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  • TRAFFIC - Governance
    meeting of CITES Parties TRAFFIC compiles a comprehensive overview of International trade in wildlife The TRAFFIC Bulletin the only international journal devoted exclusively to the wildlife trade issues is launched 1983 4 the TRAFFIC Bulletin publishes major studies on Indian bird elephant ivory European seal skin and reptile skin trades 1986 88 TRAFFIC undertakes an extensive review of the implementation of EU wildlife trade regulations that leads ultimately to the emergence of a new EU law which is considered one of the most comprehensive in the world 1992 TRAFFIC develops the Bad Ivory Database System BIDS to hold worldwide records of ivory seizures and confiscations In 1994 it becomes the Elephant Trade Information System ETIS and is adopted by CITES 1993 TRAFFIC publishes a review of the European medicinal plant trade and begins to asses the impact of this trade on wild plant populations and local health care systems Following an investigation by TRAFFIC the largest seizure of tiger bones ever recorded is made in India 283 kg tiger bones 8 tiger skins and 60 leopard skins 1994 TRAFFIC publishes Killed for a cure a review of the worldwide trade in tiger bone 1995 In response to an undercover TRAFFIC investigation London Metropolitan Police seize several hundred traditional Chinese medicines purporting to contain endangered species in London as part of Operation Charm 1996 TRAFFIC assists in investigations leading to arrests and seizures of ivory and shahtoosh shawls in India TRAFFIC publishes a review of the caviar trade from the Caspian Sea A year later all sturgeon species are listed in the CITES Appendices 1997 TRAFFIC reviews rhinoceros trade control legislation and presents the results to CITES Following a TRAFFIC tip off law enforcement officials seize 140 shawls in Hong Kong The dealer receives the highest financial penalty ever for a single charge of violating Hong Kong s Animal and Plants Ordinance 1998 Following TRAFFIC research on medicines in Canada and the USA claiming to contain tiger and rhinoceros ingredients the US Congress passes the Rhino and Tiger Product Labeling Act Studies by TRAFFIC reveal a twentyfold increase in the live reptile trade in the US 1999 Celebrites join TRAFFIC in calling for an end to shahtoosh trade following the release of a report entitled Fashion statement spells death for Tibetan antelope 2000 TRAFFIC assists with intelligence leading to the seizure of four tiger 70 leopard and 221 blackbuck skins and 18 000 leopard nails in India 2001 TRAFFIC completes a study on musk deer farming in China TRAFFIC raises concerns over the exploitation of Patagonian and Antarctic Toothfish particulalrly by illegal unreported and unregulated IUU vessels 2002 TRAFFIC releases a report on European sports hunting revealing that most of the income it generates does not benefit the countries where it takes place A joint WWF TRAFFIC report reveals links between organised criminal gangs and illegal wildlife traffickers 2003 A TRAFFIC report details alarming levels of illegal trade in snow leopards parts particularly pelts 2007 A major report into Tiger farming

