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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Paper Tigers: U.S. regulations on captive Tigers flawed
    Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Jul 31 2008 Paper Tigers U S regulations on captive Tigers flawed Lax regulations in the U S mean authorities have no way of knowing how many captive Tigers there are who owns them or what happens to their body parts when they die Click photo to enlarge Sybille Klenzendorf Washington U S 31 July 2008 Huge gaps in U S regulations could make Tigers held in captivity a target for illegal trade wildlife trade monitoring network TRAFFIC and WWF found in the first ever comprehensive report into captive Tiger regulations across the United States According to the report Paper Tigers The role of the U S captive Tiger population in the trade in Tiger parts the U S government has no way of knowing how many Tigers there are in captivity within its borders where they are who owns them or what happens to their body parts when they die In many states there are no controls on individuals keeping Tigers as pets A registration scheme for all captive Tigers and a means to monitor disposal of dead animals are urgently needed says the report There are more than 5 000 Tigers estimated to be in captivity in the United States more than the total wild population in Asia of around 4 000 animals They include animals bred in zoos used for entertainment in carnivals or promotional exhibits housed at rescue facilities and Tigers that are privately owned The United States and other member governments of CITES the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna have previously agreed to a Resolution whereby all countries where Tigers are bred in captivity should ensure that adequate management practices and controls are in place to prevent Tiger parts and derivatives from entering illegal trade from or through such facilities The lack of a comprehensive management system for captive Tigers is clear evidence the U S has not fully implemented this Resolution CITES also agreed that countries should not breed Tigers on a commercial scale for trade in their body parts Whilst the report found no current evidence of

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/7/31/paper-tigers-us-regulations-on-captive-tigers-flawed.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Metal detectors uncover hidden traps
    Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Mar 19 2009 Metal detectors uncover hidden traps Bandhavgarh forest guards receive training in the use of metal detectors to locate snares set for Tigers Samir Sinha TRAFFIC India New Delhi India 19 March 2009 A TRAFFIC India programme in co operation with the National Tiger Conservation Authority NTCA is using a novel method to locate snares set to catch Tigers and other animals Metal snares are often used to catch Tigers and other big cats but they are almost impossible to find because they are cleverly camouflaged said Samir Sinha Director of TRAFFIC India However by using Deep Search Metal Detectors forest guards can now find even the most cleverly hidden traps he explained Deep Search Metal Detectors are ideal for remote field operations because they are robust simple to assemble and use and do not require complicated maintenance or handling The detectors can also be used during post mortem examinations to see if snared animals have bullet wounds This helps strengthen legal follow up and should lead to more

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2009/3/19/metal-detectors-uncover-hidden-traps.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Log on to keep the tiger roaring
    resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Jan 27 2011 Log on to keep the tiger roaring Supporters are being urged to keep wild Tigers roaring in China Click photo to enlarge Vivek R Sinha WWF Canon Beijing China 27th January 2011 As the Chinese Year of the Tiger draws to a close on 2nd February TRAFFIC and WWF China are urging those concerned over the plight of wild Tigers to register their support at www listentothetiger com and make a Tiger roar At the website visitors can hear natural sounds from around the Tiger s habitat including bird song animals calling wind rustling tree leaves and a water rippling along a brook And after every fiftieth visitor registers their support for wild Tigers a Tiger s roar will be played to complete the aural image With only a handful of wild Tigers left in China we want people to realize that without their continuing support the

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2011/1/27/log-on-to-keep-the-tiger-roaring.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Chinese medicine societies reject use of tiger bones ahead of CITES conference
    weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Mar 12 2010 Chinese medicine societies reject use of tiger bones ahead of CITES conference en Français The World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies has urged its members not to use parts from endangered wildlife TRAFFIC s Xu Hongfa speaking at the meeting TRAFFIC Click photo to enlarge Doha Qatar 12 March 2010 WWF and TRAFFIC International welcome a World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies WFCMS statement urging its members not to use tiger bone or any other parts from endangered wildlife The statement was made at a symposium on Friday in Beijing and notes that some of the claimed medicinal benefits of tiger bone have no basis The use of tiger bones was removed from the traditional Chinese medicine TCM pharmacopeia in 1993 when China first introduced a domestic ban on tiger trade Tiger conservation has become a political issue in the world Therefore it s necessary for the traditional Chinese medicine industry to support the conservation of endangered species including tigers said Huang Jianyin deputy secretary of WFCMS Illegal trade in Asian big cat products is a key issue at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES Conference of Parties meeting at Doha Qatar China is among the 175 countries that are signatories to this international treaty governing wildlife trade CITES governments should be encouraged by this statement and use the opportunity they have at this meeting to pass measures that if properly enforced can help put an end to tiger trade said Dr Colman O Criodain Wildlife trade analyst WWF International The statement also calls on all WFCMS members to promote tiger conservation and encourages them to abide by all relevant international and national regulations on wildlife trade The Societies public declaration is a clear signal that the traditional Chinese medicinal community is now backing efforts to secure a future for wild tigers said Professor Xu Hongfa head of TRAFFIC s programme in China As an international traditional Chinese academic organization the WFCMS stated that it had a duty to research the conservation of endangered species including tigers In the meantime We will ask our members not to use endangered wildlife in traditional Chinese medicine and reduce the misunderstanding and bias of the international community said the WFCMS Huang

