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  • Vincent Caprio's Blog Evolving Innovations » 2011 » October
    THE DEADLINE IS MONDAY OCTOBER 10th Denver Marriott West http www marriott com hotels travel denwe denver marriott west 1717 Denver West Blvd Golden Colorado 80401 Toll free 888 238 1803 303 279 9100 Room Rate 141 per night When making your reservation be sure to use the code Nano Energy Summit to receive your discounted rate REGISTER TODAY 200 https events r20 constantcontact com register eventReg oeidk a07e4mmra3dfca3076d oseq NANO NEWS IBM Intel Start 4 4 Billion Chip Venture in New York http www sfgate com cgi bin article cgi f g a 2011 09 27 bloomberg articlesLS70QB6K50XS DTL Lux Capital Fall 2011 Updates http luxcapital com newsletter fall 2011 html Dr E Clayton Teague Joins Pixelligent s Advisory Board http www prnewswire com news releases dr e clayton teague joins pixelligents advisory board 129899808 html Quantum dot technology brings richer colors to TVs video http venturebeat com 2011 09 30 quantum dot technology video utm source feedburner utm medium email utm campaign Feed 3A Venturebeat 28VentureBeat 29 Thank you all for your participation in Boston and I look forward to seeing many of you in Denver Regards Vincent Caprio Serving the Nanotechnology Community for Over a Decade Executive Director NanoBusiness Commercialization Association 203 733 1949 vincent nanobca org www nanobca org NEXT WEEK NanoBusiness Nanomanufacturing Summit 2011 9 25 9 27 Boston MA Posted on October 13th 2011 in Uncategorized No Comments Our Conference agenda http www internano org nms2011 program has over 50 speakers from our Nano Community I hope you can join us at our 10th Annual NanoBusiness Conference Nanomanufacturing Summit 2011 http www internano org nms2011 The conference is being held September 25th 27th at the Seaport World Trade Center in Boston MA http www seaportboston com meetings and events overview aspx REGISTER TODAY Industry Government 400 https regstg com Registration RegForm aspx rid 9363e8fe 34c5 4188 9ecb f1a5852ef5f3 University Academia 200 https regstg com Registration RegForm aspx rid 9363e8fe 34c5 4188 9ecb f1a5852ef5f3 SUNDAY September 25 2011 6 00 7 30 Opening Reception Jeffrey Morse Managing Director National Nanomanufacturing Network Vincent Caprio Executive Director NanoBusiness Commercialization Association MONDAY September 26 2011 KEYNOTES 8 30 9 00 Senator Scott Brown R MA Invited 9 00 9 30 Sally Tinkle PhD Acting Director EHS Coordinator NNCO 9 30 10 00 George Thompson PhD Government Programs Manager Intel 10 00 10 30 Ross Kozarsky Analyst Lux Research 1 15 2 00 Peter L Antoinette President CEO Nanocomp Technologies Inc 4 00 4 30 Scott Livingston Chairman CEO Livingston Securities 4 30 5 00 Doug Jamison CEO Managing Director Harris Harris Group SPEAKERS 8 25 Opening Remarks Jeffrey Morse Managing Director National Nanomanufacturing Network Vincent Caprio Executive Director NanoBusiness Commercialization Association 10 30 12 30 What s up with EPA and NIOSH and NANO An Interactive Discussion with EHS Experts Session Chair Lynn L Bergeson Bergeson Campbell P C Charles Geraci PhD Coordinator Nanotechnology Research Center NIOSH Kenneth T Moss Nanotech Team Leader USEPA New Chemicals Management Branch

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  • Vincent Caprio's Blog Evolving Innovations » 2011 » September
    smaller than a virus these tiny phosphors convert blue light from a standard GaN LED into different wavelengths based upon their size Larger dots emit longer wavelengths red while smaller dots emit shorter wavelengths green By blending together a mix of dot colors Nanosys can engineer a new spectrum of light This allows LCD manufacturers to accurately match their LED backlight to their LCD color filters to achieve the best possible color and efficiency performance The result is professional photo and cinema level color performance in the palm of your hand or on your living room wall Nanosys Quantum Dot Enhancement Film QDEF enables LCD display manufacturers to deliver a better visual experience using their existing manufacturing processes at a fraction of the cost of alternatives Architected from quantum dots Nanosys QDEF improves color gamut saturation and brightness from LED sources using widely available material while delivering higher power efficiency and lower cost than alternatives like OLED SW Let s talk about Nanosys energy storage technology What is the nano enabled energy technology you are developing and what type of near term commercial applications do you foresee in the market JH Improvements in battery capacity have historically been quite slow far outpaced by our demand for more features in our mobile devices and now range in our cars People in the battery industry talk about a Moore s Law for batteries which equates to about a decade per doubling of capacity Part of the problem is that looking at the periodic table some of the best elements in terms of energy storage potential are also the hardest to work with For example although it has a very high capacity for lithium insertion no one has been able to make a stable battery using bulk silicon So manufacturers have been limited to making process improvements using graphites things like squeezing