archive-org.com » ORG » T » TRAFFIC.ORG

Total: 219

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Vietnamese again caught with rhino horns in South Africa
    Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Dec 16 2011 Vietnamese again caught with rhino horns in South Africa Rhino horn some people are prepared to risk years of their lives in jail to obtain one TRAFFIC Johannesburg South Africa 16th December 2011 South African authorities last week arrested two Vietnamese nationals at Johannesburg s O R Tambo International Airport as they attempted to smuggle rhino horns and elephant ivory Alerted by security x ray scanners as the suspects luggage passed through security members of the Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural Development along with the Police Service discovered two rhino horns five elephant tusks 20 ivory chopsticks 31 ivory bangles 18 ivory blocks and three ivory earrings The two arrested a 40 year old man and a 30 year old woman have been charged with illegal possession of elephant ivory and rhino horn under the National Environmental Management Biodiversity Act NEMBA TRAFFIC commends the South African authorities on the arrest of these two individuals who appear to be among those riding on the criminal tidal wave currently sweeping away South Africa s wildlife resources said Tom Milliken TRAFFIC s rhino and ivory expert If convicted they should face severe punishment to act as a deterrent to others that such actions will not be tolerated The arrest comes only months after another pair of Vietnamese nationals were convicted of smuggling 20 rhino horns at O R Tambo International Airport They were sentenced to 12 and 8 years in jail respectively A record number of rhinos more than 430 to date have been poached in South Africa in 2011 with the crisis continuing to escalate demand for ivory continues to fuel the poaching of elephants especially in East and Central Africa Although used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries in the treatment of fever the current high demand for rhino horn appears to be driven primarily from Viet Nam where it is being prescribed by some medical practitioners as a detoxicant and is popular among high flyers trying to impress their peers A rumour that a Vietnamese government minister was cured of

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2011/12/16/vietnamese-again-caught-with-rhino-horns-in-south-africa.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive


  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Pioneering research reveals new insights into the consumers behind rhino poaching
    fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Tuesday Sep 17 2013 Pioneering research reveals new insights into the consumers behind rhino poaching Martin Harvey WWF Canon en Français South Africa 17th September 2013 The use of rhino horn as a symbol of status among wealthy urban Vietnamese has been identified as a major driver of the current rhino poaching crisis Findings from consumer research concluded earlier this year in Viet Nam has added significantly to our understanding of why a growing economy and emergence of a middle class with disposable incomes is pressuring African rhino populations Funded by WWF South Africa WWF SA and co ordinated by TRAFFIC s Greater Mekong Programme Office this research surveyed 720 people in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City It found that the buyers and users of rhino horn primarily consider it a status symbol often used to gift to family members business colleagues or people in positions of authority They also associate it with a feeling of peace of mind Rhino horn consumers are wealthy and powerful and as such are seen as influential people within Vietnamese society says Dr Jo Shaw WWF SA s Rhino Co ordinator She adds While their reasons for purchasing and consuming rhino horn are linked to an underlying belief in its medicinal properties there is a current trend of use to enhance social standing Shaw further explains Research reveals that typical users of rhino horn are successful well educated men over the age of 40 who live in Viet Nam s main urban centres They value their luxury lifestyle which is often based around meeting peer group pressures and tend to view animals as commodities to serve functional and income generating purposes rather than feeling an emotional connection Perhaps the most significant finding is the fact that beyond current consumer groups lies a large intender group people who are not currently buying or using rhino horn but who expressed their intent to do so in future Dr Naomi Doak of TRAFFIC s Greater Mekong Programme says Intenders want to become buyers and users of rhino horn as it is favoured and valued by those they want to impress They have already made a conscious decision to purchase rhino horn even though they know it is illegal Doak adds We need a combination of enhanced law enforcement and demand reduction campaigns to shift attitudes and behaviour against the trend in rhino horn use within the growing middle class in Viet Nam without changing the situation in the end user market the pressure on rhinos will continue to inflate Our new insights on what is

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2013/9/17/pioneering-research-reveals-new-insights-into-the-consumers.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Innovative campaign promotes success from within
    the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday Sep 22 2014 Innovative campaign promotes success from within Ha Noi 22nd September 2014 A groundbreaking campaign is being launched in Viet Nam on World Rhino Day to promote the importance of individual character determination and will as the secrets to success The Strength of Chi campaign is based on the concept of Chi Will within Vietnamese culture signifying the power of what lies within The Chi campaign promotes the notion that success masculinity and good luck flow from an individual s internal strength of character and refutes the view that these traits come from a piece of horn The most charismatic and successful men create their own good fortune is the essence of the campaign The Chi campaign is a new approach to tackling the illegal practice of buying and using rhino horn and reinforces the leadership shown by Viet Nam to proactively reduce illegal trade and consumption of rhino horn and fulfill its obligations under the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES said Dr Naomi Doak Coordinator of TRAFFIC s Greater Mekong Programme The global decline of rhino populations is of grave concern and impacts natural ecosystems deprives local communities of their livelihoods and only serves to line the pockets of criminals Dr Doak added Developed by TRAFFIC in partnership with PSI a global social marketing organization the Chi campaign represents best practices in behavior change communication techniques including use of multiple communication channels to target urban men aged 35 50 in the two main cities of Ho Chi Minh City and Ha Noi Using local insights values and creative approaches the Chi campaign celebrates the significance of the Chi concept within Vietnamese culture and promotes the reality that dynamic and impressive individuals do not need a piece of horn to prove their prosperity luck or strength says Josselyn Neukom Country Director of PSI Results from a number of independent focus groups indicate that messaging created exclusively for the Chi campaign will resonate with the target group and also have a profound effect in reshaping public views about use of Rhino Horn As Mr Long a successful 45 year old businessman living in Hanoi explained I love the Chí logo and tagline It is extremely powerful I get it and it s very Vietnamese Another 42 year old businessman from HCMC explained Since these concepts power charisma and luck come from what I do myself this campaign makes me feel good as a man Illegal wildlife trade remains one of the greatest threats to biodiversity with a number of the world s iconic species currently facing unprecedented threats from poaching for

