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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Lack of meat for refugees causing large scale poaching
    enlarge en Français Cambridge UK Gland Switzerland The lack of meat in refugee rations in East Africa is causing a flourishing illegal trade in wild meat threatening wildlife populations and creating a food security issue for rural communities reveals a new report by TRAFFIC the wildlife trade monitoring network The report Night Time Spinach Conservation and livelihood implications of wild meat use in refugee situations in north western Tanzania uses case studies from Kagera and Kigoma in Tanzania host to one of the largest concentrations of refugees in the world and the largest in Africa Illegally obtained wild meat is covertly traded and cooked after dark and referred to as night time spinach inside many refugee camps The scale of wild meat consumption in East African refugee camps has helped conceal the failure of the international community to meet basic refugee needs says Dr George Jambiya the main author of the report Relief agencies are turning a blind eye to the real cause of the poaching and illegal trade a lack of meat protein in refugees rations he added Sheer numbers of refugees often leads to extensive habitat degradation and dramatic loss of wildlife in affected areas with rare species like chimpanzees threatened by the demand for meat Populations of buffalo sable antelope and other grazing animals have also shown steep declines Since Tanzanian independence in 1961 more than 20 major refugee camps have been located close to game reserves national parks or other protected areas 13 of them still remained in 2005 In the mid 1990s an estimated 7 5 tons of illegal wild meat was consumed weekly in the two main refugee camps TRAFFIC says that refugees are doubly penalized their rights to minimum humanitarian care are not always being met and their own attempts to meet them are criminalized In contrast humanitarian assistance to displaced populations in Croatia Slovenia and Serbia during the early 1990s included the provision of corned beef Something has to be wrong if refugees who have run from guns in their home country then find themselves fleeing wildlife rangers firearms in their search for food says Simon Milledge of TRAFFIC and an author of the report Trade in wild meat is less expensive than local beef and culturally more desirable for many refugees also offering refugees the chance to generate income That s despite official Tanzanian refugee policy discouraging self reliance within the camps Conservation organizations believe the key is to supply meat from legal and sustainable wild meat supplies as well as rigorous law enforcement on the ground The sad reality is that those who most depend upon wild sources of food are usually the ones who pay the heaviest price for biodiversity loss says Dr Susan Lieberman Director WWF s International Species Programme WWF calls upon humanitarian agencies to provide for basic food security of refugees including animal protein to ensure a sustainable future for all The IUCN s Red List of Threatened Species shows that many of Sub Saharan Africa

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/1/22/lack-of-meat-for-refugees-causing-large-scale-poaching.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Final call for pangolins
    of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday Jun 30 2008 Final call for pangolins It is now or never for pangolins the poaching simply has to stop Click photo to enlarge TRAFFIC Singapore 30 June 2008 The perilous situation facing pangolin populations in Asia comes under the spotlight this week during a meeting jointly organized by Wildlife Reserves Singapore WRS and TRAFFIC Southeast Asia Pangolins or scaly anteaters are caught for consumption of their meat and for their scales which are used in traditional medicines However excessive poaching means numbers in the wild are dwindling rapidly Pangolins are the most numerous mammals found in confiscated illegal wildlife cargoes throughout Southeast Asia despite a complete ban on their trade They are regularly seized in Malaysia Thailand and Viet Nam the majority of shipments destined for China The commonest pangolin species in trade is believed to be the Malayan Pangolin Manis javanica sourced from Malaysia and Indonesia as populations elsewhere in their natural range have been decimated This week delegates from government agencies responsible for wildlife trade management non governmental organizations and scientists will discuss issues and challenges of pangolin trade enforcement in Asia their conservation ecology and biology as well as husbandry and management in zoological institutions This meeting is vital for the future survival of pangolins said Azrina Abdullah Director of TRAFFIC Southeast Asia It is now or never for pangolins the poaching simply has to stop Azrina Abdullah Director of TRAFFIC Southeast Asia In 2000 a complete ban on international pangolin trade was adopted by Parties to CITES the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora Despite the trade ban and tough penalties for those caught smuggling poaching continues unabated In China two pangolin smugglers received suspended death sentences in November 2007 and were fined a total of RMB3 million USD400 000 whilst their accomplices received jail sentences ranging between 10 years and life In February and March this year a staggering 23 tonnes of pangolin carcasses and scales the remains of approximately 8 000 animals were seized in Hai Phong Viet Nam in a single week Earlier this month an Indonesian fisherman was sentenced to 32 months in jail by a Malaysian court after pleading guilty to illegally possessing almost 200 kg of pangolin scales plus other wildlife parts Workshop participants from China Taiwan Malaysia the Philippines Viet Nam Cambodia Indonesia Brunei Lao PDR and Singapore will examine how to combat the illegal trade in pangolins and address the detrimental impact on wild populations and will develop an

