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  • Rio+20 : Sustainability Revisited: Population, Reproductive Health & the Planet
    the Aspen Institute s Global Leaders Council for Reproductive Health GLC will convene a high level moderated dialogue to raise the profile of human development gender and reproductive health within the Rio 20 UN Conference on Sustainable Development Members of the GLC and other high level leaders will speak to the role of human development and reproductive health in the new and emerging global discussion of sustainable development Featured speakers will include Gro Harlem Brundtland Former Prime Minister of Norway Musimbi Kanyoro President and Chief Executive Officer of the Global Fund for Women Tewodros Melesse Director General of the International Planned Parenthood Federation Mary Robinson Former President of Ireland and President of the Mary Robinson Foundation Climate Justice Tim Wirth President of the United Nations Foundation Detailed programme The Aspen Institute s Global Leaders Council for Reproductive Health GLC is a group of 16 sitting and former heads of state high level policymakers and other leaders committed to advancing reproductive health for lasting development and prosperity Chaired by Mary Robinson Council Members work to mobilize the political will and financial resources necessary to achieve universal access to reproductive health by 2015 a key target of the UN Millennium Development Goals In 1987 the Brundtland Commission outlined a new vision for sustainable development and named human development as one of its three pillars alongside economic growth and environmental sustainability In the years since the human development pillar has received the least traction within the sustainable development agenda In many circles today sustainable development means green technology environmental protection and natural resources conservation with little mention of human development Only by ensuring that all people have access to health care education economic opportunities and other basic rights can we ensure that development occurs in a sustainable way In the field of reproductive

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=463&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Dublin Rio Principles, where do we stand, what lessons learned
    s implementation of the AMCOW gender strategy and to develop an Africa network that will support AMCOW and bring these issues forward beyond RIO 20 Detailed programme THEMATIC FOCUS Gender equality and women s empowerment goals are part of the cornerstones of the Dublin Principles the UN Conference on Environment and Development 1992 the 2000 Millennium Development Summit and the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development WSSD Evidence suggests that considerable progress has been made in achieving these goals and that there are also significant gaps These gaps are between the pivotal roles that women play in the provision management and safeguarding of water and how these roles are reflected in policy and institutional arrangements for the development and management of water resources There is often inter alia lack of awareness on how to mainstream gender and also limited lack of understanding and clarity about the relevance of gender to WRM planning practices There is often lack of institutional capacity and expertise on gender and WRM weak coordination harmonization and networking among actors in mainstreaming gender at the regional and national levels inadequate resources human and financial also slow down the pace of implementation The lack of gender sensitivity in the development of core indicators and targets in WRM are well entrenched barriers National and water sector budgetary allocations are lacking to support targeted gender activities at all levels and the linkages between gender and the various key policy documents on WRM is limited or non existent Bridging the gender gap will require acceptance and implementation of Principle 3 of the Dublin Principles in terms of promoting positive policies strategies and actions that seek to address women s needs equips and empowers them to participate at all levels of water resources management in ways defined by them Women s empowerment is important because it contributes to improved water resources management Regional and national level solutions therefore will require the development of water sector plans that are aligned with the existing gender policy frameworks to ensure that the different activities that are implemented in the water sector appropriately mainstream gender concerns This event aims to facilitate information exchange on gender strategies actions and lessons learnt on gender mainstreaming in water resources management throughout the world THEMES SPEAKERS Moderator AMCOW president Theme 1 The AMCOW Gender Strategy priority areas for implementation new ideas and concrete partnerships and resources for implementation Hon Maria Mutagamba Minister of Water and Environment Uganda Theme 2 Lessons from the Swedish Government s experience in implementing gender in water resources management Gunilla Carlsson Minister for International Development Cooperation Ministry for Foreign Affairs Sweden TBC Theme 3 The GWP Gender Strategy Ideas that have come through consultative process involving the GWP Gender Reference Group and the GWP Network Ania Grobicki Executive Secretary GWP Mercy Dikito Wachtmeister Senior Officer Global Initiatives GWP Theme 4 Exploring the nexus between gender equality growth and sustainable development policy options and lessons from UNDP Winnie Byanyima Director of UNDP Gender Team Bureau for Development

