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    good thing When conflict is avoided or mishandled it leads to a negative impact on relationships When it is engaged and worked through conflict actually adds depth and character to relationships It makes our relationships stronger I ve been learning that especially these past five years and this was another opportunity to grow as a person and model positive conflict resolution for my son 3 The opportunity for my son to extend forgiveness I won t be the only one who does something wrong to my son in his life I also won t be the only one who wants to be forgiven I want to be a person who can forgive others and I want that for my kids too My failure gave my son the opportunity to practice forgiving I hope this leads to an ability to forgive others as well even those who don t particularly care to be forgiven 4 The opportunity to be forgiven I would rather extend forgiveness to someone than receive it myself I have an especially hard time forgiving myself when I mess up with my kids my wife or others I love But I need to be able to receive forgiveness from others It is an important part of deep relationships and is a core component of my faith 5 The opportunity to see the strength of our relationship Later that Saturday we had some good times together As our family was riding in the car I was struck by the beauty of relationships that can withstand meltdowns and failures Our relationship is no worse off because of his meltdown or my failure in response If anything it s probably better I was overwhelmed by the beauty of this and it made me long to continue becoming the kind of parent husband and friend who can fail and be failed by others Trevor Lee is the lead pastor at Trailhead Church Centennial Colo Leave a comment Comment Name E mail Post 0 Comments Redemptive parenting failures Sunday Jun 1 2014 Five things your kids can learn when you fail by Trevor Lee Saturday was a bad day Well actually about 30 minutes was bad The brief spurt between the end of my son s basketball game and our departure for family pictures was unadulterated chaos The majority of the disaster revolved around two things my son s meltdown and my reaction In the course of half an hour I acted in ways I never want to behave as a father being impatient threatening punishment and yelling While I hate that I reacted in those ways I do think there are some redemptive things that can come out of such parenting failures 1 The opportunity to model responsibility When I fail as a dad in one respect or another I have the opportunity to take responsibility for my actions I could have given my son all the reasons I didn t react the way I should have I could have pushed the

    Original URL path: http://www.usmb.org/news/article/Redemptive-parenting-failures.html (2016-02-17)
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    perceived hierarchy or condescension and to see individuals for who they are It is to risk observing their sadness loneliness or anger and in a small way to bear it upon oneself Ultimately Peter offers love instead of money Silver or gold I do not have but what I have I give you In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth walk In order to move towards caritas we must first lay aside easy and reflexive solutions and look into the eyes of the poor In doing so we come to realize that poverty is more than a lack of things food skills knowledge but a psychological and spiritual phenomenon that demands transformation at a deeper level In Walking with the Poor his seminal work on transformational development Bryant Myers suggests The greatest point of transformational leverage is transformed people In other words the outcomes we desire to see in health education peace or social justice will be unrealized no matter how carefully we evaluate the needs or how skillfully we engineer the solutions Myers continues The fulcrum for transformational change is no longer transferring resources or building capacity or increasing choices as important as these things are But these things count only if they take place in a way that allows the poor to recover their true identity and discover the vocation God intends for them Is it possible to lay aside our penchant for problem solving Can we turn our attention from the needs of the poor so that instead of having to extend their trembling hands as Freire remarks they might extend them less and less in supplication so that more and more they become human hands which work and working transform the world Instead of asking What do you need we must look into the eyes of the poor and ask What do you have Inherent to this question is the belief that God has uniquely created and qualified each person and acting upon that recognition is the beginning of transformational development In 2 Kings 4 a woman laments to Elisha that her husband has died and she is about to lose her children as indentured slaves Elisha responds to her need by asking What do you have in your house She replies Nothing overlooking for the moment a small jar of olive oil tucked away in her cupboard When she recognizes this important asset and faithfully offers it to God it becomes the source of transformation both in the life