archive-org.com » ORG » T » TRAFFIC.ORG

Total: 219

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - EU closes shark finning loophole
    others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Nov 23 2012 EU closes shark finning loophole MEPs voted for new measures for EU vessels to land sharks with fins still attached Markus Burgener TRAFFIC Brussels Belgium 23rd November 2012 Members of the European Parliament this week voted overwhelmingly in favour of making it a requirement for EU fishing vessels only to land sharks with their fins still attached Landing whole sharks effectively prevents the wasteful practice of de finning sharks at sea and dumping the less valuable bodies into the ocean The fins are mainly destined for markets in Asia especially Hong Kong where shark fin soup is considered a delicacy Currently European Union vessels catch 15 approximately one in seven sharks caught world wide making it the largest single catcher of sharks Indonesia with just over 13 is the largest individual shark catching nation Based on data from FAO Other countries including Costa Rica and Australia have previously introduced measures for sharks to be landed with fins attached Two of Europe s top shark catching nations Spain and Portugal had vigorously opposed introduction of requirement to land sharks with fins attached by EU vessels As experience elsewhere demonstrates the sky hasn t fallen in on national fishing industries because of the requirement to land sharks with their fins attached said Glenn Sant TRAFFIC s Fisheries Trade Programme Leader Sant points out that landing whole sharks means identification will be more straightforward enabling accurate data collection on the numbers of each species being caught with obvious benefits for management of shark populations Prohibiting at sea removal of shark fins will significantly increase compliance with shark fishing regulations it makes sense from enforcement fisheries management and conservation perspectives Landing whole sharks also has the effect of reducing the number of sharks that can be caught in a single fishing trip because fins alone take up a lot less cargo hold space than whole shark bodies In the lead up to the vote a number of non governmental

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2012/11/23/eu-closes-shark-finning-loophole.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Deepwater set gillnets banned in the South Pacific Ocean
    interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Nov 12 2009 Deepwater set gillnets banned in the South Pacific Ocean Click on map to see approximate area where deepwater gillnets have been banned on the high seas TRAFFIC en Français Auckland New Zealand 14 November 2009 A ban on the use of deepwater set gillnets was announced today at the close of a meeting to establish a regional fisheries management organization that will have legally binding control over fishing in the South Pacific Ocean Deepwater gillnets impact heavily on vulnerable species such as sharks many of them already in marked decline through overfishing An added danger is that of ghost fishing caused through lost or discarded fishing gear continuing to catch fish that are never landed Last week TRAFFIC wrote to the fledgling South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organization SPRFMO to express deep concern over a claim by Spain that two of its vessels which had been setting deepwater gillnets up to 2 km underwater in seas off Australia s Lord Howe Island and elsewhere did not present a serious impact on vulnerable marine ecosystems VMEs Earlier this week Australia revealed it had confiscated a huge 130 km long gillnet set 1 5 km deep in Antarctic waters in the south western Indian Ocean where the use of such nets is already banned and proposed a ban

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2009/11/12/deepwater-set-gillnets-banned-in-the-south-pacific-ocean.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - White smoke for Whitetip and other sharks at CITES
    Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Mar 14 2013 White smoke for Whitetip and other sharks at CITES Several shark species caught for their fins and meat will now be protected under CITES Elizabeth Hayes Bangkok Thailand 14th March 2013 Earlier decisions to adopt proposals to include shark species threatened by overharvesting for their fins and meat within CITES the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora were accepted today during the final plenary wrap up session of the conference Likewise the Manta Rays were also formally adopted into the CITES Appenices This is an historic day for marine conservation said Glenn Sant TRAFFIC s Marine Programme Leader Sharks populations in freefall have been thrown a lifeline today CITES has finally listened to the scientists The plenary is intended to rubber stamp decisions taken earlier during the meeting but does allow for debate to reopen usually when there have been close votes when earlier decisions were taken As widely predicted Japan called for a reopening of the debate on the Oceanic Whitetip the first of the shark species proposals to be considered However they narrowly failed to reach the necessary number of votes for the debate to reopen It followed a period of considerable confusion about whether proper rules had been followed to allow the debate to take place Following the failure by Japan to reopen the debate on Oceanic Whitetip a similar attempt was made to reopen the debates for the hammerhead shark species but this also failed There was no attempt to reopen the debate on the Porbeagle shark Management through CITES is vital for the responsible management trade and consumption of sharks believes TRAFFIC This is far too important an issue for politics to intervene we re talking about the very survival of some species and the protection of the livelihoods of shark fishers Global catches of sharks are in excess of 800 000 tonnes per year and the fin trade alone is worth more than USD480 million per year Meanwhile populations of some of the shark species