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/9/22/innovative-campaign-promotes-success-from-within.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Alarming upsurge in rhino poaching
    the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Wednesday Jun 06 2007 Alarming upsurge in rhino poaching Rhino horns are highly valuable and traded internationally mainly for use in traditional medicines c WWF Canon Martin Harvey Click to enlarge The Hague The Netherlands 6 June 2007 An increase in the volume of rhino horn entering illegal trade from Africa since 2000 could be placing some rhino populations at serious risk according to new research from TRAFFIC the wildlife trade monitoring network Poaching is most severe in Zimbabwe and the Democratic Republic of Congo DRC where 60 of the rhino population was illegally killed between 2003 and 2005 In Zimbabwe poaching accounted for two thirds of all rhino mortalities over the same period affecting one in eight animals and some key populations are in decline Both DRC and Zimbabwe have the poorest record for seizing rhino horns in the illegal trade with just 13 and 8 of lost horns recovered in DRC and Zimbabwe respectively between 2000 and 2005 Across Africa as a whole law enforcement agencies recovered 42 of horns entering illegal trade Rhino horns are shipped to illegal markets mainly in Asia and the Middle East where they are used as traditional medicines and to make traditional dagger handles East and Southeast Asia and Yemen are important destinations and trade appears to be on the increase since 2000 According to TRAFFIC this matches

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2007/6/6/alarming-upsurge-in-rhino-poaching.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - International rhino task force to combat illegal poaching and trade
    save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Wednesday Aug 20 2008 International rhino task force to combat illegal poaching and trade CITES is establishing a Task Force to counter rising levels of rhino poaching Click photo to enlarge Martin Harvey WWF Canon Cambridge UK 20 August 2008 The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES is establishing a Rhinoceros Enforcement Task Force to counter rising levels of rhino poaching and illicit horn trade in Asia and Africa The move follows a report from the CITES Secretariat expressing concerns over reports of increasing poaching and illegal trade in rhinoceros horn and the highly organized nature of these activities The report noted that considerable profits appear to be involved in rhino poaching with strong grounds to suspect the involvement of money laundering TRAFFIC and WWF welcomed the initiative Countries in Asia and Africa are up against an insidious organized illegal rhino horn trade which can only be stopped through the formation of the rhino task force said Dr Susan Lieberman Head of WWF International s Species Programme Despite some noteworthy enforcement successes in southern Africa and South Asia the plight of rhinos in Asia and Africa is growing ever more alarming In Zimbabwe currently around 70 of all detected rhino deaths are of animals killed illegally a particularly worrying statistic given there are effectively no new safe areas to move animals to In Asia poachers have targeted rhinos in Indian national parks with more than 35 rhinos killed in and around Kaziranga National Park in Assam since 2007 and rhino populations in Orang also being poached The sudden upsurge in rhino killings is a major challenge for regional enforcement agencies and the Army has been called in for support WWF and TRAFFIC are also co ordinating emergency support Between 2000 and 2006 over 130 rhinos were killed in various parts of Nepal With civil unrest affecting large parts of the country poachers apparently took advantage of the situation The country has now taken up strict measures to combat poaching and illegal trade and has stressed the importance of involving local communities in anti poaching activities A TRAFFIC report released at the 14th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to CITES last year had warned of increases in the volume of rhino horn entering illegal trade from Africa since 2000 with poaching most severe in Zimbabwe and the Democratic Republic of Congo DRC More than 60 of the rhino population in DRC was illegally killed between 2003 and 2005 In Zimbabwe poaching accounted for two thirds of all rhino mortalities over the same period

