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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Building wildlife law enforcement capacity to combat illegal wildlife trade in South-East Asia
    Darussalam Cambodia Indonesia Lao PDR Malaysia Myanmar Philippines Singapore Thailand and Viet Nam are being trained this week on how to identify threatened reptile species and familiarizing themselves with international wildlife protection policies that will enable them to combat the multimillion dollar illegal wildlife trade in the ASEAN region South East Asia has long been a hotspot in the multi billion dollar global trade of wildlife but many wild species including timber birds reptiles and mammals are illegally traded in the region According to statistics compiled by the ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network ASEAN WEN more than 16 9 tonnes of wildlife products were seized in around 200 law enforcement actions across South East Asia between January and September 2010 The ASEAN WEN also estimates that 13 000 tonnes of turtles are illegally shipped to China every year from ASEAN countries Experts from ASEAN WEN and TRAFFIC Southeast Asia will serve as trainers during the four day Training of Trainers workshop where a number of illegal trade case studies will be presented If left unchecked currents trends in the illegal wildlife trade will result in massive and irrevocable biodiversity loss The Training of Trainer workshop presents a unique opportunity to reduce this trend and to safeguard the region s precious plant and animal resources for generations to come said Mr Rodrigo U Fuentes Executive Director of the ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity ACB Mr Manop Lauprasert Senior Officer of the ASEAN WEN Program Coordination Unit added the criminals involved in the illegal wildlife trade are well organized and financed It s only by working together and pooling our skills knowledge and resources across the region can we hope to combat wildlife trafficking effectively The current course aims to equip wildlife law enforcers with skills in identifying threatened reptile species that are commonly traded familiarize them with international regulations governing wildlife trade such as those under CITES the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora and upgrade participants skills in conducting their own training courses on wildlife regulation Regional Director of TRAFFIC Southeast Asia Dr William Schaedla said We really are starting with the basics Most law enforcement personnel never get any training in areas related to wildlife crime With this course we re imparting necessary skills to the right people It is the second in a series of training workshops that seek to involve and enhance the capabilities of ASEAN and neighbouring countries in the understanding and application of taxonomic knowledge as part of a project on Taxonomic Capacity Building and Governance for Conservation and Sustainable Use of Biodiversity funded by the Japan ASEAN Integration Fund The project aims to promote the science of taxonomy which is increasingly considered a fundamental tool required by the global community to implement the Millennium Development Goals and the development targets set by the World Summit for Sustainable Development The current training course takes place from 17th 21st January at the Novotel Hotel in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia and will be conducted

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2011/1/17/building-wildlife-law-enforcement-capacity-to-combat-illegal.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Recommendations from conservation experts’ meeting available
    Regions Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday Nov 24 2011 Recommendations from conservation experts meeting available Bushmeat side event hosted by SCBD TRAFFIC IPLC left to right Louis Biswane Organisation of Kalina and Lokono in Marowijne Suriname Forest Peoples Programme Roland Melisch TRAFFIC Tim Christophersen SCBD Arturo Mora IUCN Montréal Canada 24th November 2011 recommendations from the recent Convention on Biological Diversity CBD preparatory meeting held earlier this month in Montréal have been made public PDF 230 KB During the Subsidiary Body on Scientific Technical and Technological Advice SBSTTA meeting TRAFFIC focussed its efforts on supporting the negotiations on and highlighting the needs for unanimously agreed recommendations for the sustainable use of wild fauna particularly those from tropical and subtropical forests Delegates at SBSTTA included almost 500 expert representatives from governments Parties UN agency observers Indigenous Peoples and Local Community Organisations IPLCs Inter Governmental organisations and NGOs including TRAFFIC and WWF Following some minor revisions the recommendations of the Liaison Group on Bushmeat derived from the June 2011 meeting between the CBD Liaison Group on Bushmeat and the CITES Central African Bushmeat Working Group were welcomed by the Parties to SBSTTA to be put forward for consideration at the CBD s Conference of the Parties CoP in India next year An earlier well attended side event co organised by the CBD Secretariat an IPLC organisation and TRAFFIC gave unanimous support for the recommendations on bushmeat that were under consideration by SBSTTA The recommendations had been developed in a broad participatory approach with the strong support of TRAFFIC IPLCs IUCN and WWF Roland Melisch TRAFFIC s Senior Director for Africa and Europe said The recommendations on sustainable use are a key output of this meeting of conservation experts and if adhered to by Parties will strongly help towards achieving the second objective of the CBD the sustainable use of biodiversity and its components It is heartening that the recommendations highlight the need to develop and promote methods and systems of monitoring and to support law enforcement whilst

