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  • TRAFFIC - TRAFFIC and CITES
    for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Our work TRAFFIC and CITES A TRAFFIC priority is to promote international co operation to address wildlife trade issues with particular emphasis on CITES the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora and CBD the Convention on Biological Diversity TRAFFIC provides information and assistance to help the decision making processes at CITES supporting efforts to ensure that international wildlife trade is at sustainable levels and does not pose a threat to the conservation of species In 1999 the two organizations signed a memorandum of understanding PDF 24 KB with the purpose to undertake joint activities for capacity building Conference of the Parties CoP Former CITES Secretary General Willem Wijnstekers speaking at the opening of CoP14 in The Hague Netherlands Roughly every 3 years a meeting takes place of those governments Parties who have joined CITES These meetings are called Conference of the Parties CoP At a CoP Parties decide what modifications are needed to the Convention and its Appendices Proposals Proposals and Agenda documents are put forward by Parties who have trade issues to discuss and these are either adopted rejected or modified following discussion amongst the government delegates present Analyses and Recommendations Together with our partner IUCN The International Union for Conservation of Nature TRAFFIC publishes in depth Analyses of all the formal Proposals put forward by Parties to be discussed at CoP TRAFFIC publishes its Recommendations on each decision to be taken based on the results of these Analyses The Analyses and Recommendations for each of the recent CoPs can be found by clicking on the relevant links below CoP reports You can find TRAFFIC reports and other information on most CoPs by following the links below Official documents for most meetings can be found on the CITES website CoP16 Bangkok Thailand 3 14 Mar 2013 CoP15 Doha Qatar 13 25 Mar 2010 CoP14 The Hague Netherlands 3 15 Jun 2007 CoP13 Bangkok Thailand 2 14 Oct 2004 CoP12 Santiago Chile 3 15 Nov 2002 CoP11 Gigiri Kenya 10 20 Apr 2000 CoP10 Harare Zimbabwe 9 20 Jun 1997 CoP9 Fort Lauderdale USA 7 18 Nov 1994 TRAFFIC report PDF

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/cites/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Networks
    origins lie in a meeting that took place in Jaipur India in 2008 where environmental ministers from eight countries in the region announced their intention of forming a regional wildlife enforcement network and called for the establishment of a South Asia Experts Group on illegal wildlife trade SAWEN was formally launched in 2011 The eight member countries are Afghanistan Bangladesh Bhutan India Maldives Nepal Pakistan and Sri Lanka and the headquarters are in Nepal SAWEN broadly aims to foster an awareness of the issues and implications of wildlife trade across countries by sharing information and developing joint strategies to assist in combating illegal trade networks In particular it aims to Identify trade hotspots and priority species Undertake analysis of trade routes Strengthen links between field and policy co ordination Encourage better communication across key stakeholders Support the strengthening of appropriate national legislation Examples of TRAFFIC s engagement with SAWEN Since its inception TRAFFIC has been providing technical support to SAWEN to assist with the countering of illegal wildlife trade in the region In 2012 SAWEN s first regional meeting took place attended by officials from all eight member countries alongside experts from other wildlife enforcement networks such as ASEAN WEN and NGOs including TRAFFIC In 2014 TRAFFIC provided expert input and helped to organize a meeting where a statute outlining SAWEN s visions and goals were adopted Central American Wildlife Enforcement Network ROAVIS or CAWEN The need for a wildlife enforcement network in Central America was first identified in 2010 following a meeting of relevant government representatives in El Salvador From this La Red de Observancia y Aplicación de la Normativa de Vida Silvestre de Centroamérica y República Dominicana ROAVIS was created later the same year Aims of ROAVIS include Strengthen co operation between ROAVIS members Co ordinate training for administrative officials regarding wildlife legislation Create national networks to allow effective implementation and enforcement of wildlife legislation Promote and maintain partnerships between governmental and non governmental organizations A link to the executive summary of Second Meeting and Workshop of ROAVIS In 2015 members of ROAVIS took part in regional training and capacity building workshops designed to strengthen inter regional collaboration at which TRAFFIC provided input and Spanish language materials Central African Forests Commission COMIFAC Created in 1999 by the Yaoundé Declaration COMIFAC is made up of 10 member countries Burundi Cameroon Congo Gabon Equatorial Guinea Chad Rwanda Central African Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo and Sao Tome and Principe It is the principle political and technical forum for guidance and coordination in the sustainable management of forest and savannah ecosystems and also plays a significant role in the Congo Basin Forest Partnership CBFP The COMIFAC Convergence plan is at the heart of this enforcement network and looks to facilitate the sustainable and joint management of forest resources The plan has several key themes including broadening knowledge of the resource develop funding mechanisms and improve management of ecosystems and reforestation Examples of TRAFFIC s engagement with COMIFAC In 2008 TRAFFIC

