archive-org.com » ORG » T » TRAFFIC.ORG

Total: 219

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Release of rhino poachers exposes widespread enforcement failures
    search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Tuesday Mar 02 2010 Release of rhino poachers exposes widespread enforcement failures Rhinos in southern Africa are being poached for their horns used in Asian medicines Click photo to enlarge Martin Harvey WWF Canon Gland Switzerland 2 March 2010 The release of six alleged rhino poachers from custody two weeks before a meeting of the largest wildlife trade convention is emblematic of the chronic lack of political will to enact enforcement efforts required to save these endangered species A Zimbabwean court last week granted bail to six men arrested at Bubye Valley Conservancy home to Zimbabwe s largest remaining rhino population in connection with rhino poaching Charges included illegal possession of firearms and illegal possession of a rhino horn The incident part of a surge in rhino poaching in Zimbabwe and South Africa is made worse by a lack of enforcement support in Zimbabwe in particular As 175 countries prepare to meet to for the 15th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES CoP 15 in Doha in March the increased poaching of rhinos and trade in rhino horns compounded by failed enforcement efforts is threatening to undermine conservation successes to date Most rhinos are listed in the Convention s Appendix I which bans trade in their parts for commercial purposes Countries participating in the CITES convention have been tasked with combating illegal trade in rhino horn Zimbabwe s failure to live up to its obligations to CITES is unacceptable and has caused its already endangered rhino population to decline said Colman O Criodain Wildlife Trade Analyst WWF International The time has come for the CITES Parties collectively to decide how to address this failure This incident coming so soon after Zimbabwe was specifically urged by the CITES Secretariat to tighten up its law enforcement to protect rhinos will reduce Zimbabwe s ability to defend its wildlife management policies at the forthcoming CITES conference Last year rhino poaching worldwide hit a 15 year high due to increased demand for rhino horn A recent report by TRAFFIC and IUCN the International Union for the Conservation of Nature showed that since 2006 95

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2010/3/2/release-of-rhino-poachers-exposes-widespread-enforcement-fai.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive


  • TRAFFIC - Seizures journal legacy - 17 year sentence for rhino poacher in Zimbabwe
    plants Rhinos Sharks and rays Tigers Timber trade Wild meat Media reports News archive Publications SEARCH Publications Subscribe to publications Publications by Species Publications by Topic TRAFFIC Bulletin TRAFFIC Newsletters Proceedings workshops CITES CoP background External TRAFFIC publications Contact Jobs Donate Support our work Help stop wildlife trafficking Focus on Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement International Agreements CBD l CITES l CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Leopard skin seized in India Main Seafood smugglers arrested in Hong Kong Friday Jan 15 2010 17 year sentence for rhino poacher in Zimbabwe A man convicted of killing and de horning a

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/seizures-journal-legacy/2010/1/15/17-year-sentence-for-rhino-poacher-in-zimbabwe.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Seizures journal legacy - 4 arrested over ivory and rhino horn trafficking in Zambia
    Enforcement International Agreements CBD l CITES l CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More 100 tonnes of pangolins the tip of the iceberg Main Tortoise carrier held in India Monday Mar 02 2009 4 arrested over ivory and rhino horn trafficking in Zambia Zambia Wildlife Authority have arrested 4 people including 2 police officers over their alleged involvement in the smuggling of 72 elephant ivory and 5 rhino horn pieces in Zambia reports the Times of Zambia Zambia Two Cops Nabbed Over K1 Billion Ivory Times of Zambia 2 March 2009 ZAMBIA Wildlife Authority Zawa yesterday arrested four people including two police officers

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/seizures-journal-legacy/2009/3/2/4-arrested-over-ivory-and-rhino-horn-trafficking-in-zambia.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Seizures journal legacy - Rhino horn sellers arrested in Namibia
    archive Publications SEARCH Publications Subscribe to publications Publications by Species Publications by Topic TRAFFIC Bulletin TRAFFIC Newsletters Proceedings workshops CITES CoP background External TRAFFIC publications Contact Jobs Donate Support our work Help stop wildlife trafficking Focus on Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement International Agreements CBD l CITES l CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Poachers poisoning elephants in Indonesia Main Tiger parts and birds seized three arrested in Malaysia Friday Jun 12 2009 Rhino horn sellers arrested in Namibia Two men have appeared in court charged with attenpting to sell rhino horns in Namibia reports Allgemeine Zeitung Mit Nasenhörnern erwischt

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/seizures-journal-legacy/2009/6/12/rhino-horn-sellers-arrested-in-namibia.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Largest ever rhino horn seizure reported in Mozambique
    to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday May 15 2015 Largest ever rhino horn seizure reported in Mozambique File photo of rhino horn seizure made in China in 2013 TRAFFIC UPDATE Official confirmation is awaited but media reports indicate that 12 of the rhino horns earlier seized were stolen from a Police strong room in the early hours of Friday 22nd May 2015 A number of arrests have been made in connection with the latest theft Cambridge UK 15th May 2015 Police in Mozambique are reported to have seized a staggering 65 rhinos horns together with 1 1 tonnes of elephant ivory One Asian national is said to have been arrested on the outskirts of the capital Maputo at a house where the stash was stored Official details from the case are awaited but if the reports are confirmed the 65 horns would make this the largest ever rhino horn seizure made anywhere during the current rhino poaching crisis that commenced in 2008 The total is almost double that of the previous largest recorded haul some 33 horns seized in