more materials onto their electrodes by compressing them or using thinner and thinner electrode substrates However there is a practical limit to process improvements and the rate with which they can be made This is where Nanosys comes in by architecting materials we are able to solve some of the problems limiting the use of new compounds Our SiNANOde material a silicon carbon composite anode material for lithium ion batteries has a unique morphology that manages lithium insertion in a way that doesn t cause cyclic damage This mitigates the swelling effect from conventional non architected or bulk silicon structures The end result is a battery that holds more than double the charge without significant changes to manufacturing process This kind of dramatic change means you can start thinking about achieving the industry s cost goal of 250 kWh and taking EV adoption to the next level As far as adoption we see immediate applications for SiNANOde in IT devices like cell phones digital cameras and notebook computers Qualification timing is relatively short for electronics vs automotive applications which take quite a bit longer So we are working here first and planning to move into EVs over time In the medium term we think that SiNANOde is well suited for use in traction applications such as EV plug in hybrid PHEV and personal mobility LEV Energy density remains a critical problem for the electric car If you look at a typical EV today they are wasting a lot of energy carrying the weight of the batteries down the road SW What kinds of challenges do you see in the future for Nanosys in terms of commercializing innovative nano enabled products JH I see our biggest challenge as being able to scale up manufacturing to keep up with demand which isn t a bad problem to have Our facility in Palo Alto is more than capable of meeting current customer demand but we also have a plan in place to increase our capacity while managing quality control and distribution SW Nanosys has a global reach with key strategic partners all over the world Do you see a big competitive advantage to having a global reach in nanotechnology today JH Absolutely If you are working with OEMs like we are then you have to have a presence in their countries of operation Last year we opened an office in Korea specifically for this purpose We believe very strongly in maintaining our core operations here in the U S due to the skilled labor available here but also operate globally with the largest automobile and electronics manufacturers in the world SW Last question for you today Jason Where do see Nanosys heading in the next 3 5 years JH I see Nanosys enabled products in the hands of hundreds of millions of consumers providing higher quality and efficient displays longer lasting electronics and being a part of EVs that match combustion vehicles in range capacity SW Thanks again for your time Jason It was a pleasure speaking with you We wish you and your colleagues at Nanosys all the best in the future Looking forward to seeing you in Boston at our 10th Annual Conference Regards Vincent Caprio Serving the Nanotechnology Community for Over a Decade Executive Director NanoBusiness Commercialization Association 203 733 1949 vincent nanobca org www nanobca org FINAL PROGRAM NanoBusiness Nanomanufacturing Summit 2011 9 25 9 27 Boston MA Posted on September 7th 2011 in Uncategorized No Comments Our Conference agenda http www internano org nms2011 program has over 50 speakers from our Nano Community I hope you can join us at our 10th Annual NanoBusiness Conference Nanomanufacturing Summit 2011 http www internano org nms2011 The conference is being held September 25th 27th at the Seaport World Trade Center in Boston MA http www seaportboston com meetings and events overview aspx REGISTER TODAY Industry Government 400 500 after September 6 2011 https regstg com Registration RegForm aspx rid 9363e8fe 34c5 4188 9ecb f1a5852ef5f3 University Academia 200 250 after September 6 2011 https regstg com Registration RegForm aspx rid 9363e8fe 34c5 4188 9ecb f1a5852ef5f3 REGISTER FOR HOTEL TODAY Seaport Hotel connected to

    Original URL path: http://www.vincentcaprio.org/2011/09 (2016-05-02)
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  • Vincent Caprio's Blog Evolving Innovations » 2011 » August
    30 Electronics Michael Knapp CEO Cambrios Invited http cambrios sitestreet org 45 Bio Michael R Knapp htm 2 00 2 30 Nanomanufacturing Frank Ignazzitto Vice President Government Business QD Vision Inc http www qdvision com ignazzitto 3 00 3 30 Healthcare Mike Milburn Chief Scientific Officer Metabolon http www metabolon com about Management aspx NANO NEWS WEEKLY SUMMARY Harris Harris Equity Research Coverage Capitalizing on 10x Change http gallery mailchimp com d089f37e2290f94c07def3214 files Harris and Harris Update July 29 2011 pdf Solazyme and Cobalt Technologies Ranked Among the 30 Hottest Companies in Renewable Chemicals and Materials http www tinytechvc com releasedetail cfm ReleaseID 594801 Six Ways I Know Nanotechnology is Here to Stay By Scott Rickert Co Founder President CEO Nanofilm http www industryweek com articles six ways i know nanotechnology is here to stay 25035 aspx Obama vs the 1980s Tax reform not an infrastructure bank might save his presidency http