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/networks/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - medicinal-plants
    need to discontinue or reformulate products investment in sustainable sourcing particularly when coupled with fair trade can enhance a company s corporate image This is reinforced by growing consumer awareness of and demand for ethical products Governments are also increasingly recognizing the economic importance of wild product trade and so keen to address sustainability issues and ensure product quality through more transparent supply chains Groups promoting alternative livelihoods based on commercialization of non timber forest products have also come to realize that success relies on stable supplies as well as stable or growing markets TRAFFIC s engagement to date Although numerous conservation organizations cite the importance of medicinal plants as a reason to conserve biodiversity more generally it has been TRAFFIC IUCN and WWF who have led efforts to address sustainability and equity issues associated with commercial trade We have successfully informed and engaged a wide variety of stakeholders in the development of tools to reduce over exploitation including the WHO IUCN WWF TRAFFIC Guidelines on the Conservation of Medicinal Plants in prep the CBD Global Strategy for Plant Conservation and the FairWild Standard FairWild Standard development was led by TRAFFIC WWF IUCN the German Federal Agency for Nature Conservation BfN and others and involved extensive consultation with representatives from government private sector academia NGOs and certification agencies history of FairWild Standard development Initially known as the International Standard for Sustainable Wild Collection of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants ISSC MAP it was merged with an existing initiative in 2008 and the FairWild Standard Version 2 0 now provides a reference and best practice framework for sustainable wild collection and trade The ISSC MAP Standard was tested for applicability to community resource management in pilot projects in six countries Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Cambodia India Nepal and Lesotho Lessons learned were published in a report Wild for a Cure launched in September 2010 FairWild sustainable use projects continue in various regions around the world see TRAFFIC s Medicinal and Aromatic plants news updates and FairWild activities section for details and updates Watch Healing Power from Nature a short video about the importance of medicinal plants and the FairWild Standard The FairWild Standard is maintained by the FairWild Foundation a Swiss based charity in which TRAFFIC is a partner Specifically designed to be relevant to the private sector civil society organizations and governments alike the Standard and associated guidance tools see e g FairWild Standard in Practice PDF 200 KB are being used by industry to inform their product sourcing guidelines by governments and inter governmental organizations in designing harvest and trade controls and by communities in their management systems The Standard forms the basis of a third party audited certification system complementing organic and fair trade certification processes which typically lack mechanisms for certifying that wild harvest levels are sustainable The FairWild Standard s principles and approach are being used by a growing number of herbal product food and other companies dependent on wild sourced botanicals and by governments keen to

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  • TRAFFIC - Protecting rhinos
    restoring rhinoceros populations in Zimbabwe The Zimbabwean authorities are taking such crimes more seriously however with a poacher gaoled for 17 years in 2010 and there has been a significant decline in the number of rhinos poached in Zimbabwe between 2010 52 animals and 2013 16 animals rising once more to at least 50 in 2015 Zambia In March 2009 Zambi Wildlife Authority arrested four people including two police officers over their involvement in the smuggling of 72 elephant ivory and five rhinoceros horn pieces while four Zambian nationals were arrested by Zimbabwe on suspicion of rhino poaching Namibia Although in 2009 two men appeared in court charged with attempting to sell rhinoceros horns Namibia largely escaped the rhino poaching crisis until 2014 when levels