marine turtles Wildlife trade routes and hubs for these species were carefully examined and mapped he said Operational plans were also discussed which would allow SAWEN

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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - South Asia to develop Action Plan to curb wildlife trafficking
    the representatives of the South Asian countries at this meeting that was held from 26 29 August 2014 This push from the SAWEN member countries places the region firmly in the spotlight of a growing international commitment to dealing with increasingly organised illegal wildlife trade networks as part of a broader strategic approach to combat trans national organised crime The meeting was particularly successful in adopting the SAWEN Statute and beginning an intense process for developing an action plan for the next six years The Statute clearly details the vision goal objectives and the crucial role that SAWEN will play in combating wildlife crime in the region The Statute endorsed by member country delegates to the meeting will now await the final endorsement from the Governments of the eight South Asian countries Delegates from Afghanistan Bangladesh Bhutan India Maldives Nepal Pakistan and Sri Lanka joined various inter governmental organizations international and regional organizations working on matters of wildlife trade and international policies A number of international donors including the World Bank USAID and the US Department of State participated in this meeting Expert input was provided by the international community in support of the eight member countries and the SAWEN Secretariat This included INTERPOL the Secretariat of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime UNODC The World Bank TRAFFIC WWF Tigers Alive Initiative and WWF Nepal The meeting provided a practical platform for sharing experiences discussing common issues reviewing performances and enhancing collaboration with various partners and donors for combating wildlife crime in the region This included lessons learned by the ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network and suggestions from the CITES Management Authority of China in terms of collaboration and support to SAWEN Mr Megh Bahadur Pandey Chief Enforcement Coordinator of SAWEN said at the meeting Minimizing illegal wildlife trade from South Asia is crucial to the conservation of wildlife in the region Countries cannot fight highly organized and globalized wildlife crimes in isolation and need to collaborate and cooperate with other countries and partners He further added We are overwhelmed to see the support that has come from all South Asian countries and international partners to strengthen the initiatives of SAWEN and helping it achieve its mandate The approved Statute will allow it to work as an independent institution working in tandem with the goals and objectives of the eight South Asian countries for fighting wildlife crime Dr S S Garbyal Director General of Forest and Special Secretary Ministry of Environment and Forests Government of India who chaired several important sessions during the meeting said India recognizes the threats illegal wildlife trade poses to the unique and rich biodiversity of South Asia and is committed to supporting the initiatives taken by SAWEN to deal with wildlife crime at a regional level Dr Shekhar Kumar Niraj Head of TRAFFIC in India illustrated the roles that NGOs like TRAFFIC can play in collecting targeted information to assist

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/8/27/south-asia-to-develop-action-plan-to-curb-wildlife-trafficki.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Mesoamerica authorities get to grips with sea cucumbers and corals
    Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday May 11 2015 Mesoamerica authorities get to grips with sea cucumbers and corals TRAFFIC provides training on coral and sea cucumber management and identification TRAFFIC Merida Yucatan Mexico May 2015 Delegates from across Mesoamerica met last month at two regional training and capacity building workshops organized by TRAFFIC in co ordination with Mexico s General Attorney for the Protection of the Environment PROFEPA on precious and semi precious corals and sea cucumbers The events were supported by The US Embassy in Mexico and the USFWS Wildlife Without Borders LAC Program Inaugural sessions were led by Sonya Tsiros US Consul in Merida Reinaldo Morales Rodríguez Leading expert of the Regional Fisheries Organization OSPESCA Arturo Rodriguez PROFEPA Under prosecutor and Adrian Reuter TRAFFIC TRAFFIC More than 60 participants from Mexico Belize Guatemala El Salvador Panama Nicaragua Costa Rica Dominican Republic and Honduras and regional bodies such as OSPESCA regional fisheries organization and ROAVIS

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2015/5/11/mesoamerica-authorities-get-to-grips-with-sea-cucumbers-and.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - TRAFFIC to collaborate on Central African forestry initiative
    Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Sep 11 2008 TRAFFIC to collaborate on Central African forestry initiative Germain Ngandjui Senior Programme Officer with TRAFFIC Central Africa pledged TRAFFIC s support to COMIFAC through the Central African bushmeat project TRAFFIC en Français Bangui Central Africa Republic 11 September 2008 The fifth ordinary council of ministers of COMIFAC the Central African forests commission took place today and was attended by around 100 participants from eight member countries Burundi Cameroon Congo Gabon Equatorial Guinea Central African Republic Democratic Republic Congo and Chad plus representatives from civil society and the donor community TRAFFIC was represented by Germain Ngandjui Senior Programme Officer of TRAFFIC Central Africa who offered his support TRAFFIC through our Central African bushmeat project would be happy to help elaborate directives on the sustainable management of non timber forest products

