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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Sustainability at heart of agarwood talks
    fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Wednesday Oct 12 2011 Sustainability at heart of agarwood talks A meeting earlier this week in Kuwait sought to improve the implementation of regulations to ensure the legality and sustainability of the trade in agarwood the highly prized fragrant resin from Asia is integral to the culture of the Middle East Click image to enlarge Environment Public Authority of Kuwait in Japanese Kuwait October 2011 68 participants from 18 key producer and consumer countries of agarwood met last week in Kuwait to discuss the future of the ancient trade in this highly prized commodity Agarwood is the common name for the dark aromatic deposits of resin produced in the heartwood of Aquilaria and some species of Gyrinops trees large evergreens native to several countries from north east India eastwards through south east Asia and southern China in response to wounding or penetration of the tree and infection by a mould Agarwood has been used for centuries as highly prized perfume incense and traditional medicine across Asia and the Middle East The valuable product is known by a variety of names including Gaharu in Malaysia and Indonesia Oudh in the Middle East and as eaglewood and aloeswood Whole trees are normally felled to find the valuable resin deposits but with just 10 of trees naturally infected this is a very inefficient process Recently published TRAFFIC research has demonstrated how rising demand for agarwood problems in monitoring harvests and a persistent illegal trade threaten the future of the highly prized fragrant wood The workshop was a timely response to a looming agarwood crisis which could lead to rising illegal and unsustainable harvesting of Aquilaria trees in Asia and threaten the supplies of this commodity which is integral to the culture of the Middle East said Noorainie Awang Anak Senior Programme Officer with TRAFFIC Southeast Asia who attended the meeting in Kuwait Legal international trade in agarwood is regulated through a system of permits by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES but illegal and or unsustainable trade is placing a burden on continuing supplies of agarwood The meeting in Kuwait aimed to improve the implementation of CITES regulations to ensure the legality and sustainability of the agarwood trade Hundreds of tonnes of agarwood are traded each year involving at least 18 countries but over exploitation of old growth trees has led to a reduction in the quality and quantity of agarwood available Growth in the population and affluence of consuming markets in Japan Taiwan Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates UAE has seen

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2011/10/12/sustainability-at-heart-of-agarwood-talks.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - How to separate the wood from the ramin trees
    What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday Nov 05 2007 How to separate the wood from the ramin trees Skill is needed to identify ramin wood correctly hence the need for a specialist workshop TRAFFIC nbsp nbsp Singapore 5 November 2007 Nearly 30 Customs officials and representatives of CITES Management Authorities and forestry agencies from Singapore Malaysia Indonesia and China received training in identification of ramin wood at a workshop held in Singapore in November 2007 Ramin Gonystylus a genus of about 30 species of hardwood trees native to southeast Asia is listed in Appendix II of CITES the Convention in International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora meaning that international trade is allowed under certain conditions Enforcement and customs officers had earlier identified a lack of timber identification skills as a key issue hampering enforcement of CITES and other timber related laws in the region To address this need the US Forest Service USFS convened a workshop where specialists from the US Department of Agriculture USDA Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory FPL and the Malaysian Timber Industry Board MTIB taught enforcement officers how to identify ramin from other confusing and look a like

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2007/11/5/how-to-separate-the-wood-from-the-ramin-trees.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - EU Wildlife Trade
    Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Background European Union EU Wildlife Trade Initiative In 1980 when TRAFFIC established its first European national office much wildlife trade in Europe was unregulated many countries were not Parties to CITES and even when wildlife trade laws did exist they were often not well enforced TRAFFIC s work with the EU has therefore assisted governments and enforcement agencies in improving wildlife trade regulations and law enforcement activities EU and wildlife trade The 27 Member States of the European Union EU form one of the three largest wildlife consumer markets in the world alongside the USA and Japan Millions of live animals and plants are imported every year including parrots from South America caviar from the Caspian Sea reptiles from Africa and orchids from Southeast Asia A huge variety of wildlife products including shoes or bags made of reptile skin timber products such as furniture and dried plants used in medicines are in high demand by EU consumers This trade is regulated globally by CITES the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora which is implemented in the EU through the European Community EC Wildlife Trade Regulations and national laws Well regulated and legal trade can bring benefits to local people local economies and conservation For example the EU imports 95 of exported Vicuña wool providing significant income for 700 000 people in impoverished Andean communities in Bolivia Peru Argentina and Chile Sustainable development of the Vicuña wool trade has been supported by Italy Germany and the EC Volume and value TRAFFIC estimated the legal trade of wildlife products into the EU alone was worth an estimated 93 billion in 2005 and this increased to nearly 100 billion in 2009 TRAFFIC estimates that from 2000 2005 3 4 million lizard 2 9 million crocodile and 3 4 million snake skins all species listed under CITES were imported into the EU along with 300 000 live snakes for the pet trade plus 424 tonnes of sturgeon caviar more than half of all global imports and in 2004 alone more than