began to rise with media reporting a loss of 24 rhinos that year rising sharply to 80 in 2015 Kenya Kenya has the third largest population of both Black and White Rhinos totalling just over 1 000 animals Although the poaching wave was slow to reach East Africa heavy investment in on the ground patrolling in game reserves has undoubtedly helped deter poachers in Kenya Despite these efforts a total of 35 rhinos were poached in Kenya in 2014 falling to 11 in 2015 Democratic Republic of Congo Rhinoceroses are believed extinct the most recent sighting of a live wild Northern White Rhinoceros was in 2006 just 4 individuals remain all in captivity Mozambique Rhinos no longer occur in Mozambique owing to poaching pressure but the shared common border with neighbouring Kruger National Park in South Africa coupled with weak legislation and poor enforcement makes the country a favoured base for poaching gangs to enter South Africa to kill rhinos Mozambique is also a major exit point for rhino horn leaving the African continent en route to Asia The Standing Committee of CITES requested Mozambique to develop and implement a detailed national rhino action plan Despite these measures rhino poaching and horn trafficking remain serious problems as exemplified by a seizure of 65 rhino horns and 1 1 tonnes of elephant ivory in May 2015 following a police raid in Maputo Subsequently 12 rhino horns from this seizure were stolen from a police storeroom and at least 7 individuals four of them police officers arrested in connection with the theft However in July 2015 the Mozambican authorities destroyed the confiscated ivory and rhino horn before any cases in connection with the events had come to court An April 2012 graphic illustrating rhino numbers and the poaching crisis and more information about Javan and Sumatran Rhinos both graphics by Memuco Rhinoceros horn demand Global threat There is a huge global demand for rhinoceros horn mainly for use as a status symbol by wealthy businessmen in Asia particularly Viet Nam see below meaning that all sources are at risk International crime syndicates are targeting museums and other sites where rhinoceros horn is stored for example in June 2009 five armed men held up security guards in Addo Elephant National Park and made off with 10 kg of rhinoceros horns an auctioneer in the UK who stole a client s rhinoceros horn and sold it to dealers in the Far East was given a suspended prison sentenced and fined in December 2009 in January 2010 Customs officials at Shannon Airport in Ireland seized 10 rhinoceros horns in February 2012 a trio was suspected of stealing a rhinoceros horn in Vienna Austria and was also wanted in connection with the murder of a possible witness to their crime in May 2014 the leader of an international crime ring trading in rhinoceros horn was jailed in the US for almost six years after pleading guilty to charges of smuggling in December 2014 13 men were charged with plotting to steal rhinoceros horns amongst other items from auction houses and museums across Europe From September 2010 the UK Government announced a ban on the export of rhinoceros horn after evidence of antique rhinoceros horn and horn products being legally imported from across Europe for re sale in the UK then exported often to East Asia Demand from Asia Rhinoceros horn traffickers have been arrested in Viet Nam and China including Hong Kong and there have also been arrests of traffickers with links to Myanmar Malaysia and Taiwan Rhinoceros horns have been seized from shipments to mainland China including Hong Kong 1 and Thailand The recent upsurge in rhinoceros poaching is closely linked to increased demand for rhinoceros horn in Asia especially Viet Nam and through TRAFFIC s work as far back as June 2007 Vietnamese citizens have been linked to the illegal trade of rhinoceros horn from South Africa Related incidents include the following in June 2008 five White Rhinoceros horns weighing nearly 18 kgs were seized from a Vietnamese man at Tan Son Nhat Airport another man believed to be Vietnamese was arrested in Pretoria in South Africa in April 2009 after rhinoceros body parts were found at his home in August 2011 a Vietnamese man found guilty of illegally possessing 12 rhinoceros horns received a 12 year prison sentence Vietnamese citizens have been involved in pseudo hunts whereby legal sport hunts of White Rhinoceroses are used to obtain horn for commercial use in Viet Nam two Vietnamese nationals were arrested at Johannesburg s O R Tambo International Airport in December 2011 attempting to smuggle two rhinoceros horns in January 2013 Vietnamese citizens were detained in Bangkok and Ho Chi Minh City trying to smuggle rhino horn into Vietnam in May 2015 after being arrested in Viet Nam with 31 rhino horns weighing 37kg two men were prosecuted for violating animal protection regulations in June 2015 three men were convicted of illegally exporting rhinoceros horns from the Czech Republic to Viet Nam and a further charge was brought against a Czech Vietnamese group for the export of rhino horns Where does the demand originate In 2013 a ground breaking study was commissioned by TRAFFIC to identify the consumers of rhino