online wsj com article SB10001424053111903454504576490083559745242 html KEYWORDS george gilder Please remember to register for your hotel room today http www seaportboston com See you in September Regards Vincent Caprio Serving the Nanotechnology Community for Over a Decade Executive Director NanoBusiness Commercialization Association 203 733 1949 vincent nanobca org www nanobca org HOTEL REMINDER NanoBusiness Nanomanufacturing Summit 2011 9 25 9 27 Boston MA Posted on August 9th 2011 in Uncategorized No Comments We are excited to update you on our Keynote Speaker lineup for our 10th Annual NanoBusiness Conference Nanomanufacturing Summit 2011 http www internano org nms2011 The conference is being held September 25th 27th at Seaport World Trade Center Boston MA http www seaportboston com meetings and events overview aspx REGISTER FOR HOTEL TODAY Seaport Hotel connected to the World Trade Center http www seaportboston com DEADLINE FRIDAY AUGUST 26 2011 We have sold out our room block for 9 years 219 per night Room block Nano Conference CONFERENCE REGISTRATION IS OPEN Industry Government 400 500 after August 26 2011 https regstg com Registration RegForm aspx rid 9363e8fe 34c5 4188 9ecb f1a5852ef5f3 University Academia 200 250 after August 26 2011 https regstg com Registration RegForm aspx rid 9363e8fe 34c5 4188 9ecb f1a5852ef5f3 2nd CALL FOR ABSTRACTS POSTERS Accepted until Friday August 26 2011 http www internano org nms2011 call OUR 2011 AGENDA IS TAKING SHAPE http www internano org nms2011 program SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 25 2011 6 00 7 30 Opening Reception MONDAY SEPTEMBER 26 2011 KEYNOTE PRESENTATIONS 8 30 9 00 Senator Scott Brown R MA Invited http scottbrown senate gov public 9 00 9 30 Sally Tinkle PhD Acting Director EHS Coordinator NNCO http www nsti org events NNI bio html id 54 9 30 10 00 George Thompson PhD Government Programs Manager Intel http www nanobusiness2010 com speakers 10 00 10 30 Josh Wolfe Founding Managing General Partner Lux Capital http www luxcapital com team wolfe php 4 00 4 30 Scott Livingston Chairman CEO Livingston Securities http www livingstonsecurities com about php 4 30 5 00 Doug Jamison CEO Managing Director Harris Harris Group

    Original URL path: http://www.vincentcaprio.org/2011/08 (2016-05-02)
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  • Vincent Caprio's Blog Evolving Innovations » 2011 » July
    community Topics include technical business regulatory and standards areas Abstracts for papers are being solicited for these key focus areas and topics having an emphasis on nanomanufacturing approaches applications research challenges along with scaled production and commercialization The technical program tracks and session sub topics further include Applications Markets and Commercialization Energy Power Environmental Health and Safety in Nanomanufacturing Green Nanomanufacturing Integrated Nanomanufacturing Processes Metrology Analytical Tools and Standards for Nanomanufacturing Nanoelectronics Sensors Nanomedicine Biotechnology Nanomanufacturing Workforce Training Needs Nanomaterials The conference is being held September 25th 27th at Seaport World Trade Center Boston MA http www seaportboston com meetings and events overview aspx Hotel Seaport Hotel connected to the World Trade Center http www seaportboston com REGISTRATION IS OPEN Industry Government 400 500 after August 26 2011 https regstg com Registration RegForm aspx rid 9363e8fe 34c5 4188 9ecb f1a5852ef5f3 University Academia 200 250 after August 26 2011 https regstg com Registration RegForm aspx rid 9363e8fe 34c5 4188 9ecb f1a5852ef5f3 NANO NEWS Harris Harris Article in Businessweek com Discusses Cobalt s Technology http www tinytechvc com releasedetail cfm ReleaseID 590479 Adesto Technologies and Altis Semiconductor Announce Partnership http www tinytechvc com releasedetail cfm ReleaseID 589331 Article in Crain s Cleveland Business Produced Water Absorbents Inc http www tinytechvc com releasedetail cfm ReleaseID 587542 mPhase Posts PowerPoint Presentation from Shareholder Meeting Held June 29 2011 http campaign r20 constantcontact com render llr e8zakgdab v 001U3o YTpC7rvsLOlbQ8SAmiodM63p5Ob4WDGoKfyHk82qwBTQRcRLRjWPPup GlqX9H UE5h8pNjQ65GIG4F2sBrif9BFZi7eKFYZQLoM32h2FX8cw6GeiA 3D 3D U S Rep Dan Lipinski Offers Proposal to Revitalize Middle Class Jobs http lemont patch com articles us rep dan lipinski offers proposal to revitalize middle class jobs 2 Looking forward to receiving your abstracts and hope to see you in September Regards Vincent Caprio Serving the Nanotechnology Community for Over a Decade Executive Director NanoBusiness Commercialization Association 203 733 1949 vincent nanobca org www nanobca org 10th Annual NanoBusiness Nanomanufacturing Summit 2011 9 25 9 27 Boston MA Posted on July 18th 2011 in Uncategorized No Comments Today we are proud to announce our Keynote lineup for our 10th Annual NanoBusiness Conference Nanomanufacturing Summit 2011 http www internano org nms2011 The conference is being held September 25th 27th at Seaport World Trade Center Boston MA http www seaportboston com meetings and events overview aspx Hotel Seaport Hotel connected to the World Trade Center http www seaportboston com REGISTRATION IS OPEN Industry Government 400 500 after August 