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=584&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Securing Food, Water and Energy in the World's Most Valued Ecoregions
    integrated strategies and regional cooperation initiatives This event will provide a forum for governments on the cutting edge of green economy innovations to profile integrated and collaborative approaches that enhance freshwater forest agricultural and marine resources the vital building blocks of a sustainable future Detailed programme Potential Contribution to the outcome of UNSCD Rio 20 Sustainable development is a holistic approach centered on integration and balanced consideration of social economic and environmental goals and objectives at all levels of both public and private decision making It also emphasizes intra and inter generational equity This event will highlight and explore through a south south dialogue the benefits and complexities of taking a holistic integrated and inclusive approach to addressing the intersection between economies and the environment in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication Thematic Focus Integrated approaches to developing green economies in critical ecosystems Global economic and social development depends on the continued productivity of inter connected ecological systems Intact healthy and diverse natural ecosystems provide water energy food and livelihoods to human populations especially the rural poor who continue to rely on direct access to natural resources These inter connected ecosystems also provide resilience against the increasingly evident and powerful impacts of climate change The regional development banks and WWF are working with partners in nations developing ground breaking initiatives to safeguard national regional and globally strategic natural assets the essential building blocks of current and future economies These collaborative initiatives highlight the importance of developing partnerships and integrated approaches to building the green economies of tomorrow while addressing the complex challenges of today They demonstrate the kind of leadership and commitment to action on the ground that will inspire others around the world seeking effective pathways toward sustainable development Format and Speakers Opening Remarks Enhancing natural capital and improving human welfare why do ecosystems matter for sustainable development Speaker Yolanda Kakabadse President WWF International Case 1 State of the Art Water Resource and Environmental Management in Mexico Speaker Ing José Luis Luege Tamargo Director General CONAGUA Mexico Mexico s National Water Commission CONAGUA the Inter America Development Bank and WWF have established a water reserves initiative in Mexico for environmental security It is designed to maintain ecosystem functions across the nation that will safeguard adequate reserves for future development Establishing a water sources protection framework based on a water reserves strategy is a key action in the implementation of Mexico s long term sustainable and adaptive water policy vision recently launched in their Water Agenda 2030 Case 2 Regional Cooperation towards a Poverty free and Ecologically Rich Greater Mekong Subregion Speaker Vice Minister Bui Cach Tuyen Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Vietnam The Greater Mekong Subregion GMS Economic Development Program was recently renewed at a regional Leaders Summit of the six nations of the Mekong River basin Cambodia the People s Republic of China Lao PDR Myanmar Thailand and Viet Nam This comprehensive and integrated strategic framework lays the foundation for a green economy across the

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=342&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Healthy Women, Healthy Planet: Women's Empowerment, Reproductive Healt
    place outside RioCentro in the Barra Arena Healthy Women Healthy Planet Women s Empowerment Reproductive Healt Organizing partners Population Action International Population and Climate Change Alliance Management Systems for Health Introduction Women are instrumental in determining a family s ability to survive and effectively cope with the impacts of climate change Access to reproductive health and family planning is an important part of strengthening women s capacity as leaders in sustainable development yet in too many places around the world women s access to these services is limited Reducing unintended pregnancies and giving families the tools to determine family size can improve socio economic status of women reduce strain on the environment and improve conservation of resources all of which make significant contributions to sustainable development and resilience in the face of a changing climate Detailed programme Why this side event Agenda 21 affirms the importance of women s empowerment and reproductive health including family planning as among programs that promote sustainable development Rio 20 provides an important opportunity to reaffirm the importance of the issues especially in the face of global climate change Expected Outcome It is expected that the discussions will help inform post Rio 20 frameworks such as Post MDGs 2015 and Sustainable Development Goals and ensure that women s empowerment and reproductive health issues are recognized as part of global efforts towards green economy poverty eradication and sustainable development Objectives This event will bring together leaders from the environment gender and international development communities for a discussion of the ways in which reproductive health gender climate change and sustainable development are linked Participants will share perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in linking these issues in a growing world population of 7 billion and identify strategies for productive dialogue The event will provide opportunities for networking

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=469&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Incorporating Biodiversity into Business - cases in Brazil
    term plans for the development of the territories where they are located or influential These projects include the design of sustainable development plans for the territories but also the creation and implementation of financial mechanisms to support these plans as well as participative governance models to get local communities government authorities and other partners involved Three companies will present their experiences in a systematized way allowing the audience to evaluate the convergences and specific aspects of the three cases Detailed programme Funbio seeks to show some examples of companies in Brazil that are investing in strategies that consider biodiversity conservation climate change and social economic development as key elements of their decision making processes More than reducing the impacts on the territories where these companies operate such long term initiatives aim at creating a favorable context to new businesses This aspect is directly related to the Green Economy debate as the private sector acts as an anchor player in the territory to foster new business models that generate income and reduce poverty The three selected examples have some key elements in common such as the integration of the community into the companies value chain the reduction of environmental impact and the fostering of sustainable production The cases to be presented are 1 Alcoa has a bauxite mine in the Brazilian Amazon in a small municipality named Juruti The company partnered with Funbio and other institutions to create a sustainable development plan for Juruti including a fund to finance community based projects on sustainable production and a participative governance model 2 Natura Cosmetics company uses biodiversity assets in its production especially from the Amazon region All communication efforts from the company are anchored in the use of natural and biodiverse elements in its products The company decided to invest in the