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2011/11/24/recommendations-from-conservation-experts-meeting-available.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Radical action needed to stave off dramatic biodiversity crisis
    crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Thursday May 13 2010 Radical action needed to stave off dramatic biodiversity crisis in Japanese l en Français Nairobi Kenya Cambridge UK 13 May 2010 A UN report launched this week demonstrates how the natural systems that support economies lives and livelihoods across the planet are at risk of rapid degradation and collapse without swift effective conservation action to manage them sustainably The third edition of Global Biodiversity Outlook GBO 3 produced by the Convention on Biological Diversity CBD confirms the world has failed to meet its target to achieve a significant reduction in the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010 The Outlook warns that massive further loss of biodiversity is becoming increasingly likely and with it a severe reduction of many essential services to human societies as several tipping points are approached in which ecosystems shift to alternative less productive states from which it may be difficult or impossible to recover The tipping points include the dieback of large areas of the Amazon forest caused by a combination of climate change deforestation and fires with consequences for the global climate regional rainfall and widespread species extinctions the buildup of nutrients in freshwater lakes leading to oxygen depletion and the widespread death of fishes and the multiple collapse of coral reef ecosystems due to a combination of ocean acidification and warmer water and threatening the livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people GBO 3 uses multiple lines of evidence to demonstrate that the target set by world governments in 2002 to achieve by 2010 a significant reduction of the current rate of biodiversity loss at the global regional and national level as a contribution to poverty alleviation and to the benefit of all life on Earth has not been met Based on a special analysis of biodiversity indicators carried out by a panel of scientists as well as peer reviewed scientific literature and reports from national governments to the CBD the study found that none of the 21 subsidiary targets accompanying the overall 2010 biodiversity target can be said definitively to have been achieved globally although some have been partially or locally achieved Ten of 15 headline indicators developed by the CBD show trends unfavorable for biodiversity TRAFFIC and the IUCN SSC s Medicinal Plant Specialist group developed indicators to monitor trends in the status of wild species used for food and medicine These showed that birds and mammals used for food and medicine are generally more threatened than those that are not This may be due to over exploitation or for other reasons such as habitat loss or a

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2010/5/13/radical-action-needed-to-stave-off-dramatic-biodiversity-cri.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - South-East Asia nations discuss integration of plant conservation targets into national policies
    l Europe l Middle East Medicinal plants Medicinal and aromatic plants Wildmeat Wildmeat resources Pets fashion Wild animals used for pets fashion Search TRAFFIC NOTE To search inside TRAFFIC s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday Apr 08 2013 South East Asia nations discuss integration of plant conservation targets into national policies FairWild Standard implementation in practice at a CEPF funded project at Bac Kan Viet Nam Dr Nguyen Tap TRAFFIC Singapore 2013 Participants from countries across South East Asia plus China met last month in Singapore to develop or update national and regional plant conservation targets consistent with the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation GSPC The GSPC was adopted by parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity CBD in April 2002 and for the first time set quantitative although non binding conservation targets and a deadline for their attainment The GSPC currently has 16 targets under five objectives that include sustainable and equitable use of plant products documentation and conservation of plant diversity improving education and awareness of plants and increasing capacity for plant conservation The Regional Workshop on Reflecting in National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans NBSAPs workshop in Singapore last month was organized by the CBD Secretariat in collaboration with Botanic Gardens Conservation International and Singapore Botanical Gardens Over 30 delegates mostly national GSPC focal points took part including participants from Cambodia China Indonesia Lao PDR Malaysia Myanmar Philippines Singapore Thailand Timor Leste and Viet Nam The experiences of the participating countries varied from minimal to significant progress in developing national strategies and implementation For example Timor Leste has not started development of their national plant conservation strategy but was attending to learn more about the process while Malaysia has made significant progress especially in an inventory of national plant species TRAFFIC as a member of the Global Partnership for Plant Conservation provided specific contributions on delivery of GSPC Objective 3 Plant diversity is used in a sustainable and equitable manner and presented information on best practice tools that can be of relevance to policy makers in the region when developing and implementing sustainable use strategies for plants Chen Hin Keong TRAFFIC s Timber Trade Programme Leader spoke about TRAFFIC s work on the medicinal and aromatics plant trade the

