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  • Rio+20 : Implementation of the SEEA: the international statistical standard for environmental-economic accounting
    Nations IGOs Information Lead organizer Institute of Geography and Statistics 17 30 19 00 Date 14 Jun 2012 Room T 9 Implementation of the SEEA the international statistical standard for environmental economic accounting Organizing partners Institute of Geography and Statistics Brazil Introduction Twenty years ago Agenda 21 sought a systems approach to monitoring the transition to sustainable development and noted the need for the development of integrated environmental economic accounts Following two decades of development of methods and practical experience in countries the Central Framework of the System of Environmental Economic Accounting SEEA was recently adopted by the UN Statistical Commission as an international standard The Statistical Commission further requested the Committee of Experts on Environmental Economic Accounting UNCEEA to develop an implementation programme SEEA is a tool for statistical systems for integrating and organizing information on the economy and the environment to produce a wide range of indicators for analysis of sustainable development Detailed programme The purpose of the side event it to initiate a discussion on strategies to implement the SEEA learning from what has worked or has not worked in countries so far Particularly at the early stages of implementation of SEEA international cooperation and coordination of efforts will be critical This event will be an opportunity for sharing experiences in regards to the technical challenges but also on the benefits of SEEA implementation in countries where accounts have already been produced and used for decision making The side event will be chaired by Peter Harper Chair UN Committee of Experts on Environmental Economic Accounts and Deputy Australian Statistician It is organized in the form of a panel with panellists consisting of the following participants Wasmalia Bivar President of the Institute of Geography and Statistics Brazil Geert Bruinooge Deputy Director General Statistics Netherlands Walter Radermacher Chief Statistician

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=611&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Indigenous Peoples, Food Sovereignty + Sustainable Development
    Executive Director IITC Saul Vicente Vasquez IITC Board Member and Expert Member of the UN Permanent Forum of Indigenous Issues UNPFII Mirna Cunningham Chair of the UNPFII Global Fund for Women Board Member President of the Center for Autonomy and Development of Indigenous Peoples CADPI Jorge Mani Stanley Kuna Youth Movement Indigenous Member of the UN Committee on Food Security Marcos Terena Coordinator of the Comité Intertribal Memoria e Ciencia ITC Phrang Roy Assistant President on Special Assignment for Indigenous and Tribal Issues of the International Fund for Agricultural Development IFAD Coordinator for the International Indigenous Partnership on Agrobiodiversity and Food Sovereignty The panel will also include an African representative TBA Detailed programme The International Indian Treaty Council IITC will host a panel discussion on Indigenous Peoples Priorities for Ensuring Food Sovereignty in the Context of Local and Global Sustainable Development For Indigenous Peoples the right to food in terms of security and sovereignty is an inseparable part of the integrated struggle for rights to land resources and culture The food systems that have traditionally nourished Indigenous communities are endangered by not only the obvious threats of environmental contamination deforestation and climate change but also by the loss of traditional knowledge and practice This panel of distinguished Indigenous experts will explore strategies and methods that utilize traditional knowledge cultural resources and indicators together with a human rights based approach to ensure food security and the development of real food sovereignty within the context of sustainable development on local and global levels What does food sovereignty and Indigenous Peoples rights have to do with sustainable development The struggles faced by Indigenous Peoples have consequences far beyond the survival of individual cultures or communities It is no coincidence that Indigenous land while only 22 of the world s landmass holds almost 90

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=282&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Youth Perspective on Environmental Issues in Contemporary Societies
    IGOs Information Lead organizer Geneva International Model United Nations GIMUN 17 30 19 00 Date 14 Jun 2012 Room T 5 Youth Perspective on Environmental Issues in Contemporary Societies Organizing partners GIMUN BIMUN EMMUNET JUNON Introduction GIMUN is a United Nations accredited NGO holding Special Consultative Status to the UN Economic and Social Council ECOSOC Our goal is to promote the ideals and principles of the United Nations among youth particularly amongst students Youth Perspectives our next event is about giving the opportunity to young people engaged in the topic that is discussed to give their opinion We want to reach conclusions that reflect the position of youth on central topics of contemporary international relations The aim is to bring young people to discuss their points of view to precise their opinions and to develop in a coherent way drafts of solutions to current issues Detailed programme During the three days of the conference 100 participants aged 16 to 28 years old will share their opinions and expectations on environmental issues in contemporary societies through four different committees each dealing with a different aspect of the issue These committees are 1 Modern societies weaknesses facing environmental catastrophes 2 Degrowth a solution to protect the environment 3 Protecting biodiversity issues of urbanism 4 Future of traditional knowledge threats and solutions At the end of the third day each committee will adopt a final report which will be further voted upon by the Youth Perspectives General Assembly composed of all participants thus legitimizing the outcome document The outcome document will give an overview on many topics that will be discussed in Rio and will give the opportunity to Young people to participate actively in the Rio 20 process held by the UN From a general perspective we want to allow rich and