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2010/3/12/chinese-medicine-societies-reject-use-of-tiger-bones-ahead-o.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Malaysia’s Tigers get a boost from the National Football Association
    inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Apr 23 2015 Malaysia s Tigers get a boost from the National Football Association Player escorts wearing MYCAT Tiger T Shirts next to the Malaysian football team ahead of kick off Football Association of Malaysia Kuala Lumpur Malaysia 23rd April 2015 Malaysia s Tigers have a new champion in the Football Association of Malaysia FAM that is partnering conservation organisations in their fight to save wild tigers The FAM has recognized the Malaysian Conservation Alliance for Tigers MYCAT as its social responsibility partner and will work with the group to raise awareness on the need to save Tigers and garner more support from Malaysians for Tiger conservation MYCAT of which TRAFFIC is a founding member brings together four conservation organisations Malaysian Nature Society MNS TRAFFIC Wildlife Conservation Society Malaysia Programme and WWF Malaysia that work with the government on implementing the country s National Tiger Conservation Action Plan for Malaysia With numbers averaging 300 individuals the Malayan Tiger qualifies as Critically Endangered under the IUCN Red List category MYCAT believes there is a need for an overhaul in the country s approach to tackling the Tiger s greatest threats poaching and illegal trade Every Malaysian needs to know about what is happening to Malaysia s forests and many other endangered animals like Tigers after all these are national heritage to be passed on to many more generations to come said Dr Kae Kawanishi MYCAT General Manager Just last month MYCAT released its 10 year anniversary report profiling over a decade of challenges and achievements in Tiger conservation in Malaysia The report reflects on past trends including the seizures of at least 100 Tigers over a decade with dire predictions for the Tiger s future unless urgent action is taken It also makes a plea for the establishment of a National Tiger Task Force led by the Prime Minister which can mobilise resources to implement the national plan of action for tigers Malaysian football fans show their support for wild Tigers MYCAT The new FAM partnership was announced at the Asian Football Confederation Under 23 Championship 2016 Group i Qualifiers which took place at the end of March and is an important show of support

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2015/4/23/malaysias-tigers-get-a-boost-from-the-national-football-asso.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Brush with the law: 60 enforcement officers benefit from training on illegal logging
    weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Mar 06 2014 Brush with the law 60 enforcement officers benefit from training on illegal logging A truck loaded with timber Cameroon Roland Melisch TRAFFIC Kribi south Cameroon March 2014 60 law enforcement officers from the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife MINFOF Ministry of Finance Customs and Forest Taxes Securing Programme Ministry of Defence Police and Gendarmerie and Ministry of Justice have received training on how to ensure good governance and transparency within the logging and timber industry in Cameroon The training for trainers workshops were part of a series of capacity building events carried out under a joint TRAFFIC MINFOF International Tropical Trade Organization ITTO project on Strengthening the national process for controlling illegal logging and associated trade in Cameroon TRAFFIC helped organize the final two workshops in the series which targeted finance customs and taxes officials and defence police gendarmerie and justice officials respectively The meetings focused on issues related to unsustainable logging weak forest law enforcement and illegal timber trade as well as providing information on forest law enforcement and how forestry logging in violation of

