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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - NGO alliance to tackle illegal logging
    is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Apr 10 2008 NGO alliance to tackle illegal logging Nobel Laureate Professor Wangari Maathai is presented with TRAFFIC s Tanzanian logging report at the launch of the anti corruption Mama Misitu campaign Left Blandina Nyoni Permanent Secretary Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism Click photo to enlarge Mwanzo Millinga Dar es Salaam Tanzania 10 April 2008 Seventeen non governmental organisations today signed a milestone agreement to launch the Mama Misitu campaign aimed at tackling corruption and mismanagement in Tanzania s forestry sector Professor Wangari Maathai winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 for her contribution to sustainable development democracy and peace formally launched the campaign in Dar es Salaam Mama Misitu was initiated following the release of TRAFFIC s seminal report into the forestry sector in Tanzania last May which provided evidence that illegal logging and weak forest governance was costing Tanzania billions of shillings in lost revenue each year as well as threatening some of the nation s unique biodiversity Losses of up to USD58 million were estimated in 2005 alone the equivalent of building 1 933 primary schools and a culture of corruption has plagued the natural resources sector made worse by low awareness at many levels of the relevant legal and policy tools TRAFFIC is delighted to be part of the Mama Misitu campaign which we are confident will bring about concerted action from civil society and others leading to better transparency and governence in the forestry sector and a fairer sharing of the benefits that sustainable logging brings said Simon Milledge Deputy Director of TRAFFIC East and Southern Africa and a lead author of Forestry governance and national development Lessons learned from a logging boom in southern Tanzania It is heartening to see the forestry governance issues highlighted in the TRAFFIC report being acted upon he added The Mama Misitu campaign will work with people at all levels of society to ensure that forests are managed sustainably for the benefit of present and future generations Now is the time for action declared Cassian Sianga of the Tanzania Natural Resources Forum We have the information we know what needs to be done and through the Mama Misitu campaign we plan to make real changes in how Tanzania s forests are managed Business as usual is no longer acceptable It is robbing our nation of desperately needed resources Cassian Sianga Tanzania Natural Resources Forum TRAFFIC s logging report underpins the Mama

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/4/10/ngo-alliance-to-tackle-illegal-logging.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Deforestation spreading out from Dar es Salaam
    News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday Aug 09 2010 Deforestation spreading out from Dar es Salaam Deforestation radiates out in a predictable fashion from major demand centres finds a new study Click photo to enlarge Simon Milledge TRAFFIC 9 August 2010 A new study documents waves of forest degradation advancing 120 km from Dar Es Salaam over a 14 year period The study by an international team of scientists supports an economic model that predicted the sequential removal of products from high to low value radiating out from major demand centres The authors conclude that tropical forest degradation can be modeled and predicted an important finding in shaping policies such as the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation REDD negotiations taking place within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Researchers visited forests at varying distances up to 210 km from Tanzania s largest city Dar es Salaam in 1991 and again in 2005 tracking the trees that remained They found that waves of degradation moved each year out from the city For example charcoal extraction extended 50 km from Dar es Salaam in 1991 but in 2005 it was found up to 170 km from the city Similarly the areas where mid value timber was logged ranged from 50 170 km out in 1991 but had moved a further 110 km by 2005 and the high value timber logging area had moved out beyond 220 km at a rate of around 9 km per year This is despite most logging and charcoal production in Tanzania being illegal and the cause of major financial losses Forestry governance and national development Lessons learned from a logging boom in southern Tanzania a TRAFFIC study published in 2007 estimated that in 2005 some 96 percent of harvested timber was exported illegally losing the Tanzanian government an estimated USD58 million in revenue Government regulations do not currently prevent forest degradation but they can successfully prevent complete deforestation said Jumapili Chenga a TRAFFIC Programme Officer based in Tanzania Kisiju the only forest in the study area without any legal reserve status was the only one completely cleared by 2005 Urban migration and rising demand for timber particularly in China are amongst the major reasons for the rapid spread of degradation waves Such studies provide valuable information for bilateral dialogue between Tanzania and China as one of the