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/rhinos/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Sharks and rays
    Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Oceanic whitetip Carcharinus longimanus sharks before auction at Negombo fish market Sri Lanka WWF Canon Andy Cornish Sharks Rays Restoring the Balance Modern forms of sharks and rays first emerged over 150 million years ago But the introduction of modern fishing techniques has spelled disaster for these ancient creatures Irresponsible and unsustainable fishing practices has led to a massive decline in shark numbers a huge jolt to ocean ecosystems in little over 50 years The most serious declines have been in the Coral Triangle and the Mediterranean Many shark species are slow growing late to mature and produce few young making them highly susceptible to over fishing Sharks are caught both for their fins eaten as a delicacy in sharks fin soup in Asia and for their meat with Europe a major market Removal of these key predators from the food chain has serious consequences for marine ecosystems which in turn has repercussions for people everywhere threatening local livelihoods and food security Whale Shark Jürgen Freund WWF Canon Our recent work on sharks rays In 2009 TRAFFIC drew attention to the risks posed to sharks of allowing deepwater gillnetting in waters governed by the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organization SPRFMO The use of such techniques were subsequently banned At the 2013 Conference of the Parties to CITES CITES CoP15 TRAFFIC supported ultimately successful proposals to list seven shark and two manta ray species within the Appendices of the Convention measures that came into force in September 2014 During the period before their entering force TRAFFIC studied the implications of the CITES listings for national agencies implementing the measures developed new methodology for assessing the risk to shark species and also crafted guidelines on making Non Detriment Findings for shark species a pre requisite before CITES export permits can be issued In response to the ongoing threats to sharks and rays in 2014 WWF and TRAFFIC created Sharks Restoring the Balance an initiative aimed at improving the management of shark fisheries reduce demand and move international trade in sharks and rays towards sustainability Information leaflet PDF 1 MB In September 2014 WWF

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  • TRAFFIC - Tigers
    due to human development of land for commercial residential and agricultural use and a lack of sufficient prey due to the pressure placed on habitats by human activity In 1975 Tigers were listed in Appendix I of CITES which prevents their commercial international trade Nevertheless Tigers remain in serious danger from illegal wildlife trade poaching mainly for their bones for use in traditional Asian medicines and for their pelts and other body parts such as teeth skin and claws as decorative items The skin of a Tiger killed by poachers in Nepal Jeff Foott WWF C Many Tigers are also killed because of human tiger conflicts people seeking to protect life and livestock A TRAFFIC survey found body parts from an estimated 23 Tigers on sale in Sumatra where the Critically Endangered population of Tigers is believed to number fewer than 500 animals the last Tigers left in Indonesia In China several operations are engaged in intensive breeding farming of Tigers At least one farm has been found to sell Tiger bone and meat illegally At the 14th Conference of the Parties to CITES delegates called for an end to Tiger farming the production of Tiger products from captive animals Research by TRAFFIC published in Taming the Tiger Trade found that medicinal use of Tiger bone had decreased since China banned Tiger trade in 1993 However the report found that any lifting of the Tiger trade ban would spell disaster for wild Tigers Examples of illegal trade in Tigers In 2010 Viet Nam police uncovered a bone trade network operated by a couple finding 6 compete tiger skeletons alongside a further 32 kg of Tiger bones In 2012 a notorious wildlife dealer was caught with a tiger skin and skeleton amongst other illegal wildlife goods in a collaborative investigation in India In March 2014 police in China arrested a gang of 16 men believed to have killed more than 10 tigers to supply wealthy businessmen and officials In 2014 Thai police seized 5 wild tiger cubs being smuggled to Laos with the ultimate destination thought to be Vietnam or China In February 2015 authorities arrested 3 tiger poachers and seized tiger pelt and 9 kg of skin and bones in Sarolangun Jambi Indonesia The gang was believed to have operated in the area for a long time poaching and selling tigers to parties in West Sumatra Riau and Medan A key aspect of tiger product demand is that the wealth of the buyer tends to drive the demand rather than the poverty of the sellers and traders Tiger products are used for a wide variety of purposes from medicine to meat and are increasingly becoming seen as a status symbol across parts of Asia A Sumatran Tiger P t sumatrae photographed using a camera trap a technique used to monitor Tiger populations in the wild Mike Griffiths WWF Can Conservation A number of initatives are underway aiming to conserve wild Tigers Some examples include The Global Tiger Recovery Program GTRP

