archive-org.com » ORG » T » TRAFFIC.ORG

Total: 219

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - South Africa and Viet Nam to co-operate on protection of wildlife
    Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Sep 30 2011 South Africa and Viet Nam to co operate on protection of wildlife Joint concern over the poaching of rhinos has led to South Africa and Viet Nam s announcement this week to co operate on enhancing wildlife protection measures Click image to enlarge Y J Rey Millet WWF Canon Johannesburg South Africa 30th September 2011 South Africa and Viet Nam formally agreed on a process to sign a Memorandum of Understanding MoU to collaborate on natural resource management wildlife protection and law enforcement At a joint press conference on Wednesday Mr Fundisile Mketeni Deputy Director General of Biodiversity and Conservation in the South African Department of Environmental Affairs and Dr Ha Cong Tuan Deputy Director General Viet Nam Forestry Administration announced technical agreement on promoting co operation between the two countries to enhance wildlife protection law enforcement and compliance with CITES The announcement came following a bilateral meeting that was facilitated by TRAFFIC to discuss the issue of rhino poaching and illegal trade in rhino horn between the two countries Viet Nam has been identified as the primary destination for rhino horns illegally coming from South Africa where government officials announced that the death toll had

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2011/9/30/south-africa-and-viet-nam-to-co-operate-on-protection-of-wil.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive


  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Mozambique commits to tackling wildlife crime
    at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Tuesday Jul 30 2013 Mozambique commits to tackling wildlife crime Illegal ivory shipment from Mozambique seized in Thailand officials from Mozambique last week committed to stepping up their efforts to address illegal ivory trade WWF Canon James Morgan Maputo Mozambique 30th July 2013 Under increasing pressure from CITES neighbouring South Africa and the international conservation community Mozambican government officials have committed to escalate their responses towards tackling wildlife crime particularly elephant and rhino poaching Mozambique recognises the economic and security threats from trans boundary criminal networks undertaking these activities and the country is committed to finding solutions to these problems said Marcelino Foloma Head of Mozambique s Wildlife Department at the Ministry of Agriculture Hosted by TRAFFIC and the Mozambican National Directorate of Land and Forestry the three day workshop was attended by representatives from several ministries including Agriculture Tourism Customs Finance Home Affairs and Environmental Co ordination The event afforded a key opportunity to improve communication and collaboration between governmental institutions and civil society to address serious defects in current wildlife legislation and to establish formal mechanisms for sharing information about illegal wildlife trade and taking law enforcement actions TRAFFIC also rolled out a series of species identification materials in the Portuguese language to assist Mozambique s law enforcement community to identify contraband wildlife products including elephant ivory rhino horn lion bone pangolins and several protected timber species This is the first time Mozambique s law enforcement community is equipped with species identification materials in their own language said Tom Milliken TRAFFIC elephant and rhino coordinator who attended the workshop It s critical that these valuable tools are available to fight increasing wildlife crime Discussions also focussed on how Mozambique can meet conditions imposed upon it at the recent meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES that took place in Thailand in March 2013 To avoid CITES trade sanctions Mozambique must amend its legislation and make the illegal killing of elephants and rhino and possession of ivory and rhino horn criminal offences with significant judicial penalties The country also needs beefed up law enforcement actions to control the illicit movement of wildlife products in the country and at its borders Mozambique is due to submit a detailed progress report to the Convention s Secretariat by January 2014 Aside from the direct threat to Mozambique s wildlife criminal networks operating with impunity in southern Africa are also threatening to undermine national security and the region s vital tourism industry said Anabela Rodrigues WWF Mozambique Country Director This week s meeting coincided with an announcement from the South African Department of Environmental

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2013/7/30/mozambique-commits-to-tackling-wildlife-crime.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Nailing the rhino horn trade in Viet Nam
    awareness l Enforcement International Agreements CBD l CITES l CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday May 10 2013 Nailing the rhino horn trade in Viet Nam Vietnam 10 May 2013 In support of TRAFFIC and WWF s campaign to tackle the illegal trade of rhino horn to and within Viet Nam a Public Service Announcement PSA has been developed that will run on State owned television channels and cinemas in Viet Nam and will be prominently displayed on local and international social media platforms The demand for this product primarily in Viet Nam as well as in other Asian countries resulted