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2013/3/14/white-smoke-for-whitetip-and-other-sharks-at-cites.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Historic day as sharks and manta rays receive UN protection
    ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Sep 12 2014 Historic day as sharks and manta rays receive UN protection Oceanic whitetips awaiting sale at the Negombo fish market Sri Lanka WWF Canon Andy Cornish in Chinese 12th September 2014 On Sunday 14th September five species of sharks and two manta ray species will receive protection under the United Nation s Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES when formal measures to regulate their international trade come into effect The five sharks and two manta rays species include Scalloped Hammerhead Shark Sphyrna lewini Great Hammerhead Shark Sphyrna mokarran Smooth Hammerhead Shark Sphyrna zygaena Oceanic Whitetip Shark Carcharinus longimanus Porbeagle Shark Lamna nasus and manta rays Manta spp All the sharks except Porbeagle are caught for their fins which are exported to East Asia especially Hong Kong where they are the key ingredient in sharks fin soup an expensive but popular delicacy The Porbeagle Shark is mainly caught for consumption of its meat within the European Union while the gill plates of manta rays are highly valued as a health tonic in southern China All the species are commercially valuable and threatened through over harvesting Under the newly introduced CITES measures their commercial trade must be strictly regulated and the species can only be exported or taken from national and international waters when the exporting fishing country certifies they were legally sourced and that the overall level of exports does not threaten the survival of the species In March last year representatives from the 178 government Parties to CITES voted to include the shark and ray species within Appendix II of the Convention There are a number of technical issues associated with this listing such as enforcement agencies learning how to identify products in trade especially the fins that are usually traded in dried form and the Parties were given an 18 month period to prepare for the introduction of CITES requirements Many organizations including the CITES Secretariat the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization FAO plus non governmental organizations including TRAFFIC and WWF have therefore worked to improve capacity on managing shark fisheries to bring them in line with CITES rules before today s deadline Supported by the German government TRAFFIC developed guidelines for countries who will need to make informed decisions so called non detriment findings or NDFs about the levels of trade shark populations can sustain before CITES permits can be issued The NDF guidelines are being widely distributed to fisheries management authorities In parallel as part of a UK government supported project TRAFFIC has developed M risk a novel method to quantify the risk of over exploitation of shark stocks as a result of poor or inadequate management TRAFFIC is fully