26 2011 https regstg com Registration RegForm aspx rid 9363e8fe 34c5 4188 9ecb f1a5852ef5f3 University Academia 200 250 after August 26 2011 https regstg com Registration RegForm aspx rid 9363e8fe 34c5 4188 9ecb f1a5852ef5f3 OUR 2011 AGENDA IS TAKING SHAPE AND OUR KEYNOTE LINEUP IS FABULOUS http www internano org nms2011 program SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 25 2011 6 00 7 30 Opening Reception MONDAY SEPTEMBER 26 2011 8 30 9 00 Keynote Senator Scott Brown R MA Invited http scottbrown senate gov public 9 00 9 30 Keynote Sally Tinkle PhD Acting Director EHS Coordinator NNCO http www nsti org events NNI bio html id 54 9 30 10 00 Keynote George Thompson PhD Government Programs Manager Intel http www nanobusiness2010 com speakers 10 00 10 30 Keynote Josh Wolfe Founding Managing General Partner Lux Capital Invited http www luxcapital com team wolfe php 4 00 4 30 Keynote Scott Livingston Chairman CEO Livingston Securities http www livingstonsecurities com about php 4 30 5 00 Keynote Doug Jamison CEO Managing Director Harris Harris Group http www tinytechvc com team cfm TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 27 2011 8 30 9 00 Keynote Scott Rickert Co Founder President CEO NanoFilm http www nanofilmtechnology com about nanofilm bio scott htm 9 00 9 30 Keynote Dr Mihail C Roco Senior Advisor for Nanotechnology National Science Foundation http www nsf gov eng staff mroco jsp 9 30 10 00 Keynote Jim Hussey CEO Nanoink http www nanoink net management team html 10 00 10 30 Keynote David Arthur CEO SouthWest NanoTechnologies Inc http www swentnano com about management php 1 15 2 00 Keynote Jim Phillips CEO NanoMech http www nanomech biz company profile leadership NANO NEWS WEEKLY SUMMARY Six Ways I Know Nanotechnology is Here to Stay by Scott Rickert Co Founder President CEO NanoFilm http www industryweek com articles six ways i know nanotechnology is here to stay 25035 aspx SectionID 4 3M introduces new window film http www startribune com business 125343818 html Nanoscientists build antenna for light http www physorg com news 2011 07 nanoscientists antenna html Nanocrystal transformers http www rdmag com News 2011 07 Materials Nanotechnology Nanocrystal Transformers I hope you are all having a relaxing and peaceful summer with your family Start planning for the fall Regards Vincent Caprio Serving the Nanotechnology Community for Over a Decade Executive Director NanoBusiness Commercialization Association 203 733 1949 vincent nanobca org www nanobca org NanoBusiness Interview Anil R Diwan President Chairman NanoViricides Posted on July 18th 2011 in Uncategorized No Comments We were in DC last week on Wednesday June 22nd for the 2011 Nano Caucus http www vincentcaprio org senate convenes nano caucus briefing wednesday june 22nd We had the honor of Senator Ron Wyden D OR kicking off the Nano Caucus Then we had presentations from Sally Tinkle Ph D Acting Director National Nanotechnology Coordination Office Nanoscale Science Engineering and Technology Subcommittee Committee on Technology National Science and Technology Council Jim Hussey Chief Executive Officer Nanoink Inc Travis Earles Ph D Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Initiatives Lockheed Martin Corporation and former Assistant Director of Nanotechnology White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Frank A Ignazzitto Vice President Government Business QD Vision Inc I would like to thank Lynn Bergeson Partner Bergeson Campbell and Chair of the NanoBusiness Commercialization Association EHS Committee for helping to organize the event In this month s interview we talk to Anil R Diwan Ph D President and Chairman of NanoViricides Dr Diwan has extensive product discovery and development experience while raising financing from collaborations SBIR grants and other revenues He has extensive experience in a number of bio pharmaceutical biosciences and biomedical fields and technologies that leads to his novel integrative approach in solving problems with low costs high innovation and world leading feature sets Dr Diwan is the inventor developer and principal investor of TheraCour and NanoViricides technologies The nanomaterials based on these technologies form the basis of Nanoviricides drugs Anil holds a US patent on his older polymeric micelle technologies with his colleagues at University of Massachusetts He has continued to work further in the field to develop nanomaterials that are capable of multi specific multi targeting of viruses and at the same time capable of encapsulating active pharmaceutical ingredients API in industry leading payload capacities This new work has resulted in nanomaterials called TheraCour therapeutic courier and the underlying technology is the subject of several new patent applications Multi targeting means the binding of nanoviricide polymer chain to the virus particle like a Velcro tape with multiple points of contact and Multi specificity enables highly selective binding to a specific type of virus The encapsulated API can get injected into the virus particle Anil holds a Ph D from Rice University TX a B Tech from Indian Institute of Technology Bombay IIT B India and has consistently held high scholastic ranks and honors Anil has over 18 years of Bio Pharmaceuticals R D experience