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  • Rio+20 : Achieving sustainability through low carbon development ? The Guyana story
    Committees Intersessionals Informal Consultations Regional Member States Major Groups Bureau United Nations IGOs Information Lead organizer Guyana 11 00 12 30 Date 20 Jun 2012 Room P3 E Achieving sustainability through low carbon development The Guyana story Organizing partners Government of Guyana Introduction Guyana proposes to convene a Side Event to showcase its initiatives towards sustainable development with focus on Guyana s Low Carbon Development Strategy LCDS and the execution of its Interim REDD Partnership with Norway Detailed programme Theme Achieving sustainability through low carbon development The Guyana story Guyana proposes to convene a Side Event to showcase its initiatives towards sustainable development with focus on Guyana s Low Carbon Development Strategy LCDS and the execution of its Interim REDD Partnership with Norway This partnership is the second biggest Interim REDD agreement in the world and was deliberately designed by the two Governments to provide the world with a scaleable replicable model The Side Event will showcase Guyana s steps towards conceptualizing the Strategy the national stakeholder engagement process the mechanisms for measuring performance based payments and work done on MRV System the innovative financing model and the arrangements to ensure internationally acceptable fiduciary social and environmental safeguards and the

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=50&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Tourism for a Sustainable Future
    Tourism Organization UNWTO and the Ministry of Tourism Brazil in cooperation with the UN Steering Committee on Tourism for Development SCTD SCTD partners UNWTO together with ILO ITC UNDP UNEP UNESCO UNIDO UNCTD and WTO Introduction In the face of global challenges tourism has become a key instrument for eradicating poverty responding to climate change environmental sustainability and contributing to the Millennium Development Goals MDGs Furthermore the tourism sector has been identified within the Green Economy Initiative of the United Nations UN as one of the ten sectors which can lead in the transformation to the new social economic and environmental model while still addressing development challenges in all economies and nations toward a more sustainable path with improved benefits and opportunities for humanity s future while preserving its natural environment Tourism for sustainable development can be the future but clearly requires effective coherent and coordinated government policies and actions including in other sectors Detailed programme This event organised by UNWTO and the Ministry of Tourism of Brazil in cooperation with the Steering Committee on Tourism for Development SCTD will provide an opportunity for senior officials from select member countries including academia donor and development institutions to deliberate on the critical role that tourism can play in global development while addressing the poverty gap Panellists will discuss the state of tourism the main challenges it faces and the direction it should be heading in order grow sustainably and to contribute effectively to global development imperatives The discussions will look at how tourism while inter linked to the seven 7 critical issues to be reviewed at the Rio 20 Conference jobs energy cities food water oceans and disasters can be an instrument to drive positive change both for developing and developed countries and should be mainstreamed in the global development agenda

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=108&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Building Marine Ecosystem Resilience to Ocean Acidification
    in the Small Island Developing States Detailed programme The problem of ocean acidification is frequently marginalized in policy debates about the need to reduce the carbon dioxide CO2 emissions responsible for climate change yet it is potentially one of the most calamitous consequences of the pollution affecting all three pillars of sustainable development This side event will bring together government leaders as well as representatives from civil society academia the media and other interested stakeholders to discuss the threats posed by ocean acidification and its relationship to other challenges such as overfishing coral bleaching and pollution Potential for legal policy and financial solutions will also be examined with special attention given to marine protection success stories The conversation will focus on successful efforts to build marine ecosystem resilience in Small Island Developing States Ocean acidification poses an ominous environmental danger to the health of oceans and at least a billion people around the world who depend on it for their food and livelihoods both in social and economic terms Scientists have already traced a decline in coral reefs in tropical regions as well as pteropods which form the foundation of the marine food web to the effects of acidification a trend that could have grave consequences for numerous other fish species An increasing body of evidence shows that limiting pollution overfishing and other stresses can help build resilience to ocean acidification in sensitive species and habitats With CO2 emissions certain to keep rising and pollution already in the atmosphere projected to intensify ocean acidification it is clear steps must immediately be taken to increase the resilience of vulnerable species and ecosystems alongside the long term imperative to reduce CO2 emissions at their source The side event will present insight into the science social economic and environmental impacts policy options and