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/6/30/final-call-for-pangolins.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Pangolins saved from slaughter
    Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Aug 28 2009 Pangolins saved from slaughter Some of the 98 rescued pangolins Click photo to enlarge TRAFFIC en Français Kuala Lumpur Malaysia 28 August 2009 In its biggest seizures of pangolins this year Malaysia s Wildlife and National Parks Department confiscated 98 animals from a house in Alor Setar in the northern state of Kedah The department s Wildlife Crime Unit raided the house at 6 30 am on Wednesday after about three weeks of surveillance and investigations The unit found the totally protected animals hidden in a store room behind the house and have arrested a man in his 40s in connection with the crime He has been released on a MYR5 000 USD1 400 bail The seizure included 58 adult male pangolins 38 adult females two juveniles and 3 2 kilogrammes of pangolin scales The pangolins were later released into a protected area A video of one of the rescued camera shy pangolins The man arrested in connection with the case faces five separate charges under the Protection of Wildlife Act 1972 including a charge of cruelty to wildlife said Saharudin Anan who heads the Department s law and enforcement division If found guilty on all counts he could face a maximum of 23 years in prison up to RM27 000 in fines or

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2009/8/28/pangolins-saved-from-slaughter.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Box turtles knocked out by excessive trade
    crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday Feb 23 2009 Box turtles knocked out by excessive trade Being driven to extinction in Indonesia by unregulated trade the Southeast Asia Box Turtle Click photo to enlarge Chris R Shepherd TRAFFIC Kuala Lumpur Malaysia 23 February 2009 Unregulated trade at 10 to 100 times legal levels has caused Southeast Asian Box Turtles almost to vanish from parts of Indonesia where once they were common according to a new report by TRAFFIC the wildlife trade monitoring network The turtles are used for meat and in Traditional Chinese Medicine with major markets in Hong Kong China Singapore and Malaysia mostly supplied from Indonesia Animals are also exported as pets mainly to the US Europe and Japan The study found at least 18 traders operating in Java Sulawesi Sumatra and Kalimantan dealing illegally in Southeast Asian Box Turtles Each trader handled an average of just under 2 230 turtles a week adding up to a combined total of 2 1 million Southeast Asian Box Turtles per year The vast majority is destined for export although Indonesia s official annual export quota for this species is just 18 000 turtles a figure set without a scientific basis The number of Southeast Asian Box Turtles currently traded is certainly ten times the official export quota and probably nearer 100 times it said Dr Sabine Schoppe author of the new report Status trade dynamics and management of the Southeast Asian Box Turtle in Indonesia PDF 2 4 MB Thirteen of the 18 traders investigated were registered for some trade in reptiles but not in box turtles with the provincial offices of the Government s Directorate General of Forest Protection and Nature Conservation PHKA which is required to inspect such businesses regularly TRAFFIC has previously presented the results of the study to PHKA Collectors in Riau and Sulawesi reported huge falls in Southeast Asian Box Turtle numbers in the wild and registered pet traders said they had experienced difficulties in obtaining turtles compared to a decade ago The current level of illegal exploitation will result in Southeast Asian Box Turtles being systematically wiped out across Indonesia indications of which are already obvious at collection and trade centres said Schoppe Juvenile Southeast Asian Box Turtles and Black Marsh Turtles South Kalimantan Click photo to enlarge Sabine Schoppe TRAFFIC In 2000 the Southeast Asian Box Turtle was listed in Appendix II of CITES the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora a measure intended to regulate its international trade However the report found that following CITES listing trade in the box turtles

