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  • Careers Advice - UKWDA
    7 of the world s population now uses the internet 160 billion emails are sent every day and it s estimated that the number of websites has now exceeded a whopping 182 million As people continue to feed their addiction to the internet there s never been a better time to launch your career as a web designer or developer So where s the best place to start what areas should you focus on and how should you best approach winning your dream job Which role is right for you That s where the UKWDA s Careers Advice pages come in You ll find primers to help you get started and decide whether a web design or developer role is right for you Discover where the main employment opportunities lie what training to consider and what the top jobs pay You ll also explore whether to become a specialist or a generalist whether you d like to work for a small or large organisation and whether to take the plunge and go freelance Practical CV and interview help We also offer practical help and advice when it comes to applying for jobs with our guide to writing your CV You ll discover how CVs are a great way to sell yourself why it s important to put yourself in your potential employer s shoes and an accepted and effective way of putting your CV together And we offer guidance for winning at that all important interview from what you should wear to a simple strategy for dealing with nerves and even why it can be helpful to feel a little anxious we take a detailed look at the interview process and explore the best ways to prepare for interview success Next Getting Started in Web Design THE UKWDA About Us

    Original URL path: http://www.ukwda.org/careers-advice (2016-02-18)
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  • Career Advice - UKWDA
    may require specific coding the core foundations of a site to meet a specific need Career options For suitably qualified candidates the employment opportunities on offer are diverse large design consultancies small digital agencies internet hosting firms or a company s in house communications or IT department these are all potential employers for web designers and developers And while working in house or for an agency brings with it the stability of a regular salary and the chance to work within a team environment and on a broad range of projects another route many web designers and developers opt for is working as an independent contractor or freelancer There are pros and cons to freelancing and it certainly isn t for everyone You may be able to set your own hours but you ll also need to sell your time and develop a range of small business skills But there are those that swear by it and would never dream of going back to work for someone else Roles The exact role of a web designer or developer is likely to vary from organisation to organisation Some may want a Jack or Jill of all trades and require you to pitch in wherever needed from selling ideas to clients to writing website content other roles may be more focused on a particular task such as laying out or coding pages to other people s ideas or specifications or taking the lead creative role The skill sets required vary greatly too as a web designer you may be able to get by using an application like Adobe Dreamweaver which allows you to lay out pages knowing little or even no HTML or you may need to be an HTML hotshot and know your CSS inside out and even your FTP PHP

    Original URL path: http://www.ukwda.org/careers-advice/getting-started-in-web-design (2016-02-18)
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  • Becoming a Web Designer - UKWDA
    in how sites look Are you a creative artistic person And do you like working with computers and perhaps learning new software packages Would you like to learn professional software like Adobe Dreamweaver or Photoshop And finally are you the kind of person who pays attention to detail and who would be good at interpreting someone else s brief If all of this sounds like you then it s certainly worth thinking through some of the other factors involved with becoming a web designer People skills count You may have visions of shutting yourself away all day with your computer and your favourite radio station and creating in your home office While that may well be possible for some of the time it s also useful to have or develop another set of skills around successfully working with other people You ll need to listen to what s required take the brief ask pertinent questions and reach a solid understanding of what will make your client happy And then ensure that your work delivers or meets the brief Little or large Being a web designer may also involve working as part of a team If you work in a larger design or advertising agency your team may be led by an account manager who liaises with the client you may work under a creative director and alongside copywriters photographers other web designers and web developers those responsible for programming sites and ensuring any special functionality works as it should Equally you may work for a much smaller company where you re in charge of all things web in this case you ll still need to be team minded as it s in smaller organisations where pitching in to help out is often essential So one day you may be presenting

