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  • Rio+20 : Global Governance Mechanisms for Boosting Green Innovation
    innovative solutions to key emerging issues of global concern in the area of sustainable development Based on UNU s experience the capacity of societies to innovate locally is essential to generate viable global solutions Thus within the scope of the two main themes proposed for the conference the speakers will discuss two points related to innovation should be highlighted during Rio 20 The first point is to create mechanisms to identify and generate Innovative Solutions both technological and institutional that will have large positive impacts on societies Those innovations have to cut across sectors and regions and lead to radical impacts on the way our societies use environmental resources and distribute its benefits Incremental small changes towards sustainable development are still important but only with more radical changes can we achieve suggested international goals such as reductions in greenhouse gas emissions or preservation of biodiversity in order to avoid future unsustainable paths Thus besides the effective implementation of individual projects and programmes innovative initiatives with much larger impact are necessary The second point is to create governance mechanisms that facilitate the dynamic exchange of knowledge and resources locally and globally to generate and diffuse the innovative solutions we need for radical changes We have to create mechanisms that facilitate the development of local innovation capacities in order to scale up innovations As many of the solutions to global concerns emerge at the local level we require local and global efforts to create the capacity to innovate locally and spread those innovations globally to those who need them Local groups must be able to adopt the best technologies for their local needs absorb new technologies and create the institutional mechanisms to increase their benefits Thus we need to understand global mechanisms that facilitate the diffusion of knowledge and resources to enable

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=93&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Voices from Asia Pacific: Just and Sustainable Development Goals for Women
    and representation transparency and accountability international cooperation and solidarity determine people s development Detailed programme Context As the draft outcome document for Rio 20 recognises the world has been experiencing unprecedented multiple interrelated crises in economy energy food environment climate and deepening poverty Those crises are experienced most acutely by women particularly marginalised women of Asia Pacific The main response to global poverty in the past 20 years has been to stimulate private capital and provide an enabling environment for foreign investment Economic growth it was assumed would provide benefits to all and would be the best model to address poverty inequality and therefore create an environment where human rights can be more fully enjoyed However it is increasingly recognised that this model is both unsustainable as it promotes large scale industrialization mining and consumption and unable to facilitate human development Rather in many cases it has heightened inequality ref UN Human Dev Report 2010 To date global efforts to reduce GHG emissions to live sustainably and to reduce poverty have failed those that are most affected by these crises The models adopted in the past 20 years are clearly inadequate Small island states and developing countries in the South have been facing more frequent and more severe disasters causing unimaginable human loss and suffering Some solutions have been equally as devastating for rural and indigenous women of the South Alternative energy options designed to reduce consumption of conventional fuels i e production of biofuel have required large scale land conversion resulting in water scarcity soil degradation loss of biodiversity and displacement of farmers At the same time the scale and amount of extraction of resources including coal and other mineral mining and logging are not declining Price increases for food and energy have the most impact on poor women

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=178&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : TEEB for Water and Wetlands
    TEEB for Water and Wetlands Organizing partners Ramsar Convention on Wetlands Norway Switzerland and Finland Introduction The Millennium ecosystem assessment MA 2005 presented a solid evidence base on the loss of wetlands and associated loss of ecosystem services This was a seminal piece of work clarifying to the biodiversity community and wider scientific establishment the need for action There was however insufficient policy response The TEEB initiative which built on the MA has demonstrated the policy usefulness of presenting economic arguments on the value of nature and targeting the messages to different audiences international and national policy makers local and regional policy makers and administrators business the academic community and citizens www teebweb org TEEB 2008 2009 2010 2011 The use of the tools and language of economics can help communicate to some audiences that might otherwise overlook the importance of nature Detailed programme The proposed TEEB water and wetlands synthesis aims to use the TEEB approach to generate better understanding of the ecosystem service values of water and wetlands to encourage additional policy momentum and business commitment for their conservation and wise use By using the arguments based on ecological and economic evidence base the report would strive to