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/3/6/brush-with-the-law-60-enforcement-officers-benefit-from-trai.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Congo Basin: TRAFFIC features as CBFP Partner of the Month
    Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Wednesday Aug 13 2014 Congo Basin TRAFFIC features as CBFP Partner of the Month August 2014 This August TRAFFIC is featuring as Partner of the month within the Congo Basin Forest Partnership CBFP The Congo Basin Forest Partnership CBFP was created at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg South Africa to co ordinate efforts to sustain forest resources in the Congo Basin The CBFP has more than 75 partners including all the Central African countries governments and government agencies from other regions of the world international organizations NGOs scientific institutions and the private sector CBFP works in close collaboration with the Central African Forest Commission COMIFAC the body in charge of co ordinating regional forest and environmental policy and promoting the conservation and sustainable management of the Congo Basin s forest ecosystems The reduction of illegal trade in wildlife products especially ivory and of trade in illegally harvested tropical timber preventing unsustainable exploitation and improving transparency and governance in trade are key components for the sustainability of the Congo Basin s forest ecosystem These are important issues of concern to COMIFAC and CBFP who are strongly supported in their efforts to address them in the region by TRAFFIC TRAFFIC opened its regional office in Yaoundé Cameroon in 2008 and in the same year TRAFFIC was admitted as a partner of CBFP Since then TRAFFIC has conducted a range of activities in Central Africa which have yielded a number of achievements including Provision of technical support to the COMIFAC Secretariat in drafting adopting and implementing their Sub regional Action Plan for Strengthening National Wildlife Law Enforcement PAPECALF 2012 2017 in all the COMIFAC countries Supporting the inventory and verification of national ivory stock piles in Gabon and Central African Republic at the request of the respective governments Development of a regional framework for assessing legality of forest operations timber processing and trade in collaboration with the Global Forest and Trade Network GFTN Enhancement of the capacity of more than 2000 staff from forestry and wildlife law enforcement agencies Production of the first French manual on the implementation of the Elephant Trade Information System ETIS under CITES ETIS Manual ETIS programme on monitoring of the illegal trade in ivory and other products of the African elephant Loxodonta africana as a tool for protecting elephants Development and implementation of a Central African Bushmeat Monitoring System Central Monitoring System French acronym SYVBAC and support to the Democratic Republic of Congo to elaborate their National Bushmeat Strategy and Action Plan Production of a Training Kit on forest legislation and law enforcement Development of the Framework for Assessing Verifying

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/8/13/congo-basin-traffic-features-as-cbfp-partner-of-the-month.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Tanzania’s disappearing timber revenue
    Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday May 25 2007 Tanzania s disappearing timber revenue Village in southern Tanzania showing log piles and village chairman s house arrowed TRAFFIC Click to enlarge Dar es Salaam Tanzania 25 May 2007 Millions of dollars worth of timber revenue is being lost each year in Tanzania because of poor governance and rampant corruption in the forestry sector according to a hard hitting report by TRAFFIC launched today The report Forestry governance and national development Lessons learned from a logging boom in southern Tanzania documents alarming levels of corruption illegal logging and exports of forest products from Tanzania Annually timber royalty losses amounted to US 58 million during 2004 and 2005 Trade losses are also significant China imported ten times more timber from Tanzania than is documented by Tanzania s export records implying a 90 loss of revenue from this source Up to 96 of potential timber royalties were lost by central and district governments due to under collection entire District Council budgets could have been increased several times over It s a national tragedy said TRAFFIC s Executive Director Steven Broad Income from a sustainably managed timber industry should be assisting national development and alleviating poverty not ending up in criminals bank accounts We re now in the situation where the Tanzanian forestry sector is highly dependent upon donor funding despite having the clear potential to be self sufficient from timber revenues Uncontrolled timber harvesting in southern Tanzania grew rapidly from 2003 largely because of increasing overseas demand especially from China Driven by greed and profit some operators broke laws paid minimal wages and minimal prices for harvested logs just 1 of their export value Meanwhile Tanzanian hardwoods commanded high prices internationally compared to timber from West and Central Africa The unsustainable harvesting has led to environmental degradation and the loss of commercially viable hardwoods in many areas Who s cutting their forests down and where are the profits going Simon Milledge TRAFFIC Although community based forest management is widespread in Tanzania rural communities unfortunately just aren t demanding enough accountability Who s cutting their forests down and where are the profits going asks TRAFFIC s Simon Milledge an author of the report More than half of the 28 logging companies studied had close links to senior forest or government officials In some rural areas the involvement of village leaders in the timber trade has led to an unfair distribution of profits and at higher levels there are many examples of self dealing nepotism and cronyism A hard hitting report by TRAFFIC reveals how millions of dollars worth of timber revenue is being lost each year in

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2007/5/25/tanzanias-disappearing-timber-revenue.html (2016-02-18)
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