    Original URL path: http://www.ukwda.org/careers-advice/becoming-a-web-designer (2016-02-18)
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  • Becoming a Web Developer - UKWDA
    t yet learned to program in the technologies that make the web tick You ll also need a strong measure of patience to be methodical and have an inquisitive mind Although not essential if you have an eye for what looks good on the web that s sure to stand you in good stead too Start at the start When it comes to skills a great place to start is with learning HTML and CSS the basic building blocks of pages on the web Although WYSIWYG What You See Is What You Get programmes like Adobe Dreamweaver make it possible for some designers to bypass the need to learn these core skills most web developers would be expected to be able to code using only a simple text editor Then there are other languages that can add functionality to websites an understanding of PHP and databases like MySQL is particularly useful when working with dynamic websites such as the increasing numbers powered by a content management system CMS to store and call up content from a database into page templates when required JavaScript is another language well worth mastering Not only is it useful for adding functionality to web pages but it can also be used in applications beyond the web Ajax can also complement your HTML and CSS skills and there are various other programming languages from Perl to ASP that can be useful additions to your web developer s toolkit Developing your understanding of web standards as outlined by the World Wide Web Consortium W3C and how different browsers may render pages differently is another element that will help you troubleshoot websites more effectively Capitalise on mobile As a web developer it will also be useful to keep an eye on other technologies that are rising in popularity Multimedia content is being increasingly used on all kinds of websites so understanding something of the technology behind this could be useful And of course use of mobile web and tablet computing is exploding More and more organisations want to ensure their content works on these new platforms and furthermore have a need to develop specialist applications or apps for new devices Knowledge too of how to host websites how to install and upgrade software like a CMS on a web server and of associated areas such as the domain name system DNS mail servers firewalls and security is all likely to prove invaluable Develop your soft skills As well as the technical know how having appropriate soft skills could make the difference that transforms you from being just a geek to offering a really valuable service Being able to explain technical issues to a non technical audience has got to be near the top of the list as have listening skills to understand your client s needs and the ability to work with others like other developers designers and account managers Specialists vs generalists It s worth thinking about what kind of role you d like in the future

    Original URL path: http://www.ukwda.org/careers-advice/becoming-a-web-developer (2016-02-18)
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  • Training & Certification - UKWDA
    as web designers developers or perhaps working in other specialised fields such as mobile platforms and security In fact there s never been a better time to take advantage of the demand for skilled individuals but it s crucial to take a measured approach before diving in Weigh up the pros and cons and take a long hard look at what opportunities are really available where the work is and which skills are required by employers And then consider how well you ll measure up and how you ll need to brush up your skills to make the grade Demonstrate your skills It s important both to be competent and appear competent to an employer so investing in high quality certified training which will demonstrate your competencies should be high on your list of priorities whether you re already employed in the industry and want to widen your skill base or you re just starting out and want to acquire the necessary skills to enter the industry as a web designer or web developer for the first time The UKWDA offers a range of training courses covering all the key skills you ll need to kickstart and develop your career

    Original URL path: http://www.ukwda.org/careers-advice/training-and-certification (2016-02-18)
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  • Employed or Freelance? - UKWDA
    customers that they will be happy to pay you for but you ll also have all the other complexities of running a small business to think about from keeping the books to selling your services Train for success If you re starting from scratch you ll want to get some solid training under your belt and try to build up a portfolio of work you can show to potential clients even if you start off donating some time to worthy causes Make sure you re familiar with the tools of your trade such as Adobe Dreamweaver and Photoshop and develop your skills in HTML and CSS You may also want to broaden your web design skills so you can build interactive or content managed sites you might want to learn a little about scripting and how dynamic sites work for example Many customers like to be able to update their own sites so it s certainly worth thinking about whether you ll be able to offer them that ability It s all learnable Like the web design skills the business skills you ll need are learnable too there s plenty of information and advice out there to help you set up on your own and many people have launched their own businesses before you Freelancing isn t for everyone but many people who work for themselves say they could never go back to having a boss there s no one to answer to but yourself you can decide your hours work from home and listen to whatever music you like while you re working There can be downsides about freelance working though it can be lonely with no one to bounce ideas off or share decisions with you have to find solutions to problems on your own and you re responsible for everything like maintaining your computer and ordering supplies And the bottom line is if you don t sell enough of your time you won t have enough money to pay yourself So it s important to weigh up the pros and cons very carefully before taking the plunge Ask yourself if you re the sort of person who could make it on your own And crucially have you got what it will take to sell Do the groundwork You can get started by putting together a business plan however brief before taking the freelance plunge There are plenty of online resources to help you think this through Here are some points to consider What you are actually going to offer At what price Who will you sell it to How will you communicate your offer to them How long will it take to deliver How many of these do you need to sell to cover your costs and keep you in the style to which you ve become accustomed How much time will you allocate to business areas like marketing and finance each week Do you have a market niche Who are your competitors What do they offer