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=190&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Sustainable Development index methodology-possible options
    Conference based on its own experience and recent achievements across the globe Detailed programme During the Rio Summit in 1992 it was decided to develop a Sustainable Development Index in the coming years Countries and international organizations were invited to make their contribution This target has not been fully achieved during the last 20 year Several multi stakeholders consultation processes conducted in Armenia within the framework of Rio 20 preparation analysis of different thematic and assessment reports including Human development report and others Experts observations have revealed that those assessments and statement on the progress achieved doesn t necessarily reflect the country s reality Meeting of the National Council on Sustainable Development stressed the necessity of improvement of assessment methodology and monitoring tools as a whole emphasizing the need for most adequate assessment tools to reflect specific peculiarities for the countries It should be stated that several activities were conducted on improving the development assessment methodology The United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development formulated a set of sustainable development indicators tested by 22 countries along with Eurostat the Statistical Office of the EU The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development OECD focused on integrated economic environmental and social frameworks to measure sustainable development in order to develop statistical indicators for sustainability OECD 2004 A Eurostat task force of national experts established in 2001 set out to develop indicators to support the EU Sustainable Development Strategy and published sets of indicators in 2005 and 2007 Different scientific institutions have conducted research on the Indicators and Indexes for measuring the progress Environment Performance Index by Yale and Colombia Universities etc The latest UNDP 2011 global human development report incorporated also some environmental components Though only a few indicators were used this is very much in line of integration of environmental indexes into HDI what Armenia was proposing in 2005 In addition many countries have developed their own sustainable development indicator sets to assess progress towards goals in national plans or strategies for sustainable development The UN in Armenia spearheaded by UNDP supported independent expert analysis in 1995 towards the transformation of HDI into SD index thus elaboration of the respective methodology for calculating comprehensive sustainable development index was conducted The methodology considering also environmental component used the same principles applied in the Human Development Index to ensure comparability of data In 1996 2006 the National Statistics Service used this methodology for calculation of sustainable development index in Armenia However there was no generally accepted set of indicators for calculation of progress in sustainable development except for a few initiatives Taking into consideration that Armenia was one of the first countries piloting calculation of SD indexes the Armenian Government decided to update the existing set of SD indicators and to present the country s approaches to the issue at the side event during the RIO 20 Conference based on its own experience and recent achievements across the globe Meantime additional involvement of relevant international institutions and experts will create a good platform for

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=214&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : The Future We Want: Biodiversity in the Sustainable Development Goals
    Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity CBD in 2010 and later endorsed by the 66th session of the United Nations General Assembly sets out a vision for a world of Living in harmony with nature where By 2050 biodiversity is valued conserved restored and wisely used maintaining ecosystem services sustaining a healthy planet and delivering benefits essential for all people The strategic plan and its vision represent a long term plan that supports the three pillars of sustainable development The side event will outline these linkages and a vision for the way forward Detailed programme Biological diversity underpins ecosystem functioning and the provision of ecosystem services essential for human well being It provides for food security human health the provision of clean air and water it contributes to local livelihoods and economic development and is essential for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals including poverty reduction Accordingly the goals of the Rio 20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development to promote a green economy for sustainable development and poverty eradication and enhance the institutional framework for sustainable development can be realized by taking into account the contribution of biodiversity and ecosystem services In 2010 governments adopted the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011 2020 and the Aichi biodiversity targets at the tenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biodiversity Subsequently the plan was adopted as the guidance for the United Nations system as a whole The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011 2020 and the Aichi biodiversity targets provide a compelling vision and enabling framework for the realization of sustainable production and consumption in a participatory and inclusive manner and in that regard will support food security sustainable water management and the foundations for a green economy for sustainable development and poverty eradication The successful

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=508&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Securing a sustainable and equitable future for all post-Rio+20
    One Planet Living framework There will be a number of commitments being made by civil society business and governments for post Rio 20 implementation Presentations and commitments will be made by the governments of Belgium Colombia and Kenya multinational retailer Kingfisher plc globally recognised planners and developers from Portugal and China Pelicano and China Merchants Property Developer CMPD South America s largest refridgeration supplier Imbera and international social enterprise BioRegional Detailed programme Thematic focus Sustainable development frameworks Principles and goals for the Green Economy One Planet Living is a vision of a sustainable world in which people everywhere can enjoy a high quality of life within the productive capacity of the planet It follows 10 principles of sustainability as a guiding framework Zero Carbon Zero Waste Sustainable Transport Sustainable Materials Local and Sustainable Food Sustainable Water Land and Wildlife Culture and Heritage Equity and Local Economy Health and Happiness Originally designed for planning sustainable communities in 2002 One Planet Living has been found to be scale able and adaptable to different sectors and audiences and is now being used in 11 countries by organisations which employ 80 000 people and have annual revenues of 25 billion At this side event BioRegional will outline One Planet Living approach and then retailers and housing developers will briefly explain how the framework has been embedded in their operations and show the outcomes of their sustainability initiatives in practice There will then be a wider input of views by governments towards the development of SDGs and the creation of National Implementation Plans Government representatives will describe how these proposals are being taken forward at national and international levels to achieve sustainable development in both the global north and south Participants will be shown how they themselves can take forward the framework to deliver One Planet Living in their own lives and areas of work with the launch of the One Planet Open Source online learning tool And finally a number of commitments will be made by the panelists and participants which are to be included in the Rio 20 Compendium of Commitments In summary the potential contributions of this side event to the outcomes of Rio 20 are to a Inspire participants with examples of sustainability in practice from business and civil society using the One Planet Living sustainable development framework and tool b Make this framework freely available for the wider use of civil society post Rio 20 c Inform government approaches to the expected outcomes of Rio 20 SDGs principles for the Green Economy and National Implementation Plans d Enable dialogue and collaboration between governments business and civil society e Finally commitments will be announced by civil society business and government participants towards the Rio 20 Compendium of Commitments Side Event Agenda Chair Raf Tuts Coordinator Coordinator Urban Planning and Design Branch UNHABITAT Welcome and introduction Opening address Paula Caballero Gomez Director General of Economic Social and Environmental Matters Ministry of Foreign Affairs Government of Colombia tbc Emphasising the importance of principles