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=302&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Transboundary Waters, Climate Change and Good Governance
    essential to protect vital freshwater ecosystems their functions and services Since 2006 WWF and its partners have been working to build awareness of the convention and its principles in an effort to strengthen international water law Detailed programme Thematic Focus Water Security Transboundary water issues have cross cutting implications for the aims of Rio 20 This side event will focus on the UNWC as a tool to fill in gaps in the institutional framework for sustainable development and also as a framework to address water related impacts from climate change in the context of a green economy In the world s 276 transboundary basins climate change is already affecting freshwater and related natural resources that are shared by two or more countries requiring closer levels of cooperation These effects extend beyond the local level impacting global natural social economic and political systems and thus requiring a global response Yet adaptation to climate change has been considered primarily at the local level Moreover national policies to adapt to and mitigate climate change if poorly planned and unsustainably developed and operated may have unforeseen or unintended transboundary consequences on water resources These threats and trends are expected to put pressure on already fragile ecosystems and communities harm crucial ecosystems services and increase the potential for conflict across international borders To address these issues and other freshwater related concerns requires a reliable yet sufficiently flexible legal and institutional framework to govern transboundary waters at various levels The UNWC as a global framework guiding and supporting transboundary water cooperation including in the context of climate change can play this role by supplementing cooperation efforts at regional basin and sub basin levels With respect to the institutional framework the UNWC has several important roles As the only MEA adopted as part of Rio 92 that has not yet entered into force commitments toward its ratification and implementation will signal a renewed political commitment toward sustainable development The international community increasingly recognizes that the real water crisis is one of governance support for a global legal framework will help address this ensuring the availability of water for economic social and environmental needs The UNWC can also strengthen the institutional framework through its linkages with other MEAs including the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change the UN Convention to Combat Desertification the Ramsar Convention and the Convention on Biological Diversity among others Having in place an effective UNWC will enable the establishment of stronger linkages with those agreements as well as the promotion of the Convention s aims principles and procedures to a wider audience Water s role in the economy and especially in a green economy cannot be overstated Transboundary waters in particular are a vital source of freshwater and related ecosystem services for 40 of the world s population in 145 countries Climate change will affect all freshwater resources but transboundary waters are particularly vulnerable Where water resources are internationally shared effective responses to climate change and other efforts to ensure a green economy will

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=464&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Learning from the MDGs: SDGs within a transformative post-2015 development agenda
    proposals for SDGs in the outcome document of Rio 20 in light of these lessons and outline concrete ideas for a transformative post 2015 development agenda Detailed programme The Millennium Development Goals MDGs are eight international development goals that all 193 United Nations member states and at least 23 international organizations have agreed to achieve by the year 2015 Progress towards reaching the goals has been uneven Some countries have achieved many of the goals while others are not on track to realize any The MDG 10 summit in September 2010 reviewed progress to date and concluded with the adoption of a global action plan to accelerate progress in the final run up to 2015 However even if the MDG targets are met there are also significant criticisms of the MDG framework itself One criticism is that the MDG approach departs from a human rights based framework and potentially diminishes gains enshrined in international human rights treaties For instance goal 2 ignores the crucial requirement of free primary education which is an immediate obligation in international human rights treaties Another concern is that the MDG targets ignore inequity Other concerns include the lack of participation of Southern countries and civil society organizations in drafting the Goals and targets and the lack of effective accountability mechanisms for the MDGs particularly for donor countries In this context Member States the UN system and civil society are beginning a global discussion on the possible contours of a post 2015 development agenda In the lead up to Rio 20 Member States such as Colombia and Guatemala are proposing that a key outcome of the Rio 20 process should be the definition and agreement towards sustainable development goals similar and supportive of the MDGs This is already being considered by some as a possible successor