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/9/12/historic-day-as-sharks-and-manta-rays-receive-un-protection.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - New study gets its teeth into shark trade regulations
    8 MB was commissioned by the European Commission and written in the wake of the shark and manta ray species being listed within the Appendices of CITES the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora at a meeting held in Bangkok Thailand in March this year They include the Oceanic Whitetip shark Porbeagle shark three species of hammerhead shark Scalloped Great and Smooth and manta rays all of them subject to continued over exploitation The species are all slow growing late to mature and produce few young making them highly susceptible to over fishing There was great elation when these sharks and manta rays were listed in CITES this March but although it was a significant moment for the conservation world now comes the task of making these listings work in practice as time is running out for some of these species said Glenn Sant TRAFFIC s Marine Programme Leader CITES listings do not take away the need for comprehensive fisheries management they represent one critical part of that management through aiming to control trade and prevent international trade in products of these species being sourced from unsustainable or illegal fisheries Mr Hugo Schally Head of Unit in the Directorate General for Environment of the European Commission said This report provides a comprehensive picture of the situation of the sharks and rays listed at the last CITES Conference of the Parties as well as of the challenges ahead to ensure that international trade in those species becomes sustainable It also shows that many countries and stakeholders are working together and planning joint activities to ensure proper implementation of the CITES shark and ray listings This information will prove very useful to the EU which granted 1 2 Million to the CITES secretariat to carry out a capacity building programme specifically targeted at countries involved in the harvest of and trade in CITES listed sharks and rays The new listings have been delayed coming into effect until 14th September 2014 to give CITES Parties adequate time to prepare for their implementation including guidance for range States on how to determine what levels of trade are sustainable for the species concerned a requirement under CITES for trade to be permitted The new study aimed to identify which of the 178 CITES Parties will mainly be affected by the listings the relevant existing international regional and domestic regulations the main challenges facing implementation of the measures and any additional capacity building needs to ensure those Parties catching and trading in the products of these species can validate their sustainability and legality before issuing permits The study revealed a lack of basic information on the levels of catch and population status of the newly listed marine species with an urgent need to improve the identification of species in trade reporting of their trade and for further research assessment and monitoring to determine the impacts of trade on populations The study also highlighted the need to ensure domestic regulatory frameworks

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2013/7/30/new-study-gets-its-teeth-into-shark-trade-regulations.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Shark fisheries management: TRAFFIC develops new risk assessment method
    Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Wednesday Apr 23 2014 Shark fisheries management TRAFFIC develops new risk assessment method TRAFFIC has developed M risk to assess the vulnerability of sharks to over exploitation Elizabeth Hayes Cambridge UK 23rd April 2014 TRAFFIC has developed M risk a novel method to quantify the risk posed by over exploitation of shark stocks as part of a project supported by the UK s Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs Defra The technique assesses the risk that adequate management measures are not in place to protect shark species adequately M Risk and is detailed in Development of a Rapid Management Risk Assessment Method for Fish Species through its Application to Sharks Framework and Results published earlier this month The study builds on earlier work by TRAFFIC examining the intrinsic vulnerability of different shark species to over exploitation 46 medium or high risk species were chosen for the latest study whose goal was to develop a blueprint for a transparent repeatable risk assessment framework suitable for application to a variety of marine species not only sharks The resulting M Risk assessment identifies the species stocks of sharks of potential concern and their relative level of concern This allows for prioritization of those species stocks where management measures are critical and also identifies those stocks where improvements to management measures are needed Out of 173 shark stocks identified for the 46 species concerned 150 87 were assessed as having a high M Risk and 23 as having a medium M Risk The large number of high M risk assessments is a reflection of the inadequacy of shark catch and bycatch data as well as a lack of shark stock management measures TRAFFIC s studies of the international shark trade should enable fisheries management authorities to determine which species are at high risk of over exploitation and what management measures need to be taken to lower that risk said Glenn Sant TRAFFIC s Marine Programme Leader In some instances protection

