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  • Rio+20 : Green economy as an inducer of conservation in Brazilian Amazon
    Vale has supported several projects in the Brazilian Amazon who flock to this effect to value the forest as a great asset market of the future Working in network with recognized organizations acting in the Amazon and international projection these projects are developed in coordination in areas suffering strong anthropogenic pressure constantly threatened by illegal logging The event aims to show some experiments and their results developed in the states of Pará Mato Grosso and Amazonas Detailed programme The objective of this side event is to show that some projects developed in the Brazilian Amazon are already looking for solutions and achieving success towards a green economy and poverty eradication These initiatives seek to involve the least environmental impact valuation of standing forest and the improvement of quality of life of local populations From regional pilot experiences is possible to evaluate lessons learned and how much progress we still need to have a truly sustainable future The event will feature the following speakers and their projects Mariano Cenamo Idesam Seeding Apuí s Sustainability The project seeks a sustainable development model based on a forest based economy and low carbon for the city of Apui located in the southeastern state of Amazon state Brazil The strategy is based on providing an alternative source of income legal sustainable and long term benefits linked to social and environmental commitments to engage farmers interested in conducting the environmental regulation of their properties Manuel Amaral IEB Xingu Sustainable Environment The project seeks to foster a reflection on regional sustainability focusing on a pact between local actors agendas for reducing deforestation from the consolidation of sustainable economic alternatives experienced by farmers of Sao Felix do Xingu Eduardo Trevisan Imaflora Cocoa Production and Marketing with Social Responsibility The project seeks to improve income communities through added value

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=81&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Greening the Games: How Brazil's World Cup is Driving Economic Changes
    combined investment of more than US 114 billion across 12 Brazilian cities for the construction or renovation of 12 football stadiums plus transportation hotels and waste and water infrastructure to support millions of fans As the largest infrastructure project in the country s history preparations for the World Cup today will have long lasting impacts on Brazil s urban sectors Planning for the Cup has provided Brazil with an opportunity to achieve sustainable urban economic development that may not present itself again for decades or possibly centuries This event will hit on key themes of the green economy including green building low carbon transit socioeconomic impact green jobs sustainable financing mechanisms and voluntary commitments Background In 2010 Ernst Young partnered with the Getulio Vargas Foundation released a study Social and Economic Impacts of the 2014 World Cup which estimated that in total the World Cup would bring an additional R 142 39 billion into Brazil s national economy over the period of 2010 2014 generating approximately 3 63 million jobs per year and R 63 48 billion of income for the population which will have significant impacts on consumer spending and the broader economy as a whole The scale of economic activity associated with the Cup is undeniably the largest financial stimulus to ever reach the country Brazil not only has the responsibility to mitigate negative environmental and social impacts of World Cup development it also has the potential to chart a new pathway toward a sustainable urban landscape by leveraging this large scale investment Copa Verde an initiative launched by architects Ian McKee and Vicente Mello outlines a bold plan based on voluntary commitments for developers and policymakers to leave a green World Cup legacy focused on sustainable infrastructure Thanks to an integrated effort by stakeholders from the private

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=228&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Launch: Reflection Group Report on Global Development Perspectives
    Policy Forum lead organizer Social Watch Third World Network Development Alternative with Women for a New Era DAWN Friedrich Ebert Foundation terre des hommes Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation Introduction As a response to the multiple global crises the Reflection Group will launch a comprehensive report that highlights the need for fundamental changes in particular Changes in fiscal and regulatory policies at national and international levels in order to overcome social inequalities and the degradation of nature and to strengthen sustainable economies Changes in institutions and governance mechanisms at national and international levels Changes in the mindset the guiding concepts goals and indicators of development and societal progress At the side event prominent members of the Reflection Group will present key findings and policy recommendations of this report Detailed programme In November 2010 several civil society groups networks and foundations including Social Watch Third World Network DAWN the Friedrich Ebert Foundation Global Policy Forum terre des hommes and the Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation launched the CIVIL SOCIETY REFLECTION GROUP ON GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES The Group was established in response to the unprecedented coincidence of global crises the economic and financial crisis the food crisis as well as the intensifying climate crisis These unresolved crises reveal the failure of the dominant model of development and economic progress that is oriented on a technocratic modernization approach which is blind to environmental and human rights aspects confuses economic growth with progress in society and regards poverty as a primarily technical challenge in which categories of inequality and social justice are neglected The objective of the group was to draw lessons from these crises to look beyond conventional development concepts and goals and to fundamentally rethink the models and measures of development and social progress in North and South The group consists of 17 civil society activists

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=292&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Sustainable Development and Inter-generational Equity Issues Dialogue
    Rio 20 Calendar Logistics for Rio 20 Transportation Bus schedule Conference on sustainability Calendar Map Registration By Category Preparatory Committees Intersessionals Informal Consultations Regional Member States Major Groups Bureau United Nations IGOs Information Lead organizer International Youth and Student Movement for the United Nations ISMUN 11 30 13 00 Date 16 Jun 2012 Room T 10 Sustainable Development and Inter generational Equity Issues Dialogue Organizing partners US Human Rights Network African Youth Network for Sustainable Development Third World Network5 North South XXI Caribbean Youth Environment Network UN Student and Youth Association Malta CODEJU Chile UN Student and Youth Association of Togo Liberian Youth and Students Movement for the UN and ISMUN Congo Brazaville Introduction The dialogue will be of Panel Discussion and Workshop nature on making a link between Climate Justice Carbon Debt Development and Reparations Detailed programme The dialogue will examine questions of equity and justice across generations vis à vis youth and sustainable development issue emphasize decolonizing global governance and meeting development challenges through south south cooperation reparations for past injustices which legacies are at the core of the present day world north south solidarity and more democratic international institutions promote a process for international NGO campaigning on