with 12 years as an entrepreneur In our interview we discuss NanoViricides technology and its applications in medicine We hope you enjoy the interview with Anil Diwan Steve Waite Director of Research and Strategy The NanoBusiness Commercialization Association DISCLAIMER All of the information and opinions contained in this document including the potential and future of NanoViricides technologies and Products are the personal views of Anil R Diwan Ph D and are not official statements by NanoViricides Inc Information presented herein contains forward looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21B of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Any statements that express or involve discussions with respect to predictions expectations beliefs plans projections objectives goals assumptions or future events or performance are not statements of historical fact and may be forward looking statements Forward looking statements are based on expectations estimates and projections at the time the statements are made that involve a number of risks and uncertainties which could cause actual results or events to differ materially from those presently anticipated Forward looking statements in this action may be identified through the use of words such as projects foresee expects will anticipates estimates believes understands or that by statements indicating certain actions may could or might occur SW Thanks for taking the time to speak with us Anil We enjoyed your presentation at the NanoBusiness conference in New York City in April Give us a little history about NanoViricides and why you launched the company AD I became interested in the field of gene therapy and drug delivery in the late 80 s The delivery problems in gene therapy oligonucleotide and antisense therapy were quite complex So I set my goals to less difficult issues It was very clear to me that the then existing anticancer therapies were just cell killing chemicals and that they kill any cell that they can not cancer cells specifically This is like strafing with a machine gun onto a crowd when you only want to kill one terrorist That is unacceptable So I set out to develop novel technologies which would be able to take such drugs keep them away from normal cells and put them into cancer cells where they would destroy the cancer cell SW NanoViricides products are based on TheraCour technology that has been in development since the early 1990s What is special about the TheraCour technology and Nanoviricides AD Imagine a truck that you can load up with bombs and then program it to find a particular enemy target and let it roam for thousands of miles until it hits and explodes onto the target That is what the TheraCour technology enables Very few other technologies have such capability When it comes to the nitty gritty of drug development there are a number of additional features that are built into the platform technology you get them for free such as biocompatibility and biodegradability If a foreign substance is put into the human body especially a substance in the nano or micro scale size range the immune system recognizes it as foreign and mounts an attack on it to clear it out of the system Nanoviricides are highly biocompatible materials which means that they are designed so that the immune system should not mount an attack against them So the possibility of adverse events becomes very limited In addition a potent drug such as this should eliminate itself after it has done its job We accomplish this by making nanoviricides biodegradable in the body itself In other words they are designed to work for a length of time and then become food to the body or get excreted otherwise SW What are some of the viruses you are targeting with your NanoViricides technology AD Influenza binds to human cells through a relatively simple receptor called sialic acid So we started working on influenza first This program is now developed to the point that we have clinical quality candidates and we are developing additional datatsets for US FDA pre IND application filing You may recall the great bird flu scare in 2005 2006 We could not get access to the bird flu H5N1 virus so we went to VietNam and conducted studies there to develop nanoviricide drug candidates that were highly effective against different H5N1 types in cell based assays In the process we also began working on anti Rabies nanoviricides and achieved preliminary successes in animal studies We then started working with USAMRIID to develop nanoviricides against the killer viruses of the Ebola and Marburg families We received tremendous success in our very first animal studies with nanoviricides against HIV I We also developed nanoviricides against adenoviral EKC epidemic keratoconunctivitis a severe red eye disease Dengue and recently against oral and genital Herpes viruses HSV 1 and HSV 2 Nanoviricides is a broad technology platform and once we develop a ligand for a virus family we can construct nanoviricides to attack that virus family In summary we now have several commercially important drug programs that include Influenza HIV HSV and viral diseases of the external eye We also have some neglected tropical diseases NTD programs that include Dengue and Rabies In addition we have a BioDefense program