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2013/4/8/south-east-asia-nations-discuss-integration-of-plant-conserv.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Boost for sustainable use of plants in Central America and Caribbean
    s PDFs use the Publications Search Subscribe to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Monday Nov 19 2012 Boost for sustainable use of plants in Central America and Caribbean Euphorbia antisyphilitica is wild harvested in Mexico as a source of Candelilla wax Gary Nored Flickr Creative Commons in Japanese Mexico City Mexico 19th November 2012 Representatives from seven Spanish speaking countries in Mexico Central America and the Caribbean met last week to discuss implementation of the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation GSPC in the region The GSPC is a programme of the Convention on Biological Diversity CBD whose over arching aim is to halt the continuing loss of plant diversity world wide The GSPC and the new Strategy implementation toolkit was last discussed internationally at the 11th Conference of the Parties to CBD in October 2012 in Hyderabad India Participants of the regional workshop included GSPC national focal points from the seven countries plus representatives of the Global Partnership for Plant Conservation GPPC the Botanical Gardens of New York and Costa Rica the University of Puerto Rico the Indigenous Network of Tourism in Mexico and TRAFFIC TRAFFIC spoke about the Fairwild Standard and how it could help countries implement the GSPC specifically Objective III of both the GSPC and the CBD s Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011 2020 While the GSPC targets are set at the global level the Strategy is implemented nationally TRAFFIC welcomes the update of the Mexican Strategy for Plant Conservation and encourages other Parties in Central America and the Carribean region to develop or update their national plant conservation strategies as applicable Objective III on sustainable and equitable use of wild plants is a vital step in achieving the 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets which are central to implementation of the CBD s Strategic Plan TRAFFIC shared information about FairWild Standard with participants stressing the relevance of the FairWild Standard s principles criteria and indicators in delivery on Targets 11 12 and 13 of the GSPC The FairWild Standard is highlighted as the best practice tool to deliver on Target 12 of the GSPC s implementation toolkit TRAFFIC promotes the use of the FairWild Standard principles by CBD Parties and other governments to integrate sustainable and equitable use of wild flora into National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2012/11/19/boost-for-sustainable-use-of-plants-in-central-america-and-c.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - CBD CoP11
    to news Subscribe to e Dispatches weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter Enter your Email Wildlife Trade News RSS What s RSS How to view in Chrome Donors Who supports our work TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website Also of interest Wildlife crime is serious watch the video innovate fight crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More CoP 11 Hyderabad India 8 19 October 2012 During the 11th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity CoP11 TRAFFIC will be focusing specifically on the following agenda items Agenda Item 13 6 Sustainable use of biodiversity including the Revised recommendations of the CBD s Liaison Group on Bushmeat and the Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management TRAFFIC WWF position paper on Agenda Item 13 6 PDF 350 KB TRAFFIC Paper on a questionnaire supporting Agenda Item 13 6 in relation to the suggested Collaborative Partnership on Wildlife Use PDF 320 KB Agenda Item 13 7 Global Strategy for Plant Conservation GSPC and related aspects of Agenda Item 5 3 Business and biodiversity TRAFFIC WWF position paper on Agenda Item 13 7 PDF 300 KB Agenda Item 13 10 Global Taxonomy Initiative GTI and specifically the related Capacity Building Strategy TRAFFIC will be hosting a number of side events including Sharing experiences Opportunities to Implement the Recommendations on Bushmeat Side event 2795 Tuesday 9th October 2012 at 13 15 14 45 light lunch refreshments will be served Room 2 02 Level 2 Towards the delivery of Aichi Targets 4 and 6 through the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation Sustainable Use of Wild Plant Resources Side event 2846 Friday 12th October 2012 at 18 15 19 45 light dinner refreshments will be served Room 1 09 Level 1 Going wise Mutual benefits for plant based businesses and national policy makers in sustainable use of wild plants Side event 2847 Wednesday 17th October 2012 at 18 15 19 45 light dinner refreshments will be served Room 2 HITEX 1 Ground Level Furthermore TRAFFIC is also speaking or providing input into a number of other key side events including The Biodiversity Indicators Partnership BIP and the Aichi Targets Updates on progress at the global regional and national level organised by the BIP CBD Secretariat and UNEP WCMC The BIP is supporting indicator development and use at global regional and national scales for implementation of the recommendations of SBSTTA 15 1 and SBSTTA 16 2 Side event 2591 Monday 8th October 2012 at 13 15 14 45 Food and drinks will be provided Room 1 05 Level 1 A news update on the event Biodiversity