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/8/20/international-rhino-task-force-to-combat-illegal-poaching-an.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - CITES backs better rhino protection measures
    weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday Mar 22 2010 CITES backs better rhino protection measures Governments meeting at CITES agreed to better protection measures for rhinos Click photo to enlarge Martin Harvey WWF Canon Doha Qatar 22 March 2010 Countries with rhino populations agreed to focus on increasing law enforcement training of guards strengthening border controls improving rhino population monitoring creating awareness raising campaigns in consumer countries such as Viet Nam and rooting out organized crime syndicates that are behind the increase in poaching and illegal trade The agreement was made at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES meeting currently underway in Doha Qatar and comes amid a global rhino poaching crisis We congratulate the countries gathered at CITES for their united commitment to eradicate rhino poaching said Dr Joseph Okori co ordinator of WWF s African Rhino Conservation Programme The political will shown at this meeting can help save rhinos in both Africa and Asia if it is backed by conservation programmes on the ground and with good law enforcement Rhino poaching worldwide hit a 15

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2010/3/22/cites-backs-better-rhino-protection-measures.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - South African delegates visit Viet Nam to address illegal rhino horn trade
    details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Wednesday Oct 20 2010 South African delegates visit Viet Nam to address illegal rhino horn trade South African officials are visiting Viet Nam to dicuss ways to tackle the crisis which this year has seen one rhino poached every 30 hours in South Africa Click photo to enlarge Michel Gunther WWF Canon Ha Noi Viet Nam 20th October 2010 This week five representatives from South Africa are in Viet Nam to discuss ways to address the growing illegal trade in rhinoceros horn from South Africa to Viet Nam The delegation represents key government departments involved in monitoring and enforcement in the rhino trade in South Africa They will meet with Vietnamese counterparts in Ha Noi and Ho Chi Minh City to learn more about national policies and how cases of illegal horn trade are dealt with in Viet Nam The aim of the trip facilitated by TRAFFIC is to increase collaborative law enforcement between the two nations in order to stop the illegal trade in rhino horn South Africa has lost nearly 230 rhinos so far this year one rhino every 30 hours the worst conservation crisis over the last two decades It s vitally important to scale up Africa s law enforcement efforts and link with Asia in the fight to save the world s rhinos says Tom Milliken Regional Director for TRAFFIC in East and Southern Africa We ll only win this war if both sides align against the criminal syndicates behind this trade Viet Nam has been increasingly implicated as a main driver of the illegal rhino horn trade in Asia and a major trade route has emerged connecting illegally killed rhinos in South Africa with consumers in Viet Nam In 2008 a Vietnamese diplomat working for the embassy in South Africa was filmed making an illegal purchase of rhino horn In another incident a Vietnamese man was sentenced in July 2010 to three years in prison for trying to smuggle five horns weighing 18 kg through Ho Chi Minh City s international airport While Asian rhinoceros have likely been extirpated in Viet Nam in part due to poaching for their horns there are still important wild populations of rhinoceroses in Africa especially South Africa where about 90 of all rhinos are found Some ownership of rhino horns from trophy hunting is allowed under strict regulations but it is illegal to trade the horns commercially In Viet Nam the lack of a system to register and track privately owned horns could be allowing them to enter the trade illegally Throughout parts of Asia rhino horn is believed to cure a range of ailments with some claims that it can cure cancer In Viet

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2010/10/20/south-african-delegates-visit-viet-nam-to-address-illegal-rh.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - South African and Vietnamese officials meet to discuss rhino poaching crisis
    News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday Sep 26 2011 South African and Vietnamese officials meet to discuss rhino poaching crisis Photo Michel Gunther WWF Canon Johannesburg South Africa 26th September 2011 Five government officials from Viet Nam are on an official visit to South Africa this week to discuss the illegal trade in rhinoceros horn Their visit is set against a backdrop of rapidly escalating poaching of Africa s two internationally protected rhino species From 1990 to 2007 South Africa lost an average of 13 rhinos to poaching each year but in 2008 the number shot up to 72 animals killed for their horns The figure rose to 122 in 2009 and again in 2010 to an unprecedented 333 dead This year more than 302 animals have already been illegally killed a rate that may push the total number to over 400 rhinos in 2011 if the poaching onslaught is not halted The rhino horn is smuggled to Asia where there is strong evidence that Vi et Nam is one of the key destinations and a primary driver of the illicit trade Last month two Vietnamese citizens were sentenced to eight and 12 years in prison respectively by a South African magistrate for attempting to smuggle rhino horn out of the country In addition to poaching of live animals in Africa the demand from Asia has led to a spate of thefts of antique rhino horn from museums and zoos across Europe by organized criminal gangs Rhino horn is used in traditional Asian medicine in the treatment of high fever but a new belief has emerged claiming rhino horn has curative powers against cancer a notion that may have developed in Viet Nam However there is no scientific or medical evidence to support any such claims Rhino horn is similar in composition and structure to horses hooves birds beaks and human fingernails This week s visit of Vietnamese government officials to South Africa follows the October 2010 mission of a five member South African delegation to Ha Noi and Ho Chi Minh City to discuss rhino horn trafficking between the two countries At the meeting in South Africa representatives are aiming to agree on and sign a bilateral Memorandum of Understanding MOU to create a mechanism under which Viet Nam and South Africa can actively collaborate to stop the illegal trade in rhino horn

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2011/9/26/south-african-and-vietnamese-officials-meet-to-discuss-rhino.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive



  •