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/9/11/traffic-to-collaborate-on-central-african-forestry-initiativ.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Fighting wildlife crime through enhanced law enforcement collaboration in Central Africa
    enforcement officers officials of ministries in charge of wildlife issues and magistrates from six COMIFAC Central African Forest Commission countries Cameroon Chad Gabon Central African Republic Republic of Congo and Democratic Republic of Congo met last month with representatives from organizations involved in tackling wildlife crime to improve their co ordination in fighting criminal activity in the Central Africa region The training workshop aimed to bolster participants ability to recognize and gather the kind of information needed for wildlife crime risk assessment and to provide guidance on the methods available to do so COMIFAC representatives present reaffirmed their will to strengthen implementation of PAPECALF the regional law enforcement network aimed at combating poaching By facilitating information exchange between the numerous services and administrations within and between countries this workshop is strengthening the co operation and collaboration needed to tackle the trans boundary wildlife illegal trade said COMIFAC s Chouaibou Nchoutpouen During the meeting Stéphane Ringuet from TRAFFIC introduced an overview of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES and tools available to support wildlife law enforcement officers to control international trade in endangered species All Central African countries are members of CITES and are required to take appropriate measures to enforce the provisions of the Convention and to prevent trade violations The Convention is also central to the aims of COMIFAC s Plan de Convergence Enforcement agencies should be aware of the many training materials already available to help ensure strict compliance and control of trade in CITES listed species and help minimize the risk of illegal traffic said Ringuet Wildlife criminality in Central Africa is of particular concern because of the low risk and high profits linked to these illegal activities with current sanctions not reflecting the seriousness of the crime and therefore not acting as an adequate deterrent added Sone Nkoke Wildlife TRAPS project officer at TRAFFIC More than ever strengthening collaboration between law enforcement services at national and regional level is crucial and effective implementation of existing rules and procedures is fundamental said Alain Ononino Law Enforcement Coordinator at the WWF Central Africa Regional Programme Meanwhile the criminal activity has been linked to national security and political stability in the region an issue of particular concern to ECCAS the Economic Community of Central African States ECCAS has a specific political role regarding securing peace and security in Central Africa said Jean Baptiste Mamang Kanga of ECCAS ECCAS also pays particular attention to anti poaching and more globally on wildlife criminality that is a source of trafficking destabilization and loss of the heritage value of the forests and savannahs of the sub region Steve Thurlow from UNODC UN Office on Drugs and Crime introduced the ICCWC Wildlife and Forest Crime Analytical Toolkit and underlined how the Convention against Transnational Organized Crime also known as the Palermo Convention is the main instrument in the fight against transnational organized crime UNODC s Global Programme for Combating Wildlife and Forest Crime 2014 2017 will

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/7/8/fighting-wildlife-crime-through-enhanced-law-enforcement-col.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Central Asian border controls lifted. Wildlife trade under the spotlight.
    reports were issued at the 18th meeting of the Scientific Council of the Convention on Migratory Species of Wild Animals CMS which began today in Bonn Germany where a draft Central Asian Mammals Initiative is being presented to CMS scientists Political borders rarely coincide with natural habitats or ecosystems especially in mountain regions where national boundaries often follow ridgelines Mountain goats and predators like snow leopards and wolves live on both sides of mountain ranges and both sides of the borders so trans boundary cooperation between ministries countries and treaties are essential to conserve larger spatial scales to better manage the species and to help prevent illegal international trade the Marco Polo Sheep Argali in the Pamir is just one species which occurs across five countries said David Morgan Chief Scientific Officer CITES Central Asian countries are home to a rich fauna and flora that is also at risk from the illegal trade for Saiga horns musk Snow Leopard skins live falcons Argali sheep and endemic plant species in the Caucasus The CMS Central Asian Mammals Initiative CAMI brings all Central Asian countries around the table to conserve wildlife beyond borders in this critical global hotspot for animal migration said CMS Regional Officer for Central Asia Christiane Röttger Close collaboration between CMS CITES government agencies and NGOs such as TRAFFIC is vital to jointly tackle illegal wildlife trade and manage such charismatic species found in the region such as Snow Leopards Saiga antelopes and Argali Mountain Sheep sustainably The three new reports launched at the CMS Scientific Council today will make a major contribution to the future work of CAMI The Argali is a popular target for trophy hunters in Central Asia Alexander Kreik WWF Russia Lack of consistency in wildlife trade controls could result in the exploitation of the weakest link in the chain allowing illegal trade to enter the ECU by way of the route of least risk of detection or permit shopping whereby traders refused an import permit in one ECU member country obtain it from another The potential future enlargement of the ECU to include non CITES Parties such as Tajikistan may create an additional layer of complexity for those addressing the implementation and enforcement of CITES in the region Member States of the ECU also need to collaborate closely on management measures such as the setting of quotas or making non detriment findings a key requirement before countries can allow the export of CITES listed species under CITES Central Asia is home to a wide variety of charismatic species which are both important symbols of the region s diversity and of relevance to the region s economy but open borders within a customs union create obvious challenges for wildlife trade regulations to prevent illegal and unsustainable practices said Stephanie von Meibom TRAFFIC s Regional Director for Europe Trophy hunting could also be affected This is an important activity in this region with Russia and several Central Asian countries a popular destination for European hunters seeking

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/7/1/central-asian-border-controls-lifted-wildlife-trade-under-th.html (2016-02-18)
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