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=258&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : The Urban Games: A Competition to Promote Green Cities
    support the formulation and implementation of sustainable urban policies programs and projects Detailed programme If urban areas in the developing world continue to grow unsustainably their environmental impact could be catastrophic Cities occupy only 2 of the world s land but consume 75 of the planet s resources and generate a similar percentage of waste including air pollution solid waste and toxic effluents Activities within cities as well as activities in rural areas to service cities generate about 75 of economic product and produce nearly 80 of greenhouse gases GHGs Urban expansion and the associated destruction of forests and vegetation also have a strong effect on the climate Future cities will have to be significantly more environmentally friendly if they are to become more sustainable Cities can and should become better places for everyone to live with more green spaces and less air and water pollution The global environment must also be protected by encouraging lower emissions of GHGs Green cities are those in which actions are taken to improve the environment in a deliberate and comprehensive way with significant impacts felt not only within city boundaries but also on a regional and even global scale Achieving this vision will require maintaining economic growth and improving living standards while addressing environmental sustainability climate change and environmental damage resulting from urban production consumption and waste generation This side event will highlight the importance of green cities by featuring mayors and governors from around the world who are taking action to make their cities more environmentally sustainable Through a competition dubbed the Urban Games the contestants will engage in a friendly competition and discussion to raise the awareness of participating persons and organizations on the important role of green cities in realizing a green economy the type of urban investments required to make urban development more environmentally sustainable and various measures that cities must take to become greener including options for financing different types of investments The Games will be broken up into three sections with each section featuring a number of questions provided by the Host that will provoke a discussion among the contestants Part 1 Cities and the Green Economy This part will stress the important role of cities in determining the economic social and environmental sustainability of a country and region and even on a global level It will further stress the opportunities that exist for cities to take a lead role in greening of economies as incubators of innovation While stressing that there is no one size fits all model this part will also provide an overview of some common issues e g spatial structure transport housing urban services and technological changes that must be taken into account in developing green cities Part 2 Green City Investments This part will introduce six key elements of green city investments as follows Low Carbon Transport providing efficient public transport encouraging zero emission vehicles and bicycles and limiting the use of private cars in city centers Infrastructure for Green Industry making

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=322&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Partnerships for Education in the Green Economy
    and to build a platform and network to expand the delivery of effective cross sectoral education partnerships after Rio 20 Detailed programme Partnerships for Education Building the foundations of a green prosperous and equitable global economy With support from UNESCO the World Bank and BG Group the International Business Leaders Forum will present new research on Partnerships for Education The session will be chaired by Dr Marcelo de Andrade of the Institute for Sustainable Development with Caio Koch Weser Vice Chairman Deutsche Bank Group giving a keynote address A panel of expert speakers will discuss the key issues related to education partnerships Ramanie Kunanayagam BG Group UK Wanda Engel Unibanco Brazil Sudhir K Sinha ArcelorMittal India Jorge Sequeira UNESCO Chile Education has a central role to play in realising the vision of a sustainable future that will be shared at the Rio 20 Summit The objectives of the event are to raise awareness of the opportunities and key success factors for effective education partnerships and to build a platform and network to expand the delivery of effective cross sectoral education partnerships after Rio 20 If we are to achieve the future we want we have to find ways to give everyone access to the knowledge skills behaviours and values needed to create a just and equitable global society within the limits of our planet s resources This education and skills training needs to be accessible and affordable for all sectors of society and for all countries if the drive towards and participation in a green economy is to be shared across the globe Worsening resource stress and pollution together with growing populations mean that the need to roll out such an education framework is urgent and growing To reach these goals within the timeframe required will necessitate a huge scaling up of effort which can only be achieved through a concerted approach involving the private sector alongside governments and development partners To ensure the quality accountability and equity of this provision these cross sectoral partnerships will need to be founded and run within tried and tested frameworks which can be monitored and evaluated The key themes of the session are 1 The vital role of universally accessible quality education and skills training for many of the areas critical to a sustainable future and for the provision of green jobs 2 The role of cross sectoral partnerships in expanding access to quality education with a particular focus on the role of the private sector in partnerships with government and NGOs 3 How such partnerships can be set up and evaluated in order to ensure accountability accessibility equity and quality 1 Access to quality education is recognised in The Future We Want as an essential condition for sustainable development and social inclusion The side event and supporting research will provide evidence and case studies to demonstrate the role of quality education in achieving poverty reduction reduction of inequalities and the shift to a green economy 2 Cross sectoral partnerships provide a significant