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=537&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Connecting the dots: science, the IPCC and the policy picture
    climate change which provided the basis for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change UNFCCC and it continues to provide scientific and technical information to support the Convention The importance of IPCC assessments for the UNFCCC was highlighted in the Durban decisions and the IPCC s rigorous assessment process has become a template for science based assessments work Besides comprehensive assessment reports the IPCC produces special reports on emerging and other issues relevant for policy implementation and risk management at a country level An examination of two recent special reports will take two of the key themes of the Conference disaster risk reduction and energy as examples Detailed programme The side event will briefly recall what we know about anthropogenic climate change and how scientific understanding has evolved in the past 20 years It will also recall the role IPCC assessment reports which aim to be policy relevant but are never policy prescriptive have played over the past 24 years for the UNFCCC To ensure its assessment reports are both rigorously science based and transparent the IPCC has developed a writing and review process involving hundreds of authors from a wide range of disciplines and all regions a multi stage review and thousands of expert comments Being policy relevant requires also an active science policy dialogue IPCC encourages wide stakeholder input in the scoping process for IPCC reports and governments approve and accept of the completed reports Over the past two decades the scope of IPCC reports has broadened from focus on natural sciences to include the economic and social dimensions of Sustainable Development The IPCC assessment reports integrate various dimensions of natural sciences relevant for understanding climate change socio economic implications for human and natural systems and how to mitigate them In their breadth the reports cover the full range of priority areas and critical issues being discussed at Rio from agriculture and food security to oceans forest and biodiversity to energy transport and human settlements and human well being and security A simple example illustrates the power and relevance of this approach a given country may aim in energy policy to provide affordable energy resources while keeping pollution to a minimum Its industrial policy will reflect the need to consume low cost low polluting energy while seeking viable opportunities to generate affordable clean energy And its health policy will support the move to clean energy Sustainable development is only possible when social economic and environmental policies are mutually reinforcing in this way Given the focus of the Rio 20 Conference the findings of two relevant Special Reports completed in the year 2011 will be presented representing the knowledge base for implementing policy decisions in the energy sector and in disaster risk reduction Weather and climate related disasters have social as well as physical dimensions The Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation SREX addresses the interaction of climatic environmental and human factors that can lead to disasters It

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=247&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : On Right to Water, Green Economy and Right based approaches to Sustainable Development
    and species to water for life and well being is necessary to help guide new governance systems that encourage respectful use of water rather than a system that is based on commodification of nature to ensure the security of current and future generations of people and species Detailed programme Right to Water Green Economy or Right based approaches to sustainable development The planet is facing multiple environmental crises in climate food and biodiversity The water challenges are escalating in the form of diversions that dry up rivers and aquifers and continued polluting events that contaminate remaining fresh water sources These activities result in human communities without clean water for their basic needs and ecosystems and species that suffer destruction and extinction Globalized industrial agri food systems are a big part of the problem Existing treaties laws and policies are proving to be insufficient to stem the slow destruction of the water sources on which we depend to the detriment of people and planet An essential component of effective sustainable water governance is right to water specifically right to water to meet the basic needs of people and to help ensure ecosystem sustenance locally By contrast our environmental laws permit a race to the bottom system that legalizes pollution and over diversion Legal recognition of rights of people waterways and species to water for life and well being is necessary to help guide new governance systems that encourage respectful use of water rather than a system that is based on commodification of nature This is necessary for the security of current many of who are already vulnerable to multiple crises and future generations of people and species In addition social protection needs to become an essential component of any new proposals on sustainable development This panel will provide examine the green

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=618&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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