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2015/5/15/largest-ever-rhino-horn-seizure-reported-in-mozambique.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Theft of rhino horns from police a huge setback to Mozambique’s law enforcement efforts
    of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday Jun 01 2015 Theft of rhino horns from police a huge setback to Mozambique s law enforcement efforts File photo of rhino horn seizure made in China in 2013 TRAFFIC Mozambique 1st June 2015 A police spokesman on Wednesday confirmed that 12 rhino horns had been stolen from a strong room in police provincial headquarters in Matola Maputo province and a number of arrests including government personnel had been made in connection with the theft The horns were among the 65 confiscated less than a fortnight previously in Mozambique as part of a record seizure alongside 1 1 tonnes of elephant ivory The seizure was originally heralded as a significant breakthrough in international efforts to clampdown on the criminal syndicates behind rhino poaching and the smuggling of horn from Africa to Asia although considerable confusion still exists over the number and nationality of people arrested in connection with the record bust However news of the police strong room theft represents a serious setback in efforts to follow up the seizure with significant investigations that could help break a major trafficking network TRAFFIC again urges Mozambique to seek the assistance of INTERPOL in providing the specialist support needed when significant seizures are made to ensure that vital law enforcement opportunities are not squandered said Milliken Mozambique should share with INTERPOL all evidence relating either to the original seizure or the subsequent theft The theft is a significant blow to the newly elected government which has publicly signalled its intent to address the country s poor law enforcement record and corruption President Felipe Nyusi recently signed a memorandum of understanding on closer collaboration with neighbouring Tanzania to address cross border crime and while speaking at a police parade to mark the 40th anniversary of the creation of the Mozambican police force President Nyusi reportedly said I cannot sleep when the statistics show an increasing number of police involved in crime Mozambique has a poor law enforcement record and the country is widely considered the major conduit for the trafficking of rhino horns out of Africa While there are encouraging signs that the political will exists to get to grips with the corruption and crime that is undermining Mozambican society this latest law enforcement lapse will come as a huge setback Milliken Mozambique now has an opportunity to act on its stated commitments to stamp out corruption and demonstrate to the world that it is serious about tackling wildlife crimes but a failure to do so will result in a serious loss of credibility for the new government said Milliken NOTES Previous enforcement lapses in Mozambique include the theft of wildlife products and the apparent complicity of government agencies On 27th February 2012 266 pieces of elephant ivory totalling 1 094 34 kg were stolen from the central ivory stockpile in Maputo

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2015/6/1/theft-of-rhino-horns-from-police-a-huge-setback-to-mozambiqu.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Vital evidence goes up in smoke
    Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Tuesday Jul 07 2015 Vital evidence goes up in smoke Minister Correia setting fire to the ivory and rhino horn yesterday WCS En français Mozambique 7th July 2015 Mozambique yesterday destroyed 2434 6 kg of elephant ivory and 86 pieces of rhino horn weighing a total of 193 5 kg according to media reports The products incinerated are believed to have included the 1 1 tonnes of elephant ivory and the remaining rhino horns out of 65 seized in May in Matola Mozambique the largest horn seizure to date during the current rhino poaching crisis Several of the 65 horns were subsequently stolen from a police warehouse with at least 7 suspects four of them police officers arrested in connection with the theft However it is unclear whether DNA samples following CITES Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora protocols were taken from the remaining rhino horns before they were destroyed although an independent audit of the materials burned is understood to have taken place CITES Decision 16 84 directs all Parties to submit rhinoceros horn samples from specimens subject to criminal investigation to designated accredited forensic laboratories for DNA analysis while CITES Decision 16 83 directs all Parties to do the same thing for any seizure of ivory that represents 500 kg or more Cases against those arrested in association with the seizure of the 65 horns and in the subsequent theft of 12 of them are still awaiting completion with the primary suspect in the original seizure reported to have absconded The apparent destruction of evidence in ongoing cases raises obvious concerns over how the legal process will now be properly followed in Mozambique said Tom Milliken TRAFFIC s rhino and elephant expert In fact Mozambique s recent mega seizure of rhino horns and elephant ivory has basically unfolded as a textbook case of legal unprofessionalism While the destruction of ivory and rhino horn will certainly prevent its leakage into illegal trade robust ivory and rhino horn stock management systems would appear

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2015/7/7/vital-evidence-goes-up-in-smoke.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Seizures journal legacy - Armed raiders steal rhino horn and ivory in South Africa
    CITES Networks Medicinal plants Rhinos Sharks and rays Tigers Timber trade Wild meat Media reports News archive Publications SEARCH Publications Subscribe to publications Publications by Species Publications by Topic TRAFFIC Bulletin TRAFFIC Newsletters Proceedings workshops CITES CoP background External TRAFFIC publications Contact Jobs Donate Support our work Help stop wildlife trafficking Focus on Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement International Agreements CBD l CITES l CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Smuggled orangutans discovered in Malaysian zoo Main Police raid Chinese medicine shop in UK Friday Jun 26 2009 Armed raiders steal rhino horn and ivory in South Africa 5 armed

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/seizures-journal-legacy/2009/6/26/armed-raiders-steal-rhino-horn-and-ivory-in-south-africa.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive



  •