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=492&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Promoting a Green Economy in Africa, LDCs, SIDS and LLDCS/Challenges/O
    Informal Consultations Regional Member States Major Groups Bureau United Nations IGOs Information Lead organizer Office of the Special Adviser on Africa OSAA 13 30 15 00 Date 18 Jun 2012 Room T 3 Promoting a Green Economy in Africa LDCs SIDS and LLDCS Challenges O Organizing partners Full title of the Event Promoting a Green Economy in Africa LDCs SIDS and LLDCS Challenges and Opportunities Lead Organizer United Nations Office of the Special Adviser on Africa UN OSAA Sponsoring partners collaborators AU NEPAD Agency UNEP UNECA AfDB OHRLLS DPI Tanzania Introduction Promotion of the green economy is one major means by which the current economy in Africa can make the transition to sustainable economic development As has been widely acknowledged although Africa has contributed least to global climate change it has suffered disproportionately from its adverse effects The challenges of adaptation and mitigation are therefore particularly urgent for Africa The continent has 60 percent of the world s arable land 20 percent of its forest reserves 20 percent of the global land mass 40 percent of the world s biodiversity and more than half of the world s clean energy potential A new paradigm is needed to ensure that countries maximize the potential benefits that the green economy could provide A green economy with the vast untapped natural resources represent a paradigm shift in promoting clean and renewable energy creation of employment and conservation of the continent s natural resources Detailed programme Thematic focus Green Economy as a way to achieve sustainable development poverty eradication and the creation of decent jobs by increasing resource efficiency supporting the shift to sustainable consumption and production patterns and facilitating low carbon development Speakers Potential Moderator Chair Panelists Resource persons this information can be provided as it becomes available Potential contribution to the outcome

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=28&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Disarmament for Development
    WFC Introduction As the economic crisis continues to give rise to government spending cuts in many countries increased attention is being paid to military budgets The global military expenditure in 2010 has reached a historic high of 1630 billion This is 5 times more than what we would need to achieve the Millennium Development Goals This side event will show the effects of armed conflicts and weapons on development and explain an innovative way to finance programmes for sustainable development by reducing military spending Detailed programme Militarism is probably the world s largest barrier to ending poverty Whether it be armies and weapons of war or small arms flowing into our neighborhoods and local communities militarism destroys communities wastes resources and prevents sustainable development Military and weapons spending consumes resources that could be applied instead to human needs The flow of arms into a conflict region destroys democratic and traditional control structures for land use production and the economy and replaces this with gang leaders and militias Armed conflicts push people out of their houses off their lands and into slavery or refugee camps The use of weapons kills or maims people talking them out of the workforce and adding an additional economic burden of medical care for the wounded Weapons testing and use also destroys the environment whether it be the devastation from nuclear weapons testing the farmlands no longer useable because of landmines or cluster munitions the toxins released from explosions in war or other weaponry like depleted uranium weapons And the use of military vehicles aircraft ships rockets tanks armoured vehicles in exercises and military operations constitutes possibly the largest single global contributor to carbon emissions and climate change Addressing militarism is the best hope we have of achieving the UN MDGs of ending poverty achieving universal

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=78&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : LP Gas: An exceptional energy for improving health and development
    is modern and safe and can be used anywhere It is also available immediately without large investments in R D technology time or infrastructure It is portable and can be transported stored and used virtually anywhere without large investments in infrastructure making it ideal for solving development issues and improving the life and health of millions of people who currently lack access to modern forms of energy Detailed programme Energy brings life to the world Every person on this planet wherever they live depends every day on energy to feed and nurture their families to provide heat and light and to transport goods and people to their destinations But generating energy can also create pollution which can be very harmful to human health Fortunately some fuels burn much more cleanly and have greatly reduced potential to affect human health Liquefied Petroleum Gas LP Gas or LPG is one of these fuels The World Health Organisation in a report which evaluates strategies to avoid the devastating health consequences of exposure to wood fire cooking in poorer countries had this to say about the value of switching to LP Gas investing US 13 billion per year to halve by 2015 the number of people worldwide cooking with solid fuels by supplying them with liquefied petroleum gas shows a payback of US 91 billion per year WHO 2006 This side event will highlight the findings of an independent study that examines the role of LP Gas in reducing negative health impacts stemming from the use of traditional fuels and biomass for cooking in the developing world as well as in solving the problem of access to a clean modern energy that is necessary for sustainable development to occur LP Gas is a clean burning and efficient fuel and a vital source of energy

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=97&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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