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/tigers/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Timber trade
    it also looks to create a co ordinated interregional approach that enables communication and cooperation throughout the region and it is hoped that this will be both between countries and regional bodies Directors of Forestry for Angola Namibia and Zambia l to r Mr Ignatius N Makumba Director of Forestry Zambia Mr Joseph Hailwa Director of Forestry Namibia Mr Domingos Nazaré da Cruz Veloso National Director of Forests Angola In August 2015 a collaborative workshop on timber trade took place in Namibia with Angola Zambia and Namibia all participating Such a meeting facilitated an agreement to develop an action plan on forest management and timber trade across the three countries TRAFFIC supported this workshop alongside the Directorate of Forestry and the Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation IRDNC In South Africa TRAFFIC is helping the government to monitor the timber trade with neighbouring countries including providing capacity building and training for species identification enforcement assistance and advice on how to enhance controls of the trade In September 2014 stakeholders in Madagascar met to discuss the timber trade and how best to carry out harvest and trade in a sustainable manner The workshop was partly convened by TRAFFIC and assessed the laws and policies required as well as outlining the importance of transparency in the industry South America South America contains 21 of the world s forest but has only a limited role in the international timber trade According to a 2013 TRAFFIC report there has been a decline in the proportion of South American wood within the global timber market driven by a variety of factors Efforts are currently underway to create a stable legal supply for wood entering the global marketplace through the implementation of a variety of Action Plans and Programmes TRAFFIC and VERIFOR have been working with local governments civil society organizations and private sector representatives in the Amazonian regions of Ecuador Peru and Bolivia to devise ways to improve forest governance An important principle has been recognizing common problems and building partnerships between stakeholders in the region to tackle them Key has been identifying where the challenges lie in each region and ensuring that local perspectives influence the development of the government led ALFA Application of Forest Legislation in the Amazon process A communications outreach through local radio aims to keep local people in the Amazon region aware of forestry governance issues Valuable lessons have been derived from TRAFFIC s work examining the US Peru Trade Promotion Agreement and its effects on trade liberalization and forest verification TRAFFIC has also provided input into CITES and other fora on the trade in Bigleaf Mahogany PDF 700 KB In March 2011 TRAFFIC produced 24 short videos to form an educational video series designed to explain the issues that Ecuador s forests face and enable people to access this critical information In September 2012 TRAFFIC led a joint workshop with Reforestamos Mexico at the IUCN World Conservation Congress designed to provide information on policy legality and forestry Indigenous communities within the Peruvian Amazon are forming Forestry Oversight watchdogs to oversee the fair and sustainable exploitation of their natural resources TRAFFIC In May 2013 two indigenous communities within Peru formed a Forestry Oversight group to provide an opportunity for the local community to protect their forests by stopping illegal logging and also by enabling them to command a fair price for any timber resources they chose to exploit In South America joint roadmaps have been developed with various stakeholders in terms of responding to the FLEGT and broader forest governance agendas with an overall objective to create an enabling environment and increase capacity in South America for developing initiatives that reduce illegal logging and bring timber trade in line with EU FLEGT objective with a particular focus on trade to the European Union from Brazil Colombia Ecuador and Peru Discussions have been held with private sector representatives in each of the four countries to introduce the FLEGT Action Plan including issues relating to the EU Timber Regulation EUTR and VPAs FLEGT website TRAFFIC and partners have engaged organizations that represent a broad range of indigenous groups in the respective countries or within the region One such organization is the Coordinator of Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon River Basin COICA which represents nine national indigenous organisations In Colombia the project has built on the long term association between WWF Colombia and the Uraba Environmental Region Corporation CORPOURABA which represents the Corpouraba the Chigorodo and Mutata Indigenous Councils National scoping studies for Colombia Peru Ecuador and Brazil have been published presenting an analysis of illegal logging and timber trade and the state of forest governance and management Participants in a multi stakeholder experts meeting to explore between the FLEGT Action Plan and implementation of related forestry based initiatives agreed to produce recommendations to promote joint efforts in the various initiatives implementation An analysis of synergies between the FLEGT Action Plan and other forest governance policies and initiatives was published in December 2013 There is growing agreement regarding the importance of having robust measures of forest governance Initial indicator methodologies for Brazil Colombia Ecuador and Peru have been developed and an initial test measurement undertaken to establish a forest governance benchmark for Colombia Peru Ecuador and Brazil Many stakeholders within Brazil Colombia Ecuador and Peru particularly indigenous and other forest dwelling communities are largely unfamiliar with the aims and requirements of the EU FLEGT Action Plan and how this can contribute to improved forest governance To overcome this knowledge gap and to inform and encourage local stakeholder groups to use FLEGT and related measures to greater advantage in reducing illegal logging and trade and achieving wider forest governance objectives an online e learning tool has been developed in consultation with indigenous community representatives Training of indigenous community leaders has already been undertaken in Colombia Ecuador and Peru A final version of the e learning tool is available at http traffic cursogobernanzaforestal com and can also be accessed through the project website http flegt

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  • TRAFFIC - Wild Meat
    Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Our work Wild animals for food and medicine Wild pig being taken by bicycle to market Tanzania Simon Milledge TRAFFIC Meat of wild mammals reptiles amphibians and birds forms an important component of human diets and as medicinal ingredients around the world In some usually rural areas wild meat popularly termed bushmeat is the only accessible and or affordable form of animal protein available In others including much of the world s urban settlements bushmeat is eaten preferentially for its taste or for the very fact of its wildness Wild animals are also used as a source of medicines particularly within Asia and Africa In Asia a variety of body parts are included in traditional medicine pharmacopoeia In fact there is often not a clear line between consumption for food or consumption for medicine with some species eaten for their tonic properties An increasing number of vertebrate species are being hunted to dangerously low levels as a result of increased commercial demand for meat and medicines with many now in danger of extinction TRAFFIC strives to reverse current declines in wild species populations and consequent risks to local food security resulting from over exploitation for meat and medicines by helping ensure that empty stomachs do not lead to empty forests Africa TRAFFIC s Central Africa programme based in Cameroon operates a bushmeat programme that endeavours to monitor the trade in the region In September 2009 TRAFFIC help convene a workshop in the Democratic Republic of Congo where government agencies and others drew up a National Action Plan to address the unsustainable bushmeat trade which is driving animals such as Gorillas Bonobos and other large bodied mammals to extinction in the region TRAFFIC s work is promoting the development and uptake of such strategies at the national transboundary and regional level incorporating tools to support better trade monitoring encouraging greater enforcement efforts to address trade in threatened and protected species and considering alternative methods to meet human needs currently being met through unsustainable hunting see Biodiversity for Food and Medicine leaflet PDF 1 7 MB In Tanzania TRAFFIC drew attention to the need to manage the supply of wild meat protein available in refugee camps so that local wildlife populations are not devastated but harvested sustainably and to ensure residents of such camps have sufficient protein to eat Similar work is underway in Zimbabwe Previously TRAFFIC had provided the first ever overview on trade in meat for food and medicine in Eastern and Southern Africa PDF 150 KB Asia Increasing affluence in major consumer markets particularly in China coupled with improvements in transport infrastructure is leading to spiralling demand for many wild animal species Pangolins are the most frequently encountered mammals seized from illegal traders in the region

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