that includes Ebola Marburg and a novel technology that we call ADIF for accurate drug in field The number of targets is only limited by availability of resources There are a large number of viral diseases that do not have good medicines or vaccines available against them And Nature keeps throwing new challenges at us constantly Like the SARS outbreak and the recent H1N1 2009 swine flu pandemic SW Tell us more about NanoViricides flu product Why do you think it will be more effective than the other products available on the market today AD When we conducted our very first anti Influenza animal study we found that the nanoviricide candidates were substantially superior to oseltamivir Tamiflu Roche By some metrics the best was 8X more effective Of course the efficacy of Tamiflu itself is very limited In particular it is not strong enough to be useful against severe killer influenzas like the H5N1 bird flu or other highly pathogenic avian influenzas HPAI We had some successes against H5N1 already So we began improving our drug candidates with classical methods called SAR or structure activity relationship optimizations We call this anti influenza drug program FluCide The best FluCide drug candidate last year caused about 30 fold reduction in lung viral load which was about 15 fold greater than Tamiflu in mice We took one more run at SAR this year when we were getting the processes ready for manufacture Three of these newly optimized FluCide drug candidates achieved 1 000 fold or greater reduction in lung viral load as opposed to less than 2 fold on Tamiflu Two of the nanoviricide treated groups survived the full 21 day study but died a day later Another one survived 20 days In contrast Tamiflu treated animals survived only 8 days while untreated animals died in just 5 days If we look at the viral load these optimized FluCide candidates are about 500X 50 000 superior to Tamiflu That is truly astounding SW How is NanoViricides approaching combating the HIV AIDS virus and what role can nanotechnology play in treating HIV AIDS patients AD Two questions Let me tell you what we are doing first The HIV AIDS virus enters human cells using two different receptor pairs either CD4 and CCR5 or CD4 and CXCR4 or both pairs It also uses some other features The CD4 binding site is conserved and well studied The CCR5 and CXCR4 binding of HIV has also been studied in some detail So we have plenty of information to develop HIV binding ligands to construct anti HIV nanoviricides We are focusing on mimicking the CD4 site where HIV binds If we are successful we believe we will be able to create nanoviricides which do not lose much effectiveness when the virus mutates That is the holy grail of HIV therapy We already have significant initial success in animal studies We found that some of the nanoviricide drug candidates gave equal effectiveness against HIV 1 infection as the three drug standard therapy called HAART highly active antiretroviral therapy HAART is highly effective but quite noxious It causes vomiting lack of appetite cachexia weight loss and lipid redistribution hunchback effect We did not see any signs of potential adverse effects in animals treated with HIVCide candidates unlike in the HAART treated mice HIV animal studies are extremely expensive This program has been moving very slowly But we believe we will continue to build on our success as we have done with Influenza Now about the role of nanotechnology in HIV AIDS Nanotechnology can provide research tools like more sensitive tests and parallel testing which can speed up progress We believe that the nanoviricides technology may already have enabled Functional Cure of HIV AIDS if our animal study results hold in humans The next challenge is a true or complete cure This would require eliminating the reservoirs of HIV in addition to the functional cure I think nanotechnology holds a great promise here Personally I don t believe there is a solution to this problem without using nanotechnology SW NanoViricides is working on treatment for Rabies What is novel about your approach to treating Rabies AD Rabies is a uniformly fatal infection There are very few patients who have survived and they are all severely disabled A single rabies virus particle is sufficient to cause death in humans The available antibody based treatments have shown protection in animal studies It is not known if these treatments are therapeutic in humans As I said earlier nanoviricides are far beyond antibody therapies in terms of their design If an antibody therapy exists then we can develop a nanoviricide therapy Animal studies for rabies are a contrived model at best However the very first anti rabies nanoviricides we developed demonstrated a therapeutic effect i e treatment after infection in mice In one experiment 30 of the animals infected with lethal dose of rabies virus survived due to nanoviricide treatment Rabies therapy development has many challenges It is not an important disease in the developed world so there is very limited funding if any There are also many scientific challenges Rabies virus which is usually introduced by an animal bite such as an infected bat dog raccoon etc quickly travels to the brain through nerves There it colonizes inside the brain cells The time from a bite to rabies disease symptoms in humans can vary from a few days to decades When