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2009/2/23/box-turtles-knocked-out-by-excessive-trade.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Women hold key to solving wildlife trade issues in Amazon
    in Amazon A Huaorani woman preparing wild meat Click photo to enlarge Nicolás Kingman IUCN TRAFFIC Quito Ecuador 22nd February 2011 TRAFFIC is applying new approaches to reducing illegal and commercial hunting in Yasuní Biosphere Reserve in Amazonian Ecuador Instead of a traditional approach targeting male hunters TRAFFIC and project partners are instead working through existing womens groups in indigenous communities such as the Huaorani to reduce the illicit trade in wild meat that is threatening many of the region s wildlife species The Yasuní Biophere Reserve YBR in Ecuador is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth The Yasuní National Park which lies at the core of the reserve is one of Ecuador s largest protected areas approximately 982 000 ha It contains the Napo Tropical Moist Forest and is the headwaters of many rivers of the upper Amazon basin It was clear that the women in local communities already understood the issues caused by unsustainable wildlife trade making them natural allies in efforts to change attitudes towards over exploitation of the rainforest resources said Ana Puyol Programme Officer with TRAFFIC South America Patricia Peñaherrera an expert in the development of participatory community governance processes facilitates a workshop in Gareno Click photo to enlarge Nicolás Kingman IUCN TRAFFIC 2010 Many of the women were concerned about the sale of wild meat to outside markets and the effects of over exploitation both on their own food security and on their local environment Women have a strategic role to play on the sustainable use of Amazonian biodiversity and in indigenous land management and have a wealth of traditional knowledge and practices which are key to addressing this issue By working with local women we are helping to empower them and strengthen opportunities for reflection and decision making From the outset men among the community have been consulted as part of the process too widespread community buy in for any solution to over exploitation is essential for it to be successful in the long term Ecuadorian legislation prohibits the sale of wildlife while recognizing the rights of rural dwellers to engage in subsistence hunting However wildlife from YBR is massively illegally exploited for commercial purposes mainly for consumption by Amazonian urban populations The excessive hunting of large mammals has caused their populations to decline or be threatened with extinction both outside and on the edges of conservation and sustainable use areas This is progressively degrading the quality and integrity of these areas with unpredictable consequences for the social and ecological future of such reserves reducing the quality of their natural environments Another serious consequence of the unsustainable wild meat trade is its effect on the food sovereignty of local and indigenous peoples and their opportunities to maintain long term sustainable livelihoods strategies as rodents and wild pigs are their main sources of protein Led by AMWAE a local womens group with support from TRAFFIC and two programme partners selected communities have been involved in dialogue both to recognize the extent of