of her family and the wider community What do you have represents a seismic shift in development thinking In my experience it is so counterintuitive that the initial response of the poor is often bewildered silence since they are accustomed to working with sympathetic benefactors and problem solvers It is not however a quick fix methodology but an attitude by which we must relate with the poor and evaluate the merit of our poverty interventions It is a question that negates the self importance of the giver while affirming the significance of the poor as valued citizens and agents of change Unlike charity as we know it it is an attitude that is rooted in love reflecting the true generosity of caritas Jamie Munday is the community development coordinator at MB Mission whereby he trains collaborates learns writes listens and grows alongside a global team of holistic practitioners He and his wife Leah have two young boys Leave a comment Comment Name E mail Post 0 Comments The cost of charity Sunday Jun 1 2014 Why helping someone in need can harm the giver and the receiver By Jamie Munday Positioned carefully in the vacillating shadow of a large palm tree the three of us exchanged stories as we sought relief from the oppressive afternoon sun As we began to walk back into the classroom the young Congolese student lowered his head slightly cupped his hands together and submissively requested a few dollars to provide a meal for his children Murray Nickel my associate reacted with indignation Why would you do that he queried the student You and I are colleagues At the time I felt Murray s response was harsh if not uncharitable Over time I ve come to realize that it was indeed uncharitable and therein lays its significance Murray who is a medical doctor and I had come to Kinshasa along with other Canadian doctors to host a training conference for Congolese medical students Murray was well aware that a couple dollars would have no lasting impact on this young man s family Much worse he knew it had the potential to transform the power dynamics of their relationship and slowly eat away at the dignity and self respect of the young man Taken in isolation Murray s response would be harsh but given his experience serving and loving the Congolese people his actions pointed to a more profound and effectual impact that lay beyond the charitable impulse Charity in its modern definition has come to mean the voluntary giving of help typically in the form of money to those in need Oxford In recent years the word has taken on a markedly pejorative connotation It is not uncommon to hear the refrain I don t need your charity This is because people know innately that charity is not free but it will cost them something According to theologian Jacques Ellul in the book Money and Power Almsgiving affirms the superiority of the giver who thus gains a point on the recipient binds him demands gratitude humiliates him and reduces him to a lower state than he had before Almsgiving acts this way because it is a money relationship and not a love relationship Harming the giver Charity may be harmful to the giver As we offer our time money and expertise we are filled with purpose and significance This in itself is not a problem However we are in grave danger when the nobility of our cause overshadows our compassion for

    Original URL path: http://www.usmb.org/news/article/The-cost-of-charity.html (2016-02-17)
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    My plan for a goat pasture outside the village would have been tantamount to opening a cafeteria for the lions and leopards of Southern Zaire 8 A sick goat is a dead goat When you sleep with your goat you usually notice when it s ill If animals sleep outside the village they may become sick and die before you notice An apparently sensible solution for raising goats had the potential for economic disaster should health problems enter a particular herd 9 Every goat in Africa has worms Goats raised in restricted areas have higher rates of infestation by internal parasites and are more susceptible to its consequences Though I did not understand the physiological principles involved I observed that health problems quickly spread throughout a herd when goats are raised in restricted quarters However well motivated my proposal for improved animal husbandry practices had yet another fatal flaw The goats of Southern Zaire taught me some important lessons First farmers know more about their problems than we development workers usually realize At the same time we understand much less than we think we do Generally things are not what they seem to be Urgent human needs often compel development workers to take immediate action We draw on our training as we interpret the problems of development and reflect our own experience as we suggest possible solutions Not surprisingly this can lead to big mistakes Second the process of development takes much longer than we imagine Introducing new solutions before we understand the problems they are designed to solve is a serious but common mistake It took me years to learn what Zairian farmers have always known Short term workers should be more modest in making development decisions Third real understanding comes through