    Original URL path: http://www.ukwda.org/careers-advice/employed-or-freelance (2016-02-18)
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  • How to write a CV - UKWDA
    also useful to put yourself in the shoes of a busy employer they may have lots of applications to sift through perhaps even hundreds so your task is to make your CV stand out for the right reasons and not the wrong ones so it makes it onto the shortlist pile not into the recycling bin These are the sections that people usually like to include Personal details The generally accepted place to start is with your personal details On the face of it this bit s pretty easy put your name at the top in bold and larger type and then in a normal sized font add your address s put both if you spend term time in one place and holidays in another telephone number s and email address You don t usually need to include information about your age date of birth marital status or health Make sure that your outgoing voicemail messages sound business like and you are using a serious sounding email address for job application purposes Include a web address if you want to it could swing the balance if the post you re after is web related but make sure the url is appropriate and the site adds value to your pitch Remember there s no guarantee that your site will be viewed unless an employer has specifically asked to see work examples online Education This usually comes next Put down the details of your education and training specifying courses institutions dates and ideally grades achieved Work experience Not only list any you have including voluntary or work experience roles but give more detail about your responsibilities and what you learned Relate this to the job you re applying for So time spent work shadowing in a design studio might have taught you much about the process of completing a creative project for example Or a job in a café may have taught organisational leadership and people skills probably more important to mention than those great cappuccinos you learned how to make Achievements interests responsibilities You can vary the title of this section to suit you and if you don t have much work experience here s your opportunity to shine Try to show a range of interests and describe how these demonstrate personal qualities ideally those required for the job in question For example ability to work with others take responsibility stretch yourself problem solve etc References Include two or have them up your sleeve and put available on request Generally one would be an academic referee like a tutor and another work related such as a previous or current employer Top tip consult with them before you include them Other headings Some people like to include a brief summary of their career aims or a personal profile These are generally short sharp and well written in the third person Often they appear after personal details You could also include a section on your technical skills or software you re proficient at

    Original URL path: http://www.ukwda.org/careers-advice/how-to-write-a-cv (2016-02-18)
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  • Interview Techniques - UKWDA
    a particular brief rather than that you just thought that a particular design worked well for its own sake So rehearse how you will show your work smoothly on a computer hard copies etc and prepare something to say about each piece but also prepare to be interrupted with questions and only have time to show a few examples Types of interview Interviews can be one to one or more commonly you ll be seen by two or more people You may even find yourself being interviewed with other candidates or at least run into them while you wait If the job is in another city or even another country you may be interviewed by phone at least as an initial filtering process and nowadays it s not uncommon for video services like Skype to be used to cut travel costs The main thing is to try to find out in advance what form the interview will take Ask about interview length whether any tests might be involved and whether you should bring anything in particular And of course double check the location of the interview allow yourself plenty of time on the day and work out and if necessary even rehearse your route parking transport etc beforehand The aim is to prepare as well as you can and avoid feeling surprised on the day so you can focus on what s going on in the interview itself Practice makes perfect While you can t know what questions you ll be asked you can make a fair guess So it s always worth putting yourself in your interviewer s shoes and thinking about the post in advance reading the job and person description and predicting the main questions you ll be asked Then work out your answers thinking about how you can distinguish yourself from other candidates How much time you invest preparing depends on how much you want the job but you could do far worse than running over the questions with a friend with them playing the part of the interviewer to perfect your answers Ask them for their honest feedback afterwards What could you do better And if you re really serious try videoing yourself in your mock interview when you play it back notice which questions you answered well which other points you could make and which distracting habits you display that it would be worth trying to eliminate Choose whether you feel nervous or confident As well as running through possible questions some experts recommend other mental techniques for optimum performance and suggest that there is a choice as to whether you feel nervous confident or any other state An approach ahead of the interview is to think about what frame of mind would be most useful say it s determined and then fully remember a time when you felt that way As you do this tap a finger onto your thumb to help you remember what determined is like for you and when you

    Original URL path: http://www.ukwda.org/careers-advice/interview-techniques (2016-02-18)
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