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2010/8/9/deforestation-spreading-out-from-dar-es-salaam.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Tanzania develops “timber trade checklist”
    view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Tuesday Sep 03 2013 Tanzania develops timber trade checklist Illegal logging operations cost the country dearly TRAFFIC en Français Dar es Salaam Tanzania September 2013 Representatives of the private timber trade sector in Tanzania together with enforcement agencies governmental and non governmental organizations met last week during a forum hosted by TRAFFIC to develop a timber trade checklist for Tanzania The checklist is aimed at improving interagency collaboration compliance and transparency in Tanzania s timber trade It will be made available in late September 2013 and will form the basis for training of relevant enforcement personnel to implement timber trade regulations The two day meeting included representatives from Kenwood Ent Tanzania LTD SHIVIMITA the Tanzania Forest Industries Association representing 1000 members in the timber business the Prevention and Combating of Corruption Bureau INTERPOL the Tanzania Revenue Authority Police Tanzania Forest Service National Task Force on Timber Trafficking TRAFFIC WWF Lawyers Environmental Action Team LEAT Mpingo Conservation Development Initiative Tanzania Natural Resource Forum and Mama Misitu Campaign who funded the event It was the first time all these agencies had sat down together to discuss the country s timber trade Participants examined in detail the entire timber trade chain within the country from source to export noting particularly the places where more attention was needed and where it would have greatest impact in ensuring the legality and sustainability of timber trade supplies while ensuring timber custodians received fair compensation for their natural resources The deliberations will now be used to create a checklist of the key intervention points along the trade chain and the actions needed at each The meeting organized by TRAFFIC in Dar es Salaam Tanzania was very useful in bringing key stakeholders to deliberate on the critical aspects of continued loss of public revenues due to some forest product traders not willing to comply to state laws and regulations said Dr Felician Kilahama Chairman Committee on Forestry COFO FAO who was a participant at the meeting Also inadequate sector capacity and corrupt practices make the situation worse The meeting on the 28 29th August 2013 is a good way forward to address issues of non compliance in forest products trade for the benefit of the country and her citizens and global communities The meeting was part of TRAFFIC s ongoing work on the timber trade in the region and Tanzania in particular Earlier in

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2013/9/3/tanzania-develops-timber-trade-checklist.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Angola, Namibia and Zambia vow to take action on illegal timber trade
    Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Aug 07 2015 Angola Namibia and Zambia vow to take action on illegal timber trade Directors of Forestry for Angola Namibia and Zambia l to r Mr Ignatius N Makumba Director of Forestry Zambia Mr Joseph Hailwa Director of Forestry Namibia Mr Domingos Nazaré da Cruz Veloso National Director of Forests Angola En français Windhoek Namibia 7th August 2015 the first ever collaborative workshop on forest management and timber trade between Namibia Angola and Zambia ended this week with agreement reached on developing a time bound Action Plan for collective forest management and timber trade Directors of Forestry and support staff from the three countries met during the workshop hosted by the Directorate of Forestry of Namibia and supported by IRDNC Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation and TRAFFIC under a SASSCAL timber project TRAFFIC welcomes the development of the forestry Action Plan to address the growing concern that timber species found in Namibia Angola and Zambia are subject to overharvesting and associated illegal and unregulated trade said TRAFFIC Senior Programme Officer Markus Burgener High value species including Pterocarpus angolensis Kiaat Baikaiea plurijuga Zambezi Teak and Guibourtia coleosperma Rosewood are used domestically for construction but the majority of wood extracted is exported from the region as sawn timber to supply markets in Asia and South Africa Due to the cross border nature of the trade it is critical for the three countries to collaborate in addressing the related challenges to ensure that trade in the species is legal and sustainable The meeting aimed to identify the key issues associated with forest management and timber trade and develop a collaborative Action Plan for addressing them Through a process of information sharing and open discussion the main challenges identified included inadequate communication between the countries lack of awareness of forestry regulations limited information and data sharing capacity resource shortfalls and legislation and policy gaps Having identified these issues the three countries collectively developed a time bound Action Plan which includes the development of a Memorandum of Understanding for collective forest management and timber trade Other key areas targeted by the Action Plan include harmonization of documentation greater sharing of information and data and cross border collaboration for increased compliance The Action Plan also addresses the need in all three countries for capacity building to tackle the overharvesting and illegal trade of timber effectively In order to monitor the implementation of the Action Plan an annual workshop has been requested by the Directors of the