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/cbd-cop11 (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Wild flora, sustainable use and livelihoods: progress on the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation
    CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday May 04 2012 Wild flora sustainable use and livelihoods progress on the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation Dr Peter Wyse Jackson President of Missouri Botanical Garden and Chair of the GPPC addresses a side event on capacity building for implementation of the GSPC at the CBD SBSTTA 16 meeting in Canada this week A Timoshyna TRAFFIC in Japanese Montreal Canada 4th May 2012 Plant conservation came under the spotlight during a preparatory meeting of the Convention on Biological Diversity CBD currently underway in Canada In particular discussions focused on developments with the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation GSPC whose over arching aim is to halt the continuing loss of plant diversity As the Strategy s webpage notes Without plants there is no life Generally delegates to the 16th meeting of the Susbsidiary Body on Scientific Technical and Technological Advice SBSTTA 16 who included a wide range of government representatives many from Parties to the Convention as well as non governmental organizations were pleased with progress with developing the GSPC particularly the development of the online toolkit for its implementation TRAFFIC s Medicinal Plant Programme Lead Anastasiya Timoshyna highlighted how the FairWild Standard s principles could act as a tool to assist Parties other governments and the private sector to implement particular targets within the GSPC through relevant plans programmes and policies such as National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans NBSAPs According to Timoshyna Conservation of wild plants has never been more urgent and the FairWild Standard is the right tool to help with implementation of the Strategy that will help secure the future for this invaluable resource A paper jointly submitted to the meeting by TRAFFIC and WWF also recommended the use of the FairWild Standard to verify sustainable and ethical sourcing of plants from the wild Dicscussion surrounding the GSPC were drawn to a close on Thursday with a number of recommendations now going forward for possible adoption at the Conference of the Parties taking place in October this year in India They included a call for translation of the GSPC s toolkit into the official languages of the United Nations reiterated the call to identify national focal points for the GSPC and invited the engagement with partner organizations including members of the Global Partnership for Plant Conservation GPPC to support the development and implementation of GSPC Also welcomed was the reference to a draft Resolution by the Plants Committee of CITES Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora relating to co operation between CITES and GSPC which is being submitted for consideration at the next CITES Conference of the Parties The recommendations also emphasized the importance of disaggregating information relevant to plant conservation when preparing Global Biodiversity Outlook 4 the forthcoming edition of the CBD s flagship publication On Tuesday TRAFFIC spoke about capacity building for sustainable use of

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2012/5/4/wild-flora-sustainable-use-and-livelihoods-progress-on-the-g.html (2016-02-18)
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  • TRAFFIC - Wildlife Trade News - Good governance and incentives key to addressing bushmeat trade
    crime save wildlife Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge More details Timber harvest trade in South America Europe ROUTES Partnership Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species Affiliations TRAFFIC is a founder partner of Collaborative Partnership on Sustainable Wildlife Management CPW TRAFFIC is a member of Useful links TRAFFIC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites WWF IUCN CITES More Friday Jul 15 2011 Good governance and incentives key to addressing bushmeat trade White lipped Peccaries hunted for their meat skin and teeth are disappearing from Ecuadaor s Amazonian forests because of over harvesting Click photo to enlarge Smithsonian Wild Flickr com Creative Commons Quito Ecuador 15th July 2011 Delegates to an Amazonian regional meeting of the Convention on Biological Diversity CBD will today hear how a TRAFFIC supported project offering economic alternatives to hunter communities and wild meat vendors is aiming to restore populations of wildlife depleted through over harvesting for the illegal bushmeat trade The approach towards local stakeholders needs complemented with the promotion of good governance by all local institutions and relevant ministries is proving a highly effective strategy According to Bernardo Ortiz TRAFFIC South America s Regional Director All large mammal bird and reptile species in the Amazon are threatened by illegal hunting which poses an additional risk to habitat loss and climate change According to Ortiz citing Wildlife Conservation Society data a single market in Pompeya on the margins of the Napo River Ecuadorian Amazon sold around 10 tonnes of bushmeat in a single month 60 of which comprised large mammals Such levels of harvesting are completely unsustainable and are wiping out animal species from the forest says Ortiz As part of a bushmeat awareness campaign certificates are awarded to street food sellers in Coca who commit to stop selling wild meat Click image to enlarge In response TRAFFIC is helping implement a project in Ecuador s Amazonian Orellana province which aims to reduce the illegal trade in bushmeat through promoting alternatives for local people such as small scale cocoa plantations without promoting deforestation fish farming ecotourism and through education about the effects of over harvesting Hunting for local subsistence purposes has been ongoing ever since humans have lived in the Amazon but the problem of over harvesting has skyrocketed because of high demand from a rapidly growing population combined with the fashion for eating wild animals in the towns and cities of the region and even among tourists seeking to experience the real Amazon says Ortiz A few years ago troops of hundreds of White lipped Peccaries were a common sight in the forest but nowadays can only be found in remote areas They are hunted for their meat skin and teeth the latter used to make handicrafts Other species threatened by over harvesting include tapirs whose meat is sold as an exotic food to tourists and settlers while their skin is used for clothing and their nails as medicine As species vanish the

    Original URL path: http://www.traffic.org/home/2011/7/15/good-governance-and-incentives-key-to-addressing-bushmeat-tr.html (2016-02-18)
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