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=335&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Water and Sanitation: Rights for Sustainable Development
    is essential for the full enjoyment of all human rights Spain has played a leading role in the international recognition of the human right to water and sanitation The objective of the side event is to contribute to the Río 20 process by promoting debate and exchange of ideas among different stakeholders and partners on the challenge of implementing the human right to water and sanitation and including it in post 2015 development agenda Detailed programme Guaranteeing universal access to water and sanitation and sustainable management of water resources is an essential component of the fight against poverty and a priority for the Spanish Cooperation In this context Spain has played a leading role in the promotion of the international recognition of the human right to water and sanitation and has created the Cooperation Fund for Water and Sanitation FCAS in Latin America The Fund supports water and sanitation programs and projects in partner countries of Latin America giving priority to the poorest and most vulnerable populations in the region This fund which began operations in 2008 has already disbursed more than 800 million As it is stated in paragraph 69 of the Draft Declaration of Rio 20 the exchange of experiences on water resources management should be encouraged This event aims to contribute to this outcome by presenting and discussing the experience of the Spanish Cooperation in this regard In this sense the objectives of the side event are To reaffirm the commitment to the 2005 2015 International Decade for Action Water for Life To encourage the exchange of positive experiences and cooperation initiatives for water resource management To promote debate and exchange of ideas among different stakeholders partners and beneficiaries of the Spanish Cooperation on the challenge of implementing the human right to water and sanitation To raise

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=351&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Renewing Africa's Energy Future
    Rio 20 Guidelines for organizers Pictures Videos SD Learning Partnership Forum SD Dialogue Days Other events at Rio 20 Calendar Logistics for Rio 20 Transportation Bus schedule Conference on sustainability Calendar Map Registration By Category Preparatory Committees Intersessionals Informal Consultations Regional Member States Major Groups Bureau United Nations IGOs Information Lead organizer International Renewable Energy Agency IRENA 11 00 12 30 Date 20 Jun 2012 Room T 2 Documents 1540620

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=378&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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  • Rio+20 : Beyond GDP: Measuring the Future We Want
    opinion leaders Detailed programme The Rio Principles adopted at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro emphasized that human beings should be at the centre of concerns for sustainable development They are entitled to a healthy and productive life in harmony with nature Principle 1 This principle is central to UNDP s concept of human development which defines a process of enlarging people s choices emphasizing the freedom to be healthy to be educated and to enjoy a decent standard of living as well as a much broader range of capabilities to enable them to lead lives they have reason to value UNDP s first Human Development Report in 1990 recognized the limitations of existing development metrics and introduced the HDI as an alternative to GDP and related income based barometers of national progress it captures the key elements of human development notably education longevity and a decent standard of living The need for better approaches to measuring progress beyond short term economic indicators has been echoed more recently by other international institutions and opinion leaders including the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development s Better Life Initiative UN Secretary General s High level Global Sustainability Panel cited above and earlier the Stiglitz Sen Fitoussi Commission which concluded in 2009 that a broader range of welfare indicators should be used alongside GDP National initiatives to go beyond GDP are also growing notably by the Kingdom of Bhutan and the United Kingdom Further the UN Statistical Office s new System of Environmental Economic Accounting the Ecological Footprint and the World Bank led partnership for Wealth Accounting for Valuation of Ecosystem Services are among the global initiatives that explicitly seek to incorporate an environmental dimension into their measurement of economic progress The HDI is seen by many observers as the most widely accepted alternative to per capita GDP as a measure of development progress Yet as the UN Secretary General noted in his message to the Global Human Development Forum held in Istanbul in March 2012 The concept of human development originated in well rounded dissatisfaction with using only gross domestic product as a measure of human progress Though this understanding has become something of a benchmark in our thinking about development there remains a need to dramatically change the way we value and measure progress In this world of increasingly constrained resources what do societies need to know in order to operate their economies safely in the 21st century What critical information do they need to better understand the health of their economies and societies As with any measurement there are methodological and real world data challenges with the HDI family of indices Indeed these were noted by its creators more than two decades ago and have been partly addressed by new complementary measures adjusting the HDI to reflect the impact of gender bias other forms of social inequality and the incidence of poverty and deprivation The time has now come to go further by adjusting the measurement and conceptualization

    Original URL path: http://www.uncsd2012.org/index.php?page=view&type=1000&nr=544&menu=126 (2016-02-15)
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