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/eu-wildlife-trade (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Traders review Brazil-Belgium timber trade
    newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Tuesday Dec 02 2014 Traders review Brazil Belgium timber trade A recent timber trade workshop highlighted the challenges faced by EU operators in mitigating the risk of importing illegal timber from Latin America TRAFFIC Ghent Belgium December 2014 A workshop on the European Union EU Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade FLEGT Action Plan was held at the end of November specifically for members of the Belgian Timber Importers Federation BE TIF Representatives from TRAFFIC BE TIF Belgium s Competent Authority for the EU Timber Regulation and NEPCon an EUTR Monitoring Organization as well as regional experts from Latin America engaged with workshop delegates through presentations and by reviewing a case study from Brazil on the EU Timber Regulation EUTR The workshop aimed to build the capacity of participants to identify the scope and type of information required provide guidance on issues to consider and highlight the tools and support available to undertake a credible and robust risk assessment when trading timber into the EU Specific focus was made in relation to legal illegal timber harvesting and trade from the main timber producing

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2014/12/2/traders-review-brazil-belgium-timber-trade.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Publications: Forestry
    8 MB by V Taylor K Kecse Nagy and T Osborn TRAFFIC 2013 TRAFFIC was requested by the European Commission EC to prepare this report to facilitate a greater understanding of the international trade in D nigra with particular reference to the EU and to provide a preliminary assessment of whether EU trade in D nigra was an issue warranting further attention Trading timbers A comparison of import requirements under CITES FLEGT and related EU legislation for timber species in trade PDF 300 KB Rosie Cooney Stephanie von Meibom and Chen Hin Keong TRAFFIC 2012 This document analyses and compares the requirements of the FLEGT Action Plan EU Timber Regulation and CITES for timber imported into the EU with a focus on the requirements of each for ensuring that timber is legally sourced Precious Woods background paper 1 Precious Woods TRAFFIC PDF 765KB April 2012 Anna Jenkins Neil Bridgland Rachel Hembry Ulrich Malessa James Hewitt Chen Hin Keong Catálogo de productos maderables y empresas certificadas en el Ecudor un apoyo para las compras públicas responsables PDF 1 86MB TRAFFIC and Forestry Stewardship Council 2012 Wood for the Trees A Review of the Agarwood Trade in Malaysia PDF 1 2 MB Lim Teck Wyn Nooranie Awang Anak 2010 TRAFFIC The Trade and Use of Agarwood Oudh in the United Arab Emirates PDF 710 KB Marina Antonopoulou James Compton Lisa S Perry Razan Al Mubarak 2010 TRAFFIC Global forest trade network common framework for assessing legality of forestry operations timber processing and trade PDF 570 KB 2009 TRAFFIC WWF National legality frameworks are also available for Central African Republic China Democratic Republic of Congo Gabon Malaysia Republic of Congo Viet Nam Cameroon and Indonesia with more to follow Prise en compte de la faune sauvage dans les concessions forestieres d Afrique Centrale Rapport de l atelier de Libreville 8 10 juin 2010 PDF 1 MB 2010 Nathalie Van Vliet Stéphane Ringuet Germain Ngandjui Eva Mouzong TRAFFIC Afrique Centrale Yaoundé Cameroun Review of trade in Merbau from major range States 900 KB PS Tong HK Chen J Hewitt and A Affre A March 2009 128pp ISBN 9789833393176 A report aimed to investigate in detail the international trade in merbau timber and to provide scientific and current data on the population status harvest management and trade in these species Trade and conservation of Taxus in China 2 3 MB TRAFFIC East Asia August 2007 90pp in Chinese Trade Measures Tools to Promote the Sustainable Use of NWFP An Assessment of Trade Related Instruments influencing the international trade in non wood forest products and associated management and livlihood strategies PDF 862KB 2007 Markus Burgener Sven Walter Forestry Governance and National Development Lessons Learned from a Logging Boom in Southern Tanzania An Overview 1 6 MB in Chinese 2 9 MB Simon H Milledge Ised K Gelvas Antje Ahrends February 2007 16pp ISBN 0 9802542 1 3 ISBN 978 0 9802542 1 1 Forestry Governance and National Development Lessons Learned from a Logging Boom in Southern