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2013/5/10/nailing-the-rhino-horn-trade-in-viet-nam.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Ministry of Health joins efforts to save rhinos: Call to cease use of rhino horn for medical purposes
    medicine practitioners academics and MoH representatives will be involved in discussions on ways to share the message to say No to rhino horn consumption At the workshops the participants received information and discussed a number of topics including the reality of illegal trade particularly referring to the current rhino poaching crisis the historical use of rhino horn in traditional medicine effective alternatives and the current laws covering rhino horn in Viet Nam Dr Naomi Doak Coordinator of TRAFFIC s Greater Mekong Programme presented to the May 7th workshop on details of the current rhino poaching crisis According to South Africa s Department of Environmental Affairs a devastating total of 1004 rhinos were killed in 2013 and as of April 11th 2014 277 have already been killed in South Africa Consumption in Asian countries including Viet Nam and China has been identified as one of the main reasons for the escalating poaching numbers and the current crisis facing these animals The workshop on the 7th and the coming one on the 16th provided the opportunity for Dr Doak to present a summary of recent consumer research commissioned as part of the WWF TRAFFIC Global Campaign on Illegal Wildlife Trade to identify the main consumer groups of this illegal product and the motivations behind the purchasing decision and consumption The research highlighted belief in the medical properties of rhino horn as one of the underlying motivations for buying and using this illegal product Professor Dr Hoang Bao Chau former director of the National Institute of Traditional Medicine made a presentation during the May 7th workshop which supported the one prepared by Professor Dr Nguyen Chan Hung President of the Cancer Association of Viet Nam emphasizing that rhino horn cannot cure cancer Additionally Associate Professor Dr Tran Luu Van Hien Head of the Traditional Medicine Experimental Laboratory at the National Hospital of Traditional Medicine presented alternative remedies including various herbs During the afternoon discussion at the Ha Noi workshop the participants agreed to the drafting of a recommendation by the Traditional Medicine Administration to be submitted to the MoH before sending to all provinces and Traditional Medicine Associations with the message to say No to the use of rhino horn and other endangered species in an effort to assist in their conservation There was also unanimous acknowledgement that there is no evidence to support the myth that rhino horn can cure cancer Next steps include a discussion to identify the best way to communicate this message to people consuming rhino horn for medical purposes TRAFFIC is working closely with the Ministry of Health to develop the recommendation We are extremely pleased to see the commitment of the Ministry towards the fight to save rhinos and the strong steps being taken to ensure existing regulations and commitments are adhered to said Dr Naomi Doak We are at a turning point for these animals and without working together we could well face a world without them she added According to Professor Dr Hoang Bao Chau