relationships I tested my goat fence proposal on various farmers who all agreed that it was a brilliant answer to a pressing local problem Thus convinced of its viability I moved ahead believing this is what the people want Much later I learned that my friends had carefully told me exactly what they thought I wanted to hear They did not want me to lose face or feel badly by disagreeing with my proposal Some also felt that I might have some inside information that superseded what everyone had known for generations that you couldn t raise goats inside fences under those conditions Only after I had established deeper personal relationships with several individuals did I begin to understand some of the deeper problems of the community Only then were people willing to point out the flaws and weaknesses in my suggestions Development is a process of growth through which people progressively become more aware of their own problems and committed to finding appropriate solutions We can facilitate that process provide technical information and encourage them in this quest for a better life We must however be modest in proposing solutions to problems we may not understand That understanding comes not as a result of our technical competence but through the personal relationships of trust with those whom we want to serve D Merrill Ewert was president of Fresno Pacific University from 2002 to 2012 and now carries the designation President Emeritus He earlier worked at Cornell University and Wheaton College and spent many years in development work including stints with Mennonite Central Committee and Medical Assistance Programs His article first appeared in this magazine in May June 1987 Leave a comment Comment Name E mail Post 0 Comments Lessons from the goats Sunday Jun 1 2014 The goats were a nuisance It made sense to fence them in Didn t it By D Merrill Ewert The ink was barely dry on my Tabor College diploma when I first arrived in Southern Zaire now DR Congo to manage a feeding program for tuberculosis patients at a Mennonite Brethren mission hospital With a grant from a European funding agency I was also encouraged to help local villagers address the agricultural problems of the region One of the first things I noticed was the goats that roamed freely through the villages Thin smelly and covered with flies they nonetheless wandered in and out of houses defecated in the compounds ate cassava people s staple food from the drying racks rummaged through the garbage and nibbled at the laundry drying in the sun The goats destroyed gardens in the community protected by small stick fences that were easily breached I saw families become angry at each other when the animals of one ate the vegetables of the other At best these goats were a health hazard and a general nuisance Raised on a Minnesota farm I had won awards for my pedigreed sheep I understood the basic principles of animal husbandry This experience combined with my anthropology courses at Tabor led me to conclude that there must be a better way to raise goats in Zaire Buidling a fence After discussions with several local farmers I ordered 50 rolls of wire from the United States that would be used to fence in farmers goats By fencing in the goats I reasoned the people would be rid of several problems They would also improve the nutrition of their animals that would graze on better grass in pastures outside the village Farmers could monitor their animals inside the fence and augment their diets with millet corn and grass I saw a potential breakthrough in goat production in the community through the introduction of this new technology Meanwhile political problems flared up in Zaire Mail was lost and messages went undelivered For reasons unknown my order for 50 rolls of wire never arrived at its destination The wire was never shipped and the goats continued to wreak havoc in the community I discovered however that most farmers could not have afforded to purchase rolls of wire from me Through observation and experience I also learned more about goats 1 God feeds the goats Farmers may be responsible for feeding their families but God

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    common story in all our gatherings The training we do for specific missions trips or service projects whether going across the border or across the street are essential to our desire to help without hurting Our training specifically hits issues such as worldview cultural awareness poverty and specific logistics from the people we are going to serve or help More important than specific training is striving in our youth ministry to share a common story and to tell it all the time This story centers on our understanding of God and our understanding of mission Telling this story repeatedly has helped to anchor our students in a theology and practice that truly benefits others Guiding Principle 5 Finishing what we start Several years ago a service team from an affluent church out of town came to our neighborhood to rebuild a broken fence that surrounded the backyard of a single lady The group took three days to rip down the entire fence in her backyard and then two days to build about half of the new fence Despite the unfinished work that left her backyard