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=548&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Oxfam International Youth Partnerships: Youth fixing the broken system
    the broken food system Using strategies based on the protection and realisation of all human rights these young people provide an insight into how we can address issues land and water access support small scale producers particularly women and grow a global good food movement to create a just and sustainable global food system where everyone has enough to eat always Detailed programme Food justice is under the spotlight now more than ever as food and fuel prices continue to rise chronic hunger and vulnerability becomes a reality for more people as each day passes the impacts of climate change grow more evident and widespread natural resources become eroded and scarce sustainable production in constrained and access to land markets and technology is an increasing challenge for vast populations High levels of youth unemployment coupled with large proportions of young people from Africa Asia and Oceania being employed in the agricultural sector and other low income sectors demonstrate that young people particularly young women are most particularly vulnerable to the impacts of the global food crisis This is further exacerbated by the fact that young people experience greater isolation and alienation from decision making processes that directly affect them As stated in the 2010 World Youth Report young women are likely to be the most seriously affected by compromised food security The results of research carried out in India indicate that nutritional deficits are greater among girls than among boys when food is scarce and or when food prices are high UNICEF s 2011 State of the World s Children Report highlights the importance of working with adolescents and young people for the creation of healthy equitable societies Investment in well informed and empowered citizens can lead to healthier populations stronger economic growth and more cohesive communities When young people are involved in broader peer and community initiatives they bring into play fresh perspectives and a strong sense of commitment that can result in innovative solutions especially in the midst of complex crises Youth engagement can enhance collective action increasing pressure on governments to provide good public services and driving social economic and political change The report also highlights that despite the evidence of the benefits of engaging young people in decision making processes the reality is that most young people do not have access to decision making processes that affect their development OIYP s Rio 20 youth delegation includes the following 15 young leaders who are dedicated to creating long term and sustainable change Ulviyya Abdullayeva Good food movement small scale producers and environmental sustainability Azerbaijan Female Ulviyyais working with a broad coalition of farmers environmentalists community leaders and concerned citizens to establish a nation wide food justice movement that aims to change behaviour and consumption patterns of the broader Azerbaijan community in order to support local farmers reduce environmental impacts and to improve health outcomes in her community Daniel Chrisendo Land Grabbing Male Sumatra Daniel works to support small scale farmers to advocate and raise awareness about the

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=192&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : National Sustainable Development Strategies-What's Their Future Role?
    to formulate national sustainable development strategies NSDS The Zero Draft of the Rio 20 outcome document again underlines in chapter IV section D Regional national local institutional framework for Sustainable Development the need for continuing and deepening the efforts in this respect Closely related to NSDS are also approaches for measuring and evaluating sustainable development in order to provide an evidence base for a sustainable development policy The sustainable development definition provided by the Brundtland Commission builds the basis for the NSDS strategy and indicator systems in Switzerland and Liechtenstein As a NSDS strategy requires ongoing monitoring Switzerland and Liechtenstein have established NSDS strategy review mechanisms to constantly monitor their NSDS strategy developments Switzerland s and Liechtenstein s approaches are part of a broader movement in Europe in particular where all the relevant initiatives are shared and actors meet in the European Sustainable Development Network ESDN www sd network eu The European Union s sustainable development strategy builds a common reference framework As NSDS strategies must be as measurable as possible Switzerland established the indicator system MONET www monet admin ch Liechtenstein has adopted as well an indicator system to assess the progress and implementation gaps concerning sustainability These indicator systems take a holistic approach to measure sustainable development which includes quality of life for the present generation and an equitable distribution of costs and benefits across time Therefore both indicator systems track whether or not the two countries are on the path to sustainable development and if so in which areas Indicators are selected on the basis not of political targets but of a methodical concept that is made up of a reference framework and a systemic structure This approach ensures that these indicator systems are independent transparent and comprehensive Furthermore the two indicator systems enable a comparison with

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=396&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Green Economy and Trade - Assessing Risks and Opportunities
    In order to inform the Rio 20 dialogue on trade and green economy this side event will focus on the trade opportunities associated with the transformation to a green economy A recent study completed by UNEP ITC and ICTSD will be presented mapping and analysing existing trade related opportunities for developing countries in the transition to a green economy Detailed programme There are compelling reasons for moving towards a green economy not least of which are planetary limits imposing constraints to economic growth as traditionally measured UNEP s report entitled Towards a Green Economy Pathways to Sustainable Development and Poverty Eradiation makes the case for investing in the green economy and outlines the policies that governments can use to promote a green economy transformation One policy area which is critical across economic sectors and for all countries is international trade Trade can allow international demand to deplete natural resources and lead to increased pollution and carbon emissions However trade also has the potential to drive a green economy by fostering sustainable resource use generating economic opportunities and employment and by contributing to poverty eradication Much of the dialogue on the green economy and trade in the context of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development Rio 20 have focused on the risks associated with a transition to a green economy In particular several developing countries have voiced concern over the potential for the concept of a green economy to provide cover for protectionist measures or restrictions on international trade Although much of the international focus has been on risks the transition to a green economy presents a number of trade opportunities for developing countries It is crucial to identify these trade opportunities together with the policy reforms that can create and strengthen developing country capacity to benefit from the opportunities

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=26&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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