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/5/15/ministry-of-health-joins-efforts-to-save-rhinos-call-to-ceas.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Business community encouraged to protect wildlife by Viet Nam Chamber of Commerce and Industry and TRAFFIC
    Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Apr 24 2015 Business community encouraged to protect wildlife by Viet Nam Chamber of Commerce and Industry and TRAFFIC Signing the MoU TRAFFIC Hanoi 24th April 2015 To empower the business community in Viet Nam to lead the fight against illegal wildlife trade and consumption the Viet Nam Chamber of Commerce and Industry VCCI in collaboration with TRAFFIC is equipping business leaders with the tools they need to become champions of wildlife protection through corporate social responsibility CSR training VCCI and TRAFFIC the wildlife trade monitoring network today signed a strategic Memorandum of Understanding MoU supporting the roll out of best practices in corporate ethics and consumer behaviour change as well as a zero tolerance approach toward wildlife consumption through CSR Through enhancing capacity for Vietnamese businesses this partnership contributes to global efforts to eradicate illegal wildlife trade and to ensure that the trade in wild plants and animals is not a threat to the conservation of nature Business leaders in Viet Nam are role models for their peers colleagues friends and family so we believe they have the power to help protect wildlife through reducing demand for endangered species said Mrs Madelon Willemsen Head of TRAFFIC s office in Viet Nam Along with raising awareness about wildlife protection the partnership between VCCI and TRAFFIC will improve the governance practice and social responsibility of enterprises in Viet Nam The two organizations will co develop innovative social marketing messages to address illegal wildlife trade and consumption then implement joint communications activities to disseminate those messages These activities will aim to enhance management capability social responsibility and business ethics with the goal of instilling social responsibility and reducing the consumption of endangered wildlife products such as rhino horn TRAFFIC will contribute to building capacity for VCCI s trainers and staff in social marketing and enhancing management capability for Vietnamese enterprises According to a 2014 Nielsen report there has been a shift in consumer interests towards brands showing leadership in social and environmental responsibility which includes a zero tolerance to wildlife consumption In Viet Nam in particular the majority of consumers 73 percent partners and investors are eager to support brands committed to acting ethically and legally so VCCI members adopting wildlife CSR measures may see an increase in support Demand for rhino horn in some Asian countries including Viet Nam is one of the main drivers of the poaching crisis in

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2015/4/24/business-community-encouraged-to-protect-wildlife-by-viet-na.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Meeting to expand the role of wildlife detector dogs in Asia
    email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Wednesday Jan 07 2015 Meeting to expand the role of wildlife detector dogs in Asia A detector dog receives its reward a white towel for a successful live demonstration TRAFFIC Ruili Guangxi China In December 2014 the inaugural World Customs Organization WCO Asia Pacific Regional Customs seminar on the use and training of detector dogs took place at Ruili Detector Dog Base China The meeting which took place in co operation with TRAFFIC was part of international efforts to expand the number of wildlife detector dogs in use in Asia and to increase the range of products they can detect Some 40 Customs officials from Russia Australia New Zealand Hong Kong SAR Viet Nam Myanmar Lao PDR Thailand China plus representatives from the WCO Secretariat the WCO Asia Pacific Regional Intelligence Liaison Office RILO and TRAFFIC attended Mr Pierre Bertrand of the WCO Secretariat spoke about the increasing use of wildlife detector dogs worldwide including a European Commission scheme to establish detector dog programmes throughout EU Member States Customs Officials from China spoke about the history successes challenges and solutions in training dogs to detect everything from drugs to explosives tobacco and wildlife products In 2014 a dog named Jin Kai that was trained through a joint project between Ruili Drug Detector Dog Base and TRAFFIC in 2013 uncovered 16 cases of wildlife smuggling a total of 15 kg of ivory pangolin scales and rhino horns according to Guangzhou Customs A Ruili trained detector dog checks a suitcase Wayne Wu TRAFFIC Currently four wildlife detector dogs are being trained at Ruili Base with support from TRAFFIC for deployment in Xinjiang province where they will target key wildlife products including Saiga horns Tiger and leopard parts Chengdu Customs have also visited Ruili with the aim of establishing a wildlife detector dog team in Chengdu Shuangliu International Airport the fourth largest airport in China A practical demonstration of the extraordinary ability of trained dogs to detect Tiger bones and drugs in luggage handbags and cars took place during the meeting Detector dogs are already used across several of the countries represented at the meeting while all participants expressed their interest in the use of dogs as an innovative means of combatting wildlife crime Southeast Asian countries are among the most important source areas for