completely open the church group went home feeling really good about their ministry But this woman had a less than positive experience When we serve we commit to finishing what we start God became flesh The Apostle John opens his gospel story by saying In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and the Word was God He was with God in the beginning Through him all things were made without him nothing was made that has been made In him was life and that life was the light of men The light shines in the darkness but the darkness has not understood it The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us Two things strike me First is the reference to the creation story John seems intent on making it clear that God is doing something new that a new creation is at hand Just as God brought forth life out of chaos and nothingness in Genesis God is birthing a new creation through Jesus where all that is dead will be made alive and all that is broken will be fixed John also wants his readers to know that God chooses to roll up his sleeves and get dirty God doesn t do his work from a distance but from the trenches and chaos of our current situation God became flesh and moved into the neighborhood Too many churches engage mission or service from a distance We go into a certain setting for a short period of time with all of our answers but rarely does this kind of service produce any long lasting transformation May our service be anchored in a holistic theology as we strive to truly learn from those we go to serve entering into meaningful and lasting relationships of mutual respect And may we understand that when Christians who are transformed by the gospel of Jesus thoughtfully enter and intentionally engage in a broken community they will be a transformative presence Matt Ford is pastor of student and family ministries at North Fresno MB Church in Fresno Calif He has served in full time vocational youth ministry for 15 years and is a 2000 graduate of Fresno Pacific University and a 2012 graduate of Fresno Pacific Biblical Seminary He and his wife Beverly have three children Leave a comment Comment Name E mail Post 0 Comments Helping without hurting Sunday Jun 1 2014 How we can serve without damaging the people we are trying to help By Matt Ford What do the neighborhoods known as Blood Corner MacArthur Park and The Devil s Triangle have in common The answer is found in their stories I visited Blood Corner a few years ago while in Los Angeles with a group of fellow students from Fresno Pacific Biblical Seminary In 1989 there were more daytime murders on this corner then anywhere else in the United States and that s when it was nicknamed Blood Corner That same year John Perkins moved his family into the neighborhood Through the years more Christians bought homes in the neighborhood joining together for neighborhood transformation The neighborhood we saw did not look like the 1989 version and is no longer called Blood Corner A few days later our class visited another group of Christians who moved into the LA neighborhood near MacArthur Park an area that in the early 1990s was literally deemed a war zone by the national government based on the number of murders the neighborhood was experiencing Again the neighborhood we were seeing was drastically different then how it was described from the early 1990 s The Devil s Triangle a neighborhood in Fresno Calif defined by the triangle created by three major freeways is the community that my family moved into seven years ago This neighborhood is home to Fresno s highest crime rate and highest poverty In 1996 there were more murders on a quarter mile stretch of one of the neighborhood streets than anywhere else in the country During this time the Lowell neighborhood was known as The Devil s Triangle But today fewer and fewer people remember this title Each of these neighborhoods has one very important thing in common Each has changed due to the transformative presence of Christians moving into the neighborhood These communities may still be plagued by crime drug sales gang activity and poverty but things change when Christians intentionally move into neighborhoods and engage appropriately A philosophy of service These three stories have helped to anchor me in a philosophy of service Whether leading groups into a short term mission trip or being part of the on going community engagement in my own neighborhood my philosophy is the same We strive to do service in such a way as to support long term transformation This happens when our group is prepared both in appropriate skills and anchored in