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/governance/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Le programme de TRAFFIC
    et des comportements Réglementation efficace Les gouvernements avec les apports des parties prenantes promulguent adaptent mettent en œuvre et font appliquer des politiques et une législation qui garantissent que le commerce des animaux et des plantes sauvages ne constitue pas une menace pour la préservation de la nature Incitations économiques et sociales positives Les gouvernements et le secteur privé développent et adoptent des politiques et des pratiques économiques qui donnent lieu à des incitations et des avantages encourageant à maintenir le commerce des espèces sauvages à des niveaux durables et ils soutiennent une réglementation efficace de ce commerce Comportement durable des consommateurs Commerçants et consommateurs font des choix dans leurs décisions d achat des espèces sauvages qui ne menacent pas la préservation de la nature Connaissances mobilisées Les décideurs à tous les niveaux acquièrent et mobilisent des connaissances solides concernant la portée la dynamique et l impact du commerce des espèces sauvages sur la préservation de la nature et sa réaction à différentes mesures et approches de gestion 3 Domaines d activité Le programme de travail de TRAFFIC comporte cinq grands domaines d activité i Alerte précoce Dynamiser les réactions aux nouvelles connaissances sur la chasse des animaux sauvages les niveaux de prise et d échanges commerciaux les modèles et les tendances ii Espèces phares du commerce Mobiliser des actions urgentes en faveur des espèces emblématiques menacées d extinction qui servent de combats phares pour les défis plus généraux du commerce et de la préservation iii Sécurité des ressources et commerce des espèces sauvages Soutien aux mesures commerciales qui permettent de promouvoir des pratiques durables dans certains des principaux secteurs de ressources de la flore et de la faune sauvages iv Itinéraires du commerce des espèces sauvages Une action ciblant les itinéraires commerciaux prioritaires en vue de réduire les menaces que fait peser le commerce des espèces sauvages sur les principaux centres de biodiversité les espèces et les ressources prioritaires v Réaction rapide et innovation Réagir face aux questions régionales émergentes du commerce des espèces sauvages et promouvoir de nouvelles approches et solutions plus sur les domaines d activité 4 Les compétences fondamentales de TRAFFIC TRAFFIC est largement reconnu comme détenteur d une expertise dans un certain nombre de domaines clés La recherche Les méthodes de recherche de TRAFFIC incluent les études de marchés l évaluation des mécanismes des itinéraires de l économie et des motivations des échanges commerciaux l analyse des statistiques officielles de ce commerce la collecte des observations et constats d autres chercheurs et des enquêtes spécifiques sur les activités de commerce illégal Analyse L analyse que TRAFFIC fait des problèmes de conservation et des solutions proposées est objective multidisciplinaire et fondée sur la connaissance et elle est effectuée en collaboration avec des spécialistes d une grande variété de disciplines dont la conservation des espèces l écologie l économie et le droit Les recommandations issues de ce travail sont basées sur l expérience directe du développement et de l assistance à la mise en œuvre de solutions

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/le-programme-de-traffic/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - wider environmental concerns
    l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Wildlife trade biodiversity and wider environmental concerns TRAFFIC Southeast Asia The commercial use by people of wild animal and plant resources more simply wildlife trade is an issue at the very heart of the relationship between biodiversity conservation and sustainable development Directly and indirectly increasing demand trade and consumption is depleting the Earth s living natural resources at an alarming rate even while these same resources offer the biological foundation upon which human society depends Over exploitation of biodiversity was cited as one of the main anthropogenic drivers of biodiversity loss by the 2005 Millennium Ecosystem Assessment MA Although only one of a range of forces driving this depletion wildlife trade is central to some of the most important underlying causes of biodiversity loss Widespread poverty and insecurity drive people to adopt

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/wider-environmental-concerns/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - conservation incentives
    CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Wildlife trade people and conservation incentives Bluefin Tuna on sale Tokyo Michel Gunther WWF Canon The historical impacts of wildlife trade on the status and security of biological resources have largely been negative but the utilitarian value of wild animals plants their products and derivatives can and does make an important contribution to the fulfilment of human needs There is growing awareness of the social significance of wild resources the MA making a clear link between biodiversity ecosystem services and human well being Further a recent analysis developed by TRAFFIC demonstrated the considerable direct contribution that

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/conservation-incentives/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - scale and dynamics
    l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Scale and dynamics of the trade today Source 2005 data from Engler based on UN Statistics Division Commodity Trade Statistics Database 1995 data from Iqbal 1995 The trade in wild plants and animals and their parts and derivatives is big business The international component of the trade alone has been estimated by TRAFFIC to have been worth USD300 billion in 2005 Hundreds of millions of plants and animals are traded every year The trade is diverse ranging from live animals and ornamental plants to a vast array of wildlife products and derivatives such as fish and other food products exotic leather goods musical instruments timber tourist curios and medicines which can be found in