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2015/1/7/meeting-to-expand-the-role-of-wildlife-detector-dogs-in-asia.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Dogs of war: Labradors on the wildlife crime frontline
    Anti smuggling Policeman who took Jin Kai to his luggage where another positive reaction led the officers to open the suitcase In it they found ivory necklaces pangolin scales and other endangered animal products weighing a total of 500 g These are the first seizures of endangered wildlife goods made by Customs Officers in China thanks to the services of a detector dog and a sure sign that the ability of trained dogs to locate concealed smuggled wildlife goods is beginning to pay dividends in the battle against wildlife traffickers How Jin Kai became one of China s first wildlife detector dogs Jin Kai and Jin Li Wayne Wu TRAFFIC The first official wildlife detector dogs Jin Kai left as an 18 month old female dog with Jin Li right a three year old male Both are Labrador Retrievers a breed often seen in movies and kept as pets because they are friendly towards people playful and intelligent However Jin Kai and Jin Li are neither pets nor movie stars They are detector dogs fighting on the frontline to combat wildlife trafficking For five months from March to July 2013 Jin Kai Jin Li and another Labrador Duo Wei received specialized training at Ruili Drug Detector Dog Base run by the Anti smuggling Bureau of Customs General Administration They later graduated to become the first wildlife detector dogs to go into service with Chinese Customs with Jin Kai entering service at Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport in December 2013 Jin Kai during training Wayne Wu TRAFFIC What defines a wildlife detector dog Wildlife detector dogs are trained to discover endangered wildlife products that are hidden during transportation for example concealed in passengers baggage or inside postal packages Dogs can fairly easily be trained to find drugs explosives tobacco and other contraband but wildlife products generally do not have obvious odours so the detector dogs must be extremely focused Motivation and high levels of concentration are essential qualities Not every breed of dog or even every Labrador has the necessary qualities to become a wildlife detector dog Jin Li checking baggage Wayne Wu TRAFFIC Why use detector dogs Many criminals engage in illegal wildlife trade because of the high profits and low risk of detection and punishment and China is a major destination in the global trade In recent years many illegal endangered wildlife goods have been seized by Customs officials entering China including ivory tiger leopard rhino horn and marine turtle products Just as illegal wildlife trade has grown in response to rising demand so have the methods used by smugglers to avoid detection diversified with Criminals sometimes hiding contraband in their luggage in parcels and even on their body China first examined the use of detector dogs to find wildlife goods following a meeting held in Beijing facilitated by TRAFFIC where some of the world s leading experts on the training and use of wildlife detector dogs participated Following this meeting China Customs Anti smuggling Bureau in co operation with

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/4/17/dogs-of-war-labradors-on-the-wildlife-crime-frontline.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Call for rhino programme to be extended
    PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Mar 14 2008 Call for rhino programme to be extended CITES has been key to the recovery of rhino populations in parts of Africa but increased organized poaching is an ongoing concern WWF Canon Martin Harvey Click photo to enlarge Cambridge UK Numbers of African rhinos have recovered spectacularly in parts of Africa and there are calls for the successes to be repeated elsewhere The calls come as government wildlife eco tourism and community representatives from across southern Africa meet on the tenth anniversary of WWF s African Rhino Programme At the time of its formation there were 8 466 White Rhinos and 2 599 Black Rhinos in the wild Today the figures are 14 500 and 4 000 respectively The Programme currently operates in South Africa Namibia Kenya and Zimbabwe but is seeking to extend its operations to more of Africa Work on rhino trade issues conducted by TRAFFIC the wildlife trade monitoring network forms part of the WWF African Rhino Programme What we have shown is that in partnership with governments and communities and business it is possible to stave off extinction for the rhino in some of its former range said Dr Susan Lieberman WWF International s Global Species Programme Director Black rhino numbers across Africa fell from an estimated 65 000 in the 1970s to around 2 400 in 1995 largely due to poaching for their horns which were shipped to lucrative markets in the Middle East and Asia Relentless hunting by European settlers saw African rhino numbers plummet and the Southern White Rhino was thought to be extinct by the late 19th century Key to the recovery of both species was the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES which has enabled a combination of regulatory and incentive measures In 1977 both species were listed in Appendix I of CITES prohibiting all international trade in rhino parts and products Populations of White Rhino in South Africa and Swaziland have since been moved to Appendix II where limited sustainable use options have provided economic incentives for further investment in rhino conservation However in June 2007 a TRAFFIC report presented to CITES parties showed an increase in the

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/3/14/call-for-rhino-programme-to-be-extended.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive



  •