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2015/8/7/angola-namibia-and-zambia-vow-to-take-action-on-illegal-timb.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Forest stakeholders meet to examine Madagascar timber
    Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Sep 26 2014 Forest stakeholders meet to examine Madagascar timber TRAFFIC s Cynthia Ratsimbazafy alongside Malagasy Government Representative Mr Alain Chan Ki Kiong during the workshop Antananarivo Madagascar 26th September 2014 This week all stakeholders involved in timber extraction and management met in Madagascar to discuss the country s timber trade resources and industry and in particular the process required to ensure that timber harvest is carried out legally and sustainably The five day workshop 22nd to 26th September 2014 under the Preserving Madagascar s Natural Resource Program aimed at Enhancing the capabilities of Malagasy people and civil society organizations to combat the illegal exploitation of Madagascar s natural resources was funded by USAID and convened by TRAFFIC and WWF The General Secretary of the Ministry of Environment Ecology and Forest in opening the meeting noted the requirement for Madagascar s forest to be for the benefit of the Malagasy people During the first part of the workshop delegates developed priority actions and identified partnerships required for Madagascar to complete the non detriment findings NDFs process for the country s precious woods notably rosewoods Dalbergia spp and ebony Diospyros spp Some urgent actions agreed in the workshops included identifying the timber species being harvested and determining population densities of commercially utilized rosewood and ebony With the objective of bringing transparency to Madagascar s timber trade the meeting also assessed the laws and policies applicable to the management of the forest resources and timber industry and in particular identifying the gaps and additional management measures required to place the country s timber trade on a sustainable footing The WWF GFTN and TRAFFIC s timber legality framework was used to guide this discussion According to article IV of the CITES convention before permits to export species listed in annex II of the CITES can take place and export permits issued a country s CITES Management Authority must determine whether the export will have a detrimental impact on the species in question that means having to make a NDF Bringing transparency and sustainability to Madagascar s timber

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/9/26/forest-stakeholders-meet-to-examine-madagascar-timber.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Local agreements sought to prevent forest loss in Ecuador
    Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Nov 21 2008 Local agreements sought to prevent forest loss in Ecuador TRAFFIC runs workshops on governance and transparency in the Amazon basin A representative of a local chainsaw and logger association shows his documentation for legal timber Click photo to enlarge TRAFFIC South America Quito Ecuador 21 November 2008 Local people living in and close to Amazonian forests in Ecuador have been consulted through a new TRAFFIC project to devise the best ways to manage their forests sustainably and prevent forest loss and degradation TRAFFIC and local partner Servicio Forestal Amazonico brought together local forestry stakeholders including loggers timber traders carpenters indigenous people forest authorities police municipalities non governmental organizations and others People living in or close to forests can have a strong interest to conserve and manage their natural resource sustainably but all too often their forests are being cleared or over exploited said Ulrich Malessa TRAFFIC South America s Regional Timber Programme Co ordinator TRAFFIC and our local partner Servicio Forestal Amazonico aimed to bring everyone with an interest in maintaining their forests together to develop ways to ensure their forests can be managed for the benefit of all Ecuador has one of the world s most rapid rates of deforestation estimated at 1 7 per year between 2000 and 2005 but up to 2 4 in one Amazonian Province The majority of forest loss is for clearance for agriculture but over exploitation of forests leads to unsustainable use of resources and ultimately loss of biodiversity One of the major outcomes from the recent meetings was a joint willingness for people to work together to stop illegal practices that degrade forests Some local communities decided to establish forestry management groups to discuss key issues related to forest governance and illegal logging whilst in another case the government forest administration and several associations of indigenous people including the Shuar agreed to co operate on such issues These local alliances can mitigate the failure of many national and international processes which do not function at the local level said Malessa Over the last 20 years there has