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/4/23/shark-fisheries-management-traffic-develops-new-risk-assessm.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - New Non-Detriment Finding guidelines available
    Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Apr 25 2014 New Non Detriment Finding guidelines available UPDATE In August 2014 the German Government through BfN convened a workshop of experts where the shark NDF guidelines were refined and revised The revised versions are now available in both English and Spanish through the CITES shark website portal Cambridge UK 25th April 2014 TRAFFIC has helped develop straightforward steps for determining whether trade in a particular species is likely to be detrimental to its survival a key requirement for countries before allowing export of their wildlife resources The new guidelines are aimed at helping government authorities decide whether a Non Detriment Finding NDF can be issued and export permits granted to allow trade to proceed for a species listed under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES Determining a robust NDF is one of the key challenges facing governments in implementing their obligations under CITES and some CITES Scientific Authorities have struggled to implement this rather complex process In recent years there has been a focus on developing guidance for different taxa Now thanks to funding provided by the German Government s BfN and WWF Germany TRAFFIC has developed new guidelines to assist CITES Scientific Authorities in determining NDFs for perennial plants and thanks to further BfN funding they have been used as a basis for developing NDF guidelines for sharks too Both the plant and shark NDF guidelines lead the reader through a simple step by step process to determine whether a recommendation for trade to proceed or not is appropriate The voluntary plant NDF guidelines PDF 2 MB associated guidance document PDF 2 MB and worksheets Doc 1 6 MB will be presented at a side event held during the CITES Plants Committee meeting next month in Mexico Their development included testing and refinement following a workshop held in Viet Nam and TRAFFIC also drew on their experience in developing the FairWild Standard for sustainable wild plant harvesting The guidelines should also support the implementation of the Convention for Biological Diversity CBD s Global Strategy for Plant Conservation GSPC The shark NDF guidelines PDF 2 MB also build upon work carried out by TRAFFIC on behalf of the European Commission

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/4/25/new-non-detriment-finding-guidelines-available.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Tiger, tiger: future not so bright
    whiskers and bones were on sale in 10 percent of the 326 retail outlets surveyed during 2006 in 28 cities and towns across Sumatra Outlets included goldsmiths souvenir and traditional Chinese medicine shops and shops selling antique and precious stones The survey conservatively estimates that 23 tigers were killed to supply the products seen based on the number of canine teeth on sale This is down from an estimate of 52 killed per year in 1999 2002 said Julia Ng Programme Officer with TRAFFIC Southeast Asia and lead author on The Tiger Trade Revisited in Sumatra Indonesia Sadly the decline in availability appears to be due to the dwindling number of tigers left in the wild All of TRAFFIC s surveys have indicated that Medan the capital of North Sumatra province and Pancur Batu a smaller town situated about 15 km away are the main hubs for the trade of tiger parts Despite TRAFFIC providing authorities with details of traders involved apart from awareness raising activities it is not clear whether any serious enforcement action has been taken Successive surveys continue to show that Sumatran Tigers are being sold body part by body part into extinction said Dr Susan Lieberman Director of WWF International s Species Programme This is an enforcement crisis If Indonesian authorities need enforcement help from the international community they should ask for it If not they should demonstrate they are taking enforcement seriously The report recommends that resources and effort should concentrate on effective enforcement to combat the trade by arresting dealers and suppliers Trade hotspots should be continually monitored and all intelligence be passed to the enforcement authorities for action Those found guilty of trading in tigers and other protected wildlife should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law Sumatran tigers are being sold body part by body part into extinction this is an enforcement crisis Dr Susan Lieberman Director of WWF International s Species Programme TRAFFIC investigators found the parts of an estimated 23 tigers for sale Julia Ng TRAFFIC Southeast Asia We have to deal with the trade Currently we are facing many other crucial problems which unfortunately are causing the decline of Sumatran Tiger populations explained Dr Tonny Soehartono Director for Biodiversity Conservation Ministry of Forestry of Republic of Indonesia We have been struggling with the issues of land use changes habitat fragmentation human tiger conflicts and poverty in Sumatra Land use changes and habitat fragmentation are driving the tiger closer to humans and thus creating human tiger conflicts As a recent show of commitment the President of the Republic of Indonesia launched the Conservation Strategy and Action Plan of Sumatran Tiger 2007 2017 during the 2007 Climate Change Convention in Bali Sumatra s remaining few tigers are also under threat from rampant deforestation by the pulp and paper and palm oil industries The combined threats of habitat loss and illegal trade unless tackled immediately will be the death knell for Indonesian tigers The Sumatran Tiger is already listed as

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/2/13/tiger-tiger-future-not-so-bright.html (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive



  •