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/forestry/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Wild meat workshop held in Kinshasa
    Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Oct 08 2009 Wild meat workshop held in Kinshasa en Français Officials during the opening ceremony Left to right MM Dieudonné Mbayo UICN Albert Likunde General Secretary of MECNT Petrus Ndongala Viengele MECNT Idi OMari ADGA ICCN Stéphane Ringuet TRAFFIC Click photo to enlarge Eva Paule Mouzong TRAFFIC Kinshasa 8 October 2009 Some 50 participants from across the Democratic Republic of Congo DRC met in Kinshasa this September to formulate a national action plan to address the issue of trade in wild meat popularly termed bushmeat The workshop organized by ICCN the Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature under the patronage of the Ministry of Environment Nature Conservation and Tourism in collaboration with TRAFFIC Central Africa brought together participants from national authorities civil society representatives other elected bodies and print and broadcast media They met to brainstorm how to identify the factors underlying the unsustainable management of wildlife in the DRC to formulate a plan to address these issues and enable sustainable management of wildlife resources and to develop a plan of action with defined objectives expected outcomes actions to perform indicators sources of verification and funding Stéphane Ringuet Technical Advisor to TRAFFIC s Central Africa Programme noted that TRAFFIC s role in the workshop was to support the development of a strategy and National Action Plan on bushmeat and commented This strategy will help guide and focus the future efforts of the Democratic Republic of Congo to establish a framework for action throughout the country Dr Petrus Ndongala Viengele representing the Ministry of Environment Nature Conservation and Tourism welcomed the support of development partners and stressed that the strategy would allow the DRC to conserve its present wildlife resources and give nature the time for them to regenerate Personally I am worried about the future of our natural ecosystems the cry of alarm inherent in the term empty forest syndrome unfortunately became a reality for the forests of the DRC It would be a disaster for our country home to endemic species including the Bonobo and the Northern White Rhino to lose such animals This workshop to develop a nation management strategy for bushmeat is therefore vital Mr Idi Omari India representing the ICCN underlined that his organisation is looking forward to see the end of the current process launched during this workshop

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2009/10/8/wild-meat-workshop-held-in-kinshasa.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - New treaty to boost protection of gorillas—TRAFFIC, WWF
    RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Oct 26 2007 New treaty to boost protection of gorillas TRAFFIC WWF A new legally binding agreement will boost protection for wild gorillas WWF Canon Roger HOOPER Click to enlarge nbsp nbsp Gland Switzerland 26 October 2007 The new agreement endorsed today in Paris France by nine African countries to better protect gorillas is a major conservation achievement said WWF the conservation organization and TRAFFIC the wildlife trade monitoring network This is the first time that countries where great ape species are found in the wild are to be legally obligated to act in a coordinated manner against threats to these animals The agreement which will function like a mini convention or treaty specifies efforts that governments need to undertake and to collaborate on These include combating poaching supporting law enforcement and building capacity in the legal and judicial areas The agreement will be legally binding unlike previous declarations from the range countries such as the GrASP Kinshasa declaration in 2005 This is exciting news said Dr Susan Lieberman Director of WWF s Global Species Programme This new agreement is a powerful tool because it has the potential to reshape the way gorilla conservation is conducted It will promote collaboration and political will to secure habitat and stop escalating threats such as poaching and Ebola outbreaks all threats to the future of the world s gorillas Central African Republic Uganda Democratic Republic of Congo Republic of Congo Nigeria Equatorial Guinea Angola Cameroon and Gabon participated in the talks while Rwanda was unable to attend WWF and TRAFFIC who are active in gorilla conservation in most of the range countries were heavily engaged in the negotiation process and final text We pledge our support to work with governments to help make this agreement a reality for the benefit of gorillas their habitats and local communities added Dr Lieberman TRAFFIC warmly welcomes the new agreement which marks a major conservation achievement Roland Melisch TRAFFIC s Global Programme Co ordinator TRAFFIC warmly welcomes the new agreement which marks a major conservation achievement said Roland Melisch TRAFFIC s Global Programme Co ordinator The priority now is to make sure that the agreement s recommendations can be turned into conservation action as soon as possible Only then will we see an upturn in the fortunes of these magnificent animals For further information Joanna Benn WWF Global Species

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2007/10/26/new-treaty-to-boost-protection-of-gorillastraffic-wwf.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - French Government supports bushmeat monitoring in Central Africa
    l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Sep 18 2009 French Government supports bushmeat monitoring in Central Africa Blue duiker Cephalophus monticola one of the species most commonly found in bushmeat trade in Central Africa Click photo to enlarge Roland Melisch TRAFFIC Paris France 18 September 2009 TRAFFIC s monitoring of the bushmeat trade in Central Africa is to receive funding as part of a larger agreement signed today between the Government of France and IUCN to support sustainable management of biodiversity The agreement worth almost EUR8 million over four years will support a variety of biodiversity conservation projects established in 2009 in Africa the Mediterranean and in some of the European Union s overseas territories The French Government s support comes at a most critical time allowing TRAFFIC to continue its support to Central African countries in their commitments to achieve bushmeat related conservation and management goals of the Convergence Plan as laid out by the ten Member States of the Commission for the Forests of Central Africa COMIFAC said Steven Broad Executive Director of TRAFFIC Other projects to receive government support include the strengthening of the management of protected areas in West and Central Africa the identification of the most important parts of the Mediterranean in terms of biodiversity conservation and the improved protection of wildlife in Central Africa France s continued commitment to helping IUCN guarantee the sustainable use of the resources provided by different ecosystems particularly in countries that depend on them the most shows that nature conservation can and should be an integral part of developed countries policies said Julia Marton Lefèvre Director General of IUCN According to Jean Michel Severino Director General of the French Development Agency poor countries whose economic capital relies to a great extent on the environment are the first victims of the erosion of their natural capital Biodiversity conservation and the fight against poverty are inseparable and require as we have been doing for several years now with IUCN actions to be carried out

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2009/9/18/french-government-supports-bushmeat-monitoring-in-central-af.html (2016-02-18)
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