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/11/21/local-agreements-sought-to-prevent-forest-loss-in-ecuador.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Illegal logging issues faced head on in Jeju
    Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Wednesday Sep 19 2012 Illegal logging issues faced head on in Jeju Panellists Wale Adeleke Megan Dickie Gustavo Sanchez Ernesto Herrera Chen Hin Keong and standing Chip Barber September 2012 the timber trade and the growing demand for more transparent supply chains came under the spotlight at a workshop led by TRAFFIC and Reforestamos México at the IUCN World Conservation Congress last week The workshop on International and national legal frameworks for logging and timber trade In support of forest ecosystem resilience and legal prohibition of illegal timber in trade featured expert speakers on forestry and legality from America Meso America Africa and Asia and was moderated by Charles Chip Barber Forest Division Chief of the U S State Department Chen Hin Keong TRAFFIC s Global Forest Trade Programme Leader highlighted several international initiatives to develop tools for improving legality and transparency in the trade of forest products and also explained the three possible sources of change supply side changes behavioural changes of producers and demand side changes Some producer countries have revised their forest policies including strengthening forestry legislation increasing timber trade controls implementing log export bans using value added in country processing and engaging in capacity building and institutional strengthening Behavioural changes of producers and industry have included more prominence to certification for legality and sustainability codes of practice and independent auditing while demand based approaches have targeted the implementation of public purchasing policies for legal and sustainably sourced timber products by governments Some governments have taken further action by legislating against the trade in illegally harvested timber including the U S Lacey Act 2008 amendments the EU bilateral Voluntary Partnership Agreement VPA and the EU Timber Regulation Chen also shared the TRAFFIC GFTN developed Legality Verification Tool designed to help industry governments and civil society understand the legality requirements and be familiar with the documentation and permits required at all levels of the timber supply chain Ernesto Herrera Executive Director of Reforestamos México shared his organisation s efforts to ensure the legality of forestry and timber trade in Mexico using the TRAFFIC GFTN framework as a guide Gustavo Sanchez of the forest community network Red Mexicana de Organizaciones Campesinas Forestales Red MOCAF spoke about the challenges faced by local communities and indigenous peoples in Mexico to comply with the legislation in the forestry sector The complicated procedure to obtain approval of management plans has created disincentives

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2012/9/19/illegal-logging-issues-faced-head-on-in-jeju.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Peru: indigenous people take control of their forest resources
    Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday May 30 2013 Peru indigenous people take control of their forest resources Indigenous communities within the Peruvian Amazon are forming Forestry Oversight watchdogs to oversee the fair and sustainable exploitation of their natural resources TRAFFIC Lima Peru 29th May 2013 Two indigenous communities within the Peruvian Amazon have formed a Veeduría Forestal or Forestry Oversight in a bid to curb the pillage of their forests by outsiders to secure fair prices for their timber resources and to increase transparency in the management of incomes derived from it Forestry Oversight is a technical unit constituted by community members within their local community governance structure and also within the wider regional organizational structures to improve leadership performance and understanding of forest conservation issues The newly created Forestry Oversight will oversee the operation of two existing organizations within two local communities Federación de Comunidades Nativas Ashéninka de la Provincia de Atalaya The Federation of Native Communities in the Province of Ashéninka FECONAPA in Ucayali Province and Federación Nativa del río Madre de Dios y Afluentes Federation of Ingensous Peoples of Madre de Dios River and its Tributaries FENAMAD in Madre de Dios Province The creation of the Forestry Oversight watchdog is a vital step for these local communities providing them with the opportunity to curb illegal logging and create an avenue for promoting transparency and fair business dealings for their forest produce said Braulio Buendia TRAFFIC s forestry expert and part of the team implementing a Living Amazon project The existence of such oversight bodies also facilitates the administration and management of the forest A clear overview of forestry operations results in improved income for local communities thanks to fair prices being secured for timber resources This is partly in response to better awareness of legal and administrative frameworks by community members as well as better implementation of the technical elements of forestry management and timber trade The carefully monitored incomes derived through Forestry Oversight will be invested in communal needs to improve health communications and education In turn this will boost the communities pride and confidence in sustainable management of their natural assets as the economic basis for their self defined development standards and aspirations without losing communities cultural values One of the main economic activities in the Amazon is the extraction and marketing of forest goods such as timber and wildlife However it is estimated that more than 80 of the wildlife traded and timber harvested in Peru is of illegal origin Consequently extraction of these resources is developed without considering the minimum standards of environmental sustainability required by law and often at a disadvantage for local communities Indeed illegal trade creates a major obstacle to the development of the peoples living in the Amazon and to sustainable management of

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2013/5/30/peru-indigenous-people-take-control-of-their-forest-resource.html (2016-02-18)
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