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    marketplace for many years before heading to Peru However that didn t prevent their children from having childhood experiences that gave them a broader sense of the world Toby and Michaela both attended dual immersion school in Fresno so were already fluent in Spanish before arriving in Peru Prayer In every sphere of life but particularly in full time ministry the prayer piece is so crucial Lowell says He notes his prayer life has changed It s less a morning devotions thing and more of a constant communication Canadian missionary nurse Herta Voth modeled this for the Ens family in Panama She taught us and the kids that the first thing was prayer and then the injection says Harold Lowell has learned that it s not only his own prayers but those of others that have impact It s become crucial to send out newsletters he says We almost sit there and wait for people to respond All they have to do is write back and say We re praying for you That s what I need to know We can sense when people are praying for us says Lowell We should have been robbed by now we should have been mugged it s only by the grace of God and people who have prayed for us he says And in the really tough times like when young son Timothy contracted multiple infections and landed up in the hospital when you don t know how to pray the body of Christ comes around you knowing they are praying for you it s such an amazing experience In his years in mission administration Harold crisscrossed the globe and visited hundreds of North American MB churches He s taken planes trains and automobiles aplenty and all the danger that comes with travel international and domestic It s only by God s grace I m here for retirement he says Many times in churches where I d go for mission conferences in the back people would stop me and say Just want to let you know we pray for you every day There were hundreds that had me on their prayer list Carmen has received countless emails saying We re praying for you and seen her name on a particular calendar date So often it coincides with a very specific need or impact season says Carmen We see how clearly the Lord is speaking to his faithful prayer warriors We don t have to be proximally close He knows our needs before we ask He s already raised up people to stand in the gap Humbled and encouraged she appreciates those who also pray for the people we have grown to love the hearts we have seen open to the gospel It feels so not alone Harold recalls the joy of the news that Carmen s language helper for whom he and Helen had prayed for years had opened her heart to Jesus It s the Lord s timing says Carmen He is orchestrating He loves prayer because it brings his picture in our world helps us see so much more clearly his heavenly agenda Just recently Carmen says the prison where she leads a Bible study allowed a baptism for the young women inmates whose lives had been transformed My heart and my hope is it will encourage people who are praying they would know God is hearing them pray not just about people who are here but about a global team working together to see his kingdom come she says Lowell values prayer support above all When we were fundraising I told people It s great if you help our financial needs but I d rather you just pray for us God s got the money if you will commit to pray for us I know that God will take care of the rest Sacrifice Overseas work is full of variety and adventure and risk and sacrifice When young Helen and Harold left for DR Congo Helen remembers her mother saying I know you want to follow God but don t you think he could use you a little closer to home They laughed at the time but when Carmen left for Thailand with 8 month old Connor Harold and Helen experienced that feeling of loss But Helen says We felt it was better for them to be where God is calling them than close by Sometimes the tough things are unexpected Returning to the U S when Harold took a job in administration was actually the most difficult cross cultural experience In cosmopolitan Panama City the children daily moved between three cultures American expatriates Hispanic Panamanians indigenous Wounaan and Emberra with ease Relocating to Hillsboro a town of 3 000 the children said Where are the stoplights says Harold Lowell found it bizarre there was only one black person in the entire town I remember my high school friends looking at me thinking poor missionary kid I was looking at them the same way As his adjustment to U S life was rough Lowell has watched his children struggle in Peru Despite Lowell and Melissa s best intentions to immerse their children in the culture the school system of rote learning was so ill suited for the children that Melissa ended up home schooling Lacking opportunities to know either local or expatriate peers Mikaela Toby and Timothy especially missed deep friendships with children they can understand at a profound level With a clear call to mission from the time she was 15 Carmen s choices were filtered through that sense of direction I remember a real unsettledness I consistently felt this urge in my heart to go on mission she says Seeing deep seated despair and fear in the eyes of her host family on a short term mission trip to Thailand Carmen s call was confirmed as she heard God saying to her This is a people with no hope Will you come back and give them hope Debriefing her trip later she resolved If you God ask me to be a single old missionary in a hut telling my Thai mom and dad about you I will do it In the end she did go into the field with a family but learned there were challenges in that as well Three months into her 10 year commitment to Thailand she recalls calling out to the Lord saying God I did not sign up for this in context of what did I think I was doing bringing my family to the mission field When her young son came