    Original URL path: http://www.vincentcaprio.org/2011/07 (2016-05-02)
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  • Vincent Caprio's Blog Evolving Innovations » 2011 » June
    today JJ Nanophase is built from an idea that grew out of the Argonne National Laboratory the ability to make pure metal oxide particles for particular applications at the nano scale Often manufacturers are forced to use materials with impurities or with secondary structures that don t provide the effectiveness they are looking for With this technology we can provide metal oxides to manufacturers in any form dry powder dispersed in liquid or dispersed into a plastic flake that is ready to use in their process with the desired attributes ranging from particle size and shape to particular surface chemistries It was a better way to provide manufacturers with materials they needed SW What are the primary nanomaterials produced by Nanophase and why is the company focused on those materials JJ The most popular is nano zinc oxide used in personal care applications such as sunscreens for sensitive skin Zinc oxide is an excellent all natural full spectrum UV ray absorber Using nano zinc oxide allows that glob of white cream that we used to see decorating so many lifeguard s noses to be clear today Zinc oxide is gentler on the skin than many of the organic chemicals used to achieve the same purpose so we have noticed an uptick in use in both sensitive skin sunscreen applications as well as certain daily wear cosmetics Our material is also considered an all natural or mineral based product which resonates with quality conscious consumers Just as zinc oxide protects human skin it also is effective in certain UV protection applications such as for exterior coatings paints and stains and many other applications Beyond zinc oxide we have developed a family of aluminum oxide additives to impart a thin layer of scratch resistance to high end packaging signage and consumer electronics products We also use cerium oxide for polishing applications from semiconductor and other electronics applications through architectural window solutions We typically sell chemical additives but our polishing expertise allowed us to launch our first complete product line for window polishing and restoration under the NanoUltra family of products These are the most common products we sell but we also sell smaller amounts of several other metal oxides for particular applications We have a very flexible manufacturing platform that allows us to pursue markets broadly SW There are numerous applications for nanomaterials in the 21st century Tell us about the applications Nanophase is currently targeting in the market JJ Several areas where we see significant opportunities in the near term are natural UV protection in personal care e g sunscreens and daily wear cosmetics providing scratch resistance in transparent coatings UV resistance in architectural coatings and a series of other applications that are too early stage to mention We fully understand that we will increase and decrease our focus in various markets as we grow and gain more commercial feedback The underlying need for both transparent functional coatings and well dispersed active materials provides us with more opportunities than we can possibly address simultaneously For now focus is the key SW What are the major advantages to a sunscreen product that is produced with your nanomaterials JJ Our nano zinc oxide provides a terrific combination of being very effective while gentle Unlike many solutions on the market nano zinc oxide is a full spectrum UV blocker meaning that it minimizes the effects of UVA and UVB radiation very well Many products have historically focused on UVB for blocking sunburn without paying as much attention to UVA which relates to cellular degradation and skin cancer New label requirements in Europe and likely soon to be in the United States maybe this year will require this be better disclosed and you ve likely already seen products on the shelves that are dealing with these disclosures Sunscreens with our materials are designed to be long lasting even when used in water And zinc oxide tends to be gentle on the skin more so than many of the organic chemicals commonly used These reasons explain why our products are often found in sensitive skin products and also explain why we are a natural choice for daily wear cosmetics SW Please tell us more about the transparent UV resistant coatings for wood that Nanophase is developing What are its advantages relative to existing products on the market JJ The most effective wood coatings today tend to rely on heavy pigments to achieve UV protection so that the wood will often look red or orange depending on the pigment being used There s nothing wrong with those colors but many would prefer the natural look of their wood and simply want it to last longer We have seen that our nanomaterials can improve the effectiveness of coatings significantly particularly in the transparent and lighter pigmented semi transparent applications We are working with customers to take the basic technology to market in both semi transparent and completely transparent wood coatings This is an area