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=482&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020
    programme Biological diversity underpins ecosystem functioning and the provision of ecosystem services essential for human well being It provides for food security human health the provision of clean air and water it contributes to local livelihoods and economic development and is essential for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals including poverty reduction Accordingly the goals of the Rio 20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development to promote a green economy for sustainable development and poverty eradication and enhance the institutional framework for sustainable development can be realized by taking into account the contribution of biodiversity and ecosystem services In 2010 governments adopted a ten year strategic plan to halt the loss of biodiversity The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011 2020 and the Aichi biodiversity targets were adopted by governments at the tenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biodiversity Subsequently the plan was adopted as the guidance for the United Nations system as a whole The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011 2020 and the Aichi biodiversity targets provide a compelling vision and enabling framework for the realization of sustainable production and consumption in a participatory and inclusive manner and in that regard will support food security sustainable water management and the foundations for a green economy for sustainable development and poverty eradication Mainstreaming the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011 2020 and the Aichi biodiversity targets will allow for multiple sectors to refocus on sustainability through increasing awareness of threats and opportunities and enhancing the understanding of links between biodiversity and ecosystem services for the benefit of green gross domestic product The successful implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity requires new and innovative approaches to link biodiversity conservation and sustainable use to development as well as the removal of perverse incentives The development and

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=498&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Feeding the World: Sustainable Agriculture & Innovation
    range of approaches for boosting agricultural production while reducing negative environmental impacts on agriculture will be critical However despite the 2008 food crisis and environmental changes public investments in agricultural research and extension are low In the context of the ongoing debate as to which potential farming methods and technologies offer the greatest promise for investment and scale up this panel will examine the contribution of sustainable agriculture sustainable intensification to agricultural productivity and resilience in the near and long term and how this contribution can be estimated and tracked Detailed programme By 2050 the world s population will have reached 9 billion The challenges to feed this growing population are unprecedented requiring more than a second green revolution With climate change global yields in 2050 could decrease by 20 30 percent if we cannot bring good agricultural practices new technologies farming methods and supporting institutions to the world s farmers Sustainable intensification refers to a range of approaches for boosting agricultural production while reducing negative environmental impacts on agriculture These will be critical as pressures rise on soil water and biodiversity However despite the 2008 food crisis and environmental changes public investments in agricultural research and extension are still among the lowest in decades There is also the challenge of meeting the needs of a diverse range of farming systems and farmers around the world including risk management asset building and profitability In the context of the ongoing debate as to which potential farming methods and technologies offer the greatest promise for investment and scale up this panel will examine the contribution of sustainable agriculture sustainable intensification to agricultural productivity and resilience in the near and long term and how this contribution can be estimated and tracked Setting the stage is a presentation from IFPRI that highlights the global

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=509&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Re-greening for Resilient Landscapes
    Landcare East Africa Groundswell Government of Namibia Introduction Thematic focus Land Water Biodiversity Livestock and Livelihoods The drylands are the best chance we have to achieve multiple goals at a scale that has significant and durable impact Globally the drylands support 2 1 billion people with the majority still dependent upon the success of extensive grazing systems and sustainable crop production intensification Yet drylands have been considered marginal subject to degradation loss of biodiversity and ineffective water management while the people they support have been marginalized Targeting drylands is key in the march towards sustainable development because of the strong connection between land degradation and desertification and other global issues including climate change droughts and floods famine poverty and social disruption Detailed programme Thematic focus Land Water Biodiversity Livestock and Livelihoods The drylands are the best chance we have to achieve multiple goals at a scale that has significant and durable impact Globally the drylands support 2 1 billion people with the majority still dependent upon the success of extensive grazing systems and sustainable crop production intensification Yet drylands have been considered marginal subject to degradation loss of biodiversity and ineffective water management while the people they support have been marginalized Targeting drylands is key in the march towards sustainable development because of the strong connection between land degradation and desertification and other global issues including climate change droughts and floods famine poverty and social disruption These landscapes and their farmer and pastoralist stewards hold huge potential for contributing to local and global solutions by not only improving land health but also reducing food water and energy insecurity avoiding and reversing desertification stemming the loss of biodiversity mitigating the impacts of climate change and strategically addressing cycles of droughts and floods Livestock and trees are critical factors for success While

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=525&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : The Human right to water and sanitation: The challenge of implementation
    s ability to regulate The privatization model can be influenced by many contextual factors and these need to be accounted for in studies There was consensus that the case studies should also look at good models of working private systems in order to analyze factors leading to success and to see what kind of lessons could be transferred Participants also expressed interest in meta analyses of existing case studies or to find ways to take the analysis further X Research and Thinking on the Human Rights Component Some participants questioned the usefulness of discussing a human right to water Who has the enforcement responsibility What are the obligations of such a right How will the international human rights framework work with water issues Is it better to think of water as a legal right or as a policy issue X Incorporating the Grassroots Perspective There was concern that some of the larger theoretical issues are sometimes beside the point for those on the ground What is the role of impacted communities How much can and should be focused on the local grassroots level How are ways to mobilize people to make demands It was also noted that the majority of people without access to safe water are in developing countries and in rural areas Privatization may not be the most important issue for this group However it is easier and cheaper to address the access issues in urban areas How should this be addressed in future research and advocacy X Population and Over consumption It was expressed that when thinking about advocacy education and research plans it is important to talk more about the links between water issues and population growth It is a problem that figures and studies about water issues do not take into account population projections Also

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=95&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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