home from Thai nursery school saying Buddhist prayers she learned to trust that God s promises for my children are the same He will never leave or forsake us he s called us and will finish the work he began Faithfulness God s faithfulness is where the story starts and ends It s been the best of all worlds if I look back now over 13 years raising my children overseas says Carmen The Lord has blessed us Lowell says Mission has been such a part of us I have no regrets for having followed God s call to Peru It has been a risk taking adventure for all of us Peru will always be part of our hearts Even as he brings his family home to the U S he trusts his children will have an inheritance of mission as he did Things of this world don t have the same value to us as they do for other people We re building up stores in heaven Lowell sees himself in a sending role supporting missions through prayer and finances and encouraging others even families to try short term experiences I would rather put 500 toward a mission trip for Christmas than give presents he says I m convinced that every believer is called to be a leader for Jesus a person of kingdom influence says Matt We have different expressions different platforms but the same call to go and make disciples Anyone can raise missional minded children by grabbing the opportunities you ve got says Helen Encourage multicultural exposure says Harold Learn another language Have people in your home who are not like you If you can travel go into other cultures Even in North America parents can stretch their children s understanding of the world If there s a missionary coming to your area bring them home let them get to know your kids says Helen In your own city get outside your comfort zone so your kids can know there are other precious people besides your own kind This article was first published in the MB Herald the English language magazine of the Canadian Conference of MB Churches and is reprinted with permission Leave a comment Comment Name E mail Post 1 Comments Joy Asimisi Olayiwola 2015 02 28 04 27 40 0 Praise the Lord I have been looking for and inquiring about Harold and Helen Ens for decades now You see in 1971 I a young teenage girl from Congo Kinshasa traveled with them and their 3 children from Congo to Fresno California I have since lost touch with them but am still living in Southern California Please relay this piece of information to them I really would like to reconnect with them again I may also be contacted via my cell phone 909 568 9122 I patiently wait forward to a reply God s blessings Joy Harold and Helen Ens develop a legacy of mission Sunday Jun 1 2014 Ens parents children reflect on what makes a missionary family By Karla Braun Four decades ago Harold Ens opted to teach high school in Colombia where he met his wife Helen That decision set the course of the couple s life and that of their three children and their families It was a simple choice that set an unexpected life trajectory that guides a family on mission into the third generation In the 1960s a newly minted U S Mennonite teacher chose voluntary service with the Mennonite Brethren teaching high school in Colombia as conscientious objection to the U S army Some four decades later Harold Ens is retired from a missionary career that included service in DR Congo and Panama and as mission administrator first of Latin America then as general director of the international MB mission agency Now he and Helen watch their three children and families serve God Carmen and her husband Andy Owen in Thailand long term Lowell and his wife Melissa completing a three year term in Peru and Matt and his wife Anne nurturing a church plant in California So what turns one man s choice into a generational family business Discipleship Though Harold and Helen are the first to carry the title missionary the family legacy of mission heartedness doesn t start with them Growing up on a farm in Reedley Calif Harold watched his father develop chapels for farm workers and spend many a Sunday preaching to Dustbowl families I was exposed to this whole idea of mission in my childhood through my dad s work but I never thought that s what I was going to do he says with a laugh In rural Kansas Helen s parents always hosted traveling missionaries opening a door to the world for a girl living in a culturally homogenous community They thought a lot of missionaries she says and they encouraged her to serve an eye opening summer term with Mennonite Central Committee in Washington D C as a young woman From their respective locations Harold and Helen chose to join the Christian service team in Cali Colombia once they had graduated with their teaching certification and the rest is history Married in California upon their return to the U S they soon followed their sense of God s leading abroad again when they were apprised of need for a math teacher Harold s field in the international school in DR Congo Once their four year term was completed they were ready to come back and begin the American dream but God worked in our hearts They d settled into jobs and a house in a mountain town in California but they felt God asking What are you doing here Still calling themselves teachers not missionaries they