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2011/2/22/women-hold-key-to-solving-wildlife-trade-issues-in-amazon.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Illegal trade in wild birds highlighted at EU wildlife trade meeting
    of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Nov 14 2008 Illegal trade in wild birds highlighted at EU wildlife trade meeting The illegal European trade in wild birds will be discussed today small songbirds like the Meadow Pipit are especially targetted Click photo to enlarge Richard Thomas TRAFFIC Brussels Belgium 14 November 2008 The illegal hunting of European wild birds for food in the European Union was raised during COM45 a meeting of EU government agencies involved in regulating wildlife trade in the region Wild birds are killed by highly organized criminals in South east and Central Europe who smuggle the carcasses to northern Italy where they are sold as a delicacy in restaurants Many of the species are protected by European Community EC and national legislation They include species in decline like the European Turtle dove Common Quail and Ortolan Bunting The majority are killed using banned hunting techniques such as catching birds in fine mistnets and attracting birds using tape lures The scale of the problem is a serious conservation concern but it has received little attention to date said Dorottya Papp Programme Officer in TRAFFIC Europe s Central Eastern Project Office The majority of bird species illegally hunted in Europe are songbirds such as finches warblers pipits and buntings which are protected under international treaties EU and national legislation particularly the EU s Birds Directive According to research by TRAFFIC the wildlife trade monitoring network hundreds of thousands of birds are illegally killed and exported in an industry worth an estimated EUR10 million per year In 2003 an Italian court determined that two hunting tourism firms had helped smuggle into Italy more than two million birds shot in Serbia over a six year period During the Italian Forestry Corp s Balkan Birds Operation a trailer was seized in November 2001 carrying 12 tonnes of deep frozen birds 120 700 specimens comprising 83 species 68 of them under a permanent hunting ban and 33 of them rare species The European Turtle dove is frequently hunted illegally and is in decline throughout much of Europe Click photo to enlarge Richard Thomas TRAFFIC In recent years the centre of illegal hunting has shifted from Hungary to Bulgaria Romania Serbia and Montenegro but also occurs in countries such as Bosnia and Herzegovina the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Albania and Croatia The main transit countries are Slovenia Croatia and Hungary from where the birds are exported to Italy The heavy involvement of Italy in the illegal trade of wild protected birds from Eastern Europe is undeniable said Massimiliano Rocco TRAFFIC Europe s National Representative in Italy and Head of WWF Italy s Species TRAFFIC Timber Trade Programmes The Italian Government needs to co operate with other national agencies and authorities to end this illicit trade through increased enforcement activities Rocco suggested the Italian authorities should also promote an information campaign in collaboration with hunting organizations to make hunters aware

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2008/11/14/illegal-trade-in-wild-birds-highlighted-at-eu-wildlife-trade.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Seizures Archive
    Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Latest seizures other reports News items on these pages are from external sources and TRAFFIC cannot be held responsible for the authenticity of their content nor for the continuing presence of original links News items are provided for information only and are not intended to represent TRAFFIC policies positions opinions or views on the issues raised in the item NOTE TRAFFIC s analyses of trade information use data compiled from official sources and not unless specifically stated from media reports A compilation of seizures and prosecutions reported in the TRAFFIC Bulletin from 1997 onwards PDF 1 6 MB Seizures News archive Entries by Month Click on a month below to view a list of articles published during that month October 2011 20

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/seizures-archive/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Publications Search Tips
    use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Publications Search Tips To get more specific Publications PDF search results try using the following tips Check spelling Use multiple words Example our free product Use similar words Example safe secure privacy security Use quotation marks Example our pledge to you Use plus or minus Example template language Use field searches Examples title about keys tiger desc trade Use wildcards Examples wh wh are Check spelling Make sure your search terms are spelled correctly The search engine will attempt to find words that sound similar to your search terms but it s always best to try to spell the search terms correctly top Use multiple words Using multiple words will return more refined results than a single word For example typing our free product will return more relevant results than typing just product Keep in mind that relevant results are returned even if they don t contain all query terms Example our free product top Use similar words The more similar words you use in a search the more relevant your results will be Example safe secure privacy security top Use quotation marks Use quotation marks to find words which must appear adjacent to each other for example our pledge to you Otherwise the search results will include the word our pledge to and the word you but not necessarily in that order The words may appear anywhere and in any order within the document Example our pledge to you top Use plus or minus Use a plus sign when your search term or phrase must appear in the search results Use a minus sign to indicate undesirable term s The plus sign tells the search engine that a certain word or phrase is required in the search results and a minus sign indicates that a word or phrase must be absent in the search results Note A phrase must be contained within quotation marks Leave no spaces between the plus or minus sign and the term Example template language top Use field searches Field searches allow you to create specific searches for words that appear in a specific part of a document A field search can be performed on body text body title text title alt text alt

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/publications-search-tips/ (2016-02-18)
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