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/scale-and-dynamics/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - the challenge
    Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Understanding the challenge Most trade in marine turtles and their products is banned Adrian Reuter TRAFFIC Most of the trade is legal but a significant portion of it is not Both legal and illegal traders adapt to changing circumstances They target new species when others become depleted shift to new markets or in the case of illegal trade develop new smuggling methods and routes to avoid detection The globalisation of trade creation of common markets security concerns growth in organized crime and advances in technology all add further complications to the already difficult task of ensuring that trade is legal

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/the-challenge/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - action for change
    CMS Forestry Timber trade Fisheries Fisheries regulation Iconic wildlife Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks rays l Tigers l others Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Action for change Illegal trade in Asian big cat skins and other parts is a major threat Gerald S Cubitt WWF Canon There is an urgent need for knowledge and action including strengthening of the role and effectiveness of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES applying new approaches through instruments such as the Convention on Biological Diversity CBD mobilizing action by the private sector and using other regulatory and incentive mechanisms at international national and local levels to ensure that the positive values of wildlife trade are harnessed

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/action-for-change/ (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Le commerce d'espèces sauvages
    de la génération de petits profits à l échelle locale aux plus grandes entreprises à but lucratif telles que les pêcheries marines et les entreprises d exploitation forestière Entre les collectionneurs d espèces sauvages et les consommateurs un nombre incalculable d intermédiaires peut être impliqué dans le commerce d espèces sauvages comme les spécialistes en entreposage manutention transport fabrication production industrielle marketing et export ainsi que les commerces de vente En réalité nous sommes tous impliqués dans le commerce d espèces sauvages d une manière ou d une autre même en tant que simples consommateurs au bout de la chaîne de produits d espèces sauvages Échelle Le commerce d espèces sauvages implique des centaines de millions de plantes et d animaux provenant de plusieurs milliers d espèces différentes L acajou à feuilles larges Swietenia macrophylla est marqué pour abattage par les entreprises d exploitation forestière WWF Canon James FRANKHAM Le bois et les produits de la mer sont les catégories les plus importantes impliquées dans le commerce d espèces sauvages international en termes à la fois de volume et de valeur Selon l Organisation des Nations unies pour l alimentation et l agriculture FAO en anglais plus de 100 milliards de dollars de poisson a été échangé et près de 200 milliards de dollars de bois rien qu en 2009 Pour mettre cela en perspective la même année la valeur mondiale du commerce du thé du café et des épices était en tout de 24 3 milliards de dollars Rien qu en médecine on estime que 70 000 espèces de plantes ont été utilisées De plus environ 25 des médicaments de pharmacie moderne ont été développés à partir des propriétés médicinales d espèces sauvages On sait peu sur le statut de plusieurs de ces espèces sauvages bien que celles qui ont été évaluées sont dans une situation inquiétante Le problème du commerce international d espèces en conservation est géré par le CITES De 2005 à 2009 le CITES à enregistré une moyenne annuelle de plus de 317 000 oiseaux vivants un peu plus de 2 millions de reptiles vivants 2 5 millions de peaux de crocodiles 1 5 millions de peaux de lézards 2 1 millions de peaux de serpents 1 1 million de morceaux de corail et près de 20 000 trophées de chasse Tout ce commerce n est pas légal bien sûr entre 2005 et 2009 les autorités de l UE ont effectués plus de 12 000 saisies de produits illégaux d espèces sauvages à l intérieur de l UE Valeur Au début des années 1990 TRAFFIC estimait la valeur de l importation légale de produits liés aux espèces sauvages dans le monde à environ 160 milliards de dollars US En 2009 la valeur de l importation mondiale était estimée à 323 milliards de dollars US TRAFFIC estimait la valeur de l importation légale de produits liés aux espèces sauvages au sein de l UE à 93 milliards d euros en 2005 s élevant à 100 milliards d

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/le-commerce-despces-sauvages/ (2016-02-18)
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