prayed together and tentatively sent applications to MB Mission They landed in Panama City Panama taking a supporting role to the indigenous churches Growing up in Panama really gave the children a picture of mission says Harold Lowell Carmen and Matt learned by watching and doing At the Indian center in Panama City where Harold and Helen ministered to youth from Emberra and Wounaan tribes preteen Carmen s tasks involved making popsicles or preparing crafts for the children She recalls feeling it was a privilege to be there with my folks being involved in what they were doing Lowell who remembers accompanying his father on trips to the jungle took one of his own children with him when his work in Peru involved visiting churches a six to 10 hour bus ride away These trips are a highlight he says The children have learned to appreciate the Peruvians who are so different from them They love the people even in those rural churches In their church planting activities in Thailand Carmen and Andy gave their boys responsibility some sort of engagement even if just befriending a new child says Carmen We tried to bring them alongside so they were part of what we were doing Carmen is now working in member care and Andy serves as Southeast Asia Regional Team Leader so the children are less involved but son Connor who starred in MB Mission s multimedia children s curriculum on Thailand says I consider myself a missionary it s hard to think about life as being something else Discernment When the Enses returned to the U S for Harold to take up the mantle of administrator for the Latin American field We tried to be sensitive to our children how will we help our children grow and be discipled and have friends in Christian community says Harold In Hillsboro Kan where they settled there were three Mennonite Brethren churches two with ties to Helen s family but before Harold had a chance to check them out Carmen and Lowell had been drawn in by the youth group at the third So that was where the family went together Similarly the Owens make decisions as a family Even with big decisions like moving We ask the children to pray and hear from the Lord says Carmen This flows naturally out of searching God s Word together Morning devotions were just a standard for our family says Harold and Carmen has continued the tradition at the other end of the day Even if it s really late we share what the Lord has done in that day and pray about the hard things says Carmen We share highs and lows every day at dinner too and that becomes an opportunity to talk about how God is at work around us both transforming us and using us to impact others for his glory It rubs off It s really impacted me says Connor It s been good to have a regular rhythm of reading the Bible and talking about it with my parents Hospitality Our home was always open to people says Helen While in Panama several indigenous Panamanian students lived with the family for periods of several weeks to two years I think of those guys Panamanian students as my older brothers says Lowell Other times a couple would stay over for marriage counselling Back on U S soil we would invite anyone we found says Helen Matt says I experienced the heart of discipleship first hand He watched his parents adopt spiritual children as they trained empowered and promoted the next generation of local leaders in Panama The platform was anywhere the people were the indigenous church our Mitsubishi minivan our kitchen table he says Even after returning to the States Matt saw that going out from church walls was how kingdom impact happened Though it never left Lowell s heart to return overseas he and Melissa both worked in the marketplace for many years before heading to Peru However that didn t prevent their children from having childhood experiences that gave them a broader sense of the world Toby and Michaela both attended dual immersion school in Fresno so were already fluent in Spanish before arriving in Peru Prayer In every sphere of life but particularly in full time ministry the prayer piece is so crucial Lowell says He notes his prayer life has changed It s less a morning devotions thing and more of a constant communication Canadian missionary nurse Herta Voth modeled this for the Ens family in Panama She taught us and the kids that the first thing was prayer and then the injection says Harold Lowell has learned that it s not only his own prayers but those of others that have impact It s become crucial to send out newsletters he says We almost sit there and wait for people to respond All they have to do is write back and say We re praying for you That s what I need to know We can sense when people are praying for us says Lowell We should have been robbed by now we should have been mugged it s only by the grace of God and people who have prayed for us he says And in the really tough times like when young son Timothy contracted multiple infections and landed up in the hospital when you don t know how to pray the body of Christ comes around you knowing they are praying for you it s such an amazing experience In his years in mission administration Harold crisscrossed the globe and visited hundreds of North

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    Article 13 Article 14 Article 15 Article 16 Article 17 Article 18 Confession of Faith Condensed Version Confession of Faith Spanish Version Artículo 1 Artículo 2 Artículo 3 Artículo 4 Artículo 5 Artículo 6 Artículo 7 Artículo 8 Artículo 9 Artículo 10 Artículo 11 Artículo 12 Artículo 13 Artículo 14 Artículo 15 Artículo 16 Artículo 17 Artículo 18 Anabaptism The 12 Principles of Anabaptism Christian Leader Mission USA MUSA National

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    Article 16 Article 17 Article 18 Confession of Faith Condensed Version Confession of Faith Spanish Version Artículo 1 Artículo 2 Artículo 3 Artículo 4 Artículo 5 Artículo 6 Artículo 7 Artículo 8 Artículo 9 Artículo 10 Artículo 11 Artículo 12 Artículo 13 Artículo 14 Artículo 15 Artículo 16 Artículo 17 Artículo 18 Anabaptism The 12 Principles of Anabaptism Christian Leader Mission USA MUSA National Youth Board of Faith Life Events 2016 National Gathering Event Archives Contact Us News Find a Church Home In This Section News News Archive Developing in the SDC Thursday May 29 2014 Mission USA is actively involved in developing new USMB church plant projects A church plant is under development in the Southern District Conference SDC with solid backing from the SDC s Church Extension and Evangelism Commission CEEC and an existing SDC church Although I cannot divulge much more than that please be in prayer as this develops A church planter is needed and although we have a few ideas in mind as to who that might be selecting the right church planter is crucial for any planting project Two other projects are in initial discussion phases Again your support through prayer and giving is vital as we seek to plant churches that will reach people who don t know Jesus yet Don Morris Mission USA director Leave a comment Comment Name E mail Post 0 Comments Developing in the SDC Thursday May 29 2014 Mission USA is actively involved in developing new USMB church plant projects A church plant is under development in the Southern District Conference SDC with solid backing from the SDC s Church Extension and Evangelism Commission CEEC and an existing SDC church Although I cannot divulge much more than that please be in prayer as this develops A church planter

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    toward developing a core team in Fremont which is located 25 30 miles northwest of Omaha The name Sanctuary Fremont comes from the understanding that a sanctuary is a place of rest healing safety redemption and restoration That s what Wes and Michele hope and pray people will find in this new USMB church plant in this established city of 26 000 This kind of ministry focus is much needed in this community says Wes Fremont a city with a lively main street and hometown atmosphere is in great need of churches that are missionally minded Wes just completed a very successful teaching tenure at Grace University in Omaha and in that role developed a reputation as someone who connects well with people of all ages and one who cares deeply about each person he interacts with Wes says I want to be more like God in His love for lost people Michele enjoys having people in her home which will likely be the new church s first meeting place The Wilmers are looking for a larger home in Fremont as they currently live in one side of a duplex apartment They have a five year old girl Kolaya This summer Wes will preach frequently at Stony Brook Church and will be involved in providing some pastoral care gaining more experience and refreshing his preaching and ministry skills Although no set date has been established for a public launch of the new church discussions have focused around a Christmas 2014 or early 2015 time frame Sanctuary Fremont is supported as a joint partnership plant of the Central District Conference Stony Brook Church and Mission USA Please pray for the Wilmers as they transition to becoming full time church planters Leave a comment Comment Name E mail Post 1 Comments Becky 2015 01 08 18 09 41 0 I am excited for this new church I recently met Wes Michelle and they are wonderful people Caring Kind and wanting to be like Jesus Announcing a new church plant in Nebraska Friday May 23 2014 Wes and Michele Wilmer are the church plant couple planting a new MB church in Fremont Neb called Sanctuary Fremont This new church is being planted in relationship with Stony Brook Church Omaha Neb itself a current USMB church plant Wes will begin his role as resident church planter on June 1 while serving at Stony Brook for the next several months At the same time he and Michele will devote energy toward developing a core team in Fremont which is located 25 30 miles northwest of Omaha The name Sanctuary Fremont comes from the understanding that a sanctuary is a place of rest healing safety redemption and restoration That s what Wes and Michele hope and pray people will find in this new USMB church plant in this established city of 26 000 This kind of ministry focus is much needed in this community says Wes Fremont a city with a lively main street and hometown

    Original URL path: http://www.usmb.org/news/article/Announcing-a-new-church-plant-in-Nebraska.html (2016-02-17)
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