where we hold a significant advantage over the tradeoffs that historically had to be made protection vs transparency Our solutions offer the market both SW What are some of the futuristic nanomaterials applications Nanophase is working on that you can share with us JJ Working at a small scale with significant control over the particles has provided potentially huge energy applications that we are working on although it will take some time to determine viability Very thin transparent coatings also present strong potential advantages in plastics applications We have recently devised a method for adding our materials into several traditional plastics fabrication processes and are working with alpha customers on different applications Either of these concept areas could launch a company today but we are looking at them as additional areas for the strategic growth of our company which already has a good history and understanding in creating and then manufacturing these solutions SW Do you sense there is a misconception today among policymakers companies and the general public about nanomaterials JJ The unknown

    Original URL path: http://www.vincentcaprio.org/2011/06 (2016-05-02)
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  • Vincent Caprio's Blog Evolving Innovations » 2011 » May
    falling behind in vital areas like nanotech and cleantech Action is needed to catch up whether from the government or the private sector If the private sector is not doing it we should not be surprised if the government steps in or is at least asked to step in to fill the vacuum Venture capital for example may be attracted for business reasons to fund social media innovation but government can also help ensure that innovation in the physical and life sciences also occurs whether or not venture capital funds it SW Intellectual property is clearly an important area for nanotech What kinds of activity and trends are we seeing in nano related IP today SR For IP three lead topics include obtaining patents licensing patents and litigating patents We monitor each week the patents and patent publications emerging which are classified as 977 nanotechnology patents We are now approaching 7 000 class 977 patents and more importantly we have now over 8 000 published nanotech patent applications We monitor these patents to get a feel for the trends and the types of language used in the claims Many of these patents relate to electronics and semiconductors For instance companies like Samsung are filing in large volume Unfortunately fewer patents relate to pharma and biotech which is due to how the USPTO defines the classification One must go outside of 977 to monitor nanobio 977 is just a starting point I have been impressed by the broad balanced diversity of patent applicants populating 977 ranging from the Samsungs to the lone inventors from the universities to the mid sized companies and from the government labs to the VC backed start ups Nanotech patent licensing and litigation are alive and well from our experience Universities and federal laboratories continue to aggressively market their patent licensing and will face increasing pressure in coming years to show the government how the government funding for research is translating into jobs Many companies of course want to avoid litigation but if your product is valuable competitors will arise and IP disputes are almost unavoidable at some point there are so many patents out there Smart well managed companies aggressively manage the risks from the very start searching for and formulating strategy for competitive patents Some companies appear to just want to posture and litigation can t always be avoided New things seem to constantly come up For example we monitor deep shale gas drilling patenting and innovation including Marcellus shale which will have a profound impact Now nanotech patents are starting to appear in this innovation space Graphene Metamaterials Always something new SW You mentioned four areas of focus at F L Litigation Corporate Intellectual Property IP and Regulatory Let s discuss regulatory briefly Generally speaking how does the current regulatory environment for nanotech look from your perspective What are the hot topics for nanotech at the EPA and FDA today for example SR Much has been written about nanotech and EHS of course perhaps too much It seems as if more has been written than actually done Innovation tends to flow faster than and not wait for regulation The current climate for budget cutting and promotion of jobs tends to cool the fervor to regulate One topic that should receive more attention than it does is connecting innovation and regulation It can come in several flavors For example one form is innovation to facilitate nanotech regulation If you want to regulate exposure to nanoparticles how do you measure the exposure Is there a way to study nanomaterial toxicity without killing larger animals and minimizing animal rights concerns Other EHS technologies actively do something remedial As an example the Department of Energy recently filed a patent application 2011 0039291 related to bioremediation of nanomaterials EHS is best as an innovation growth area for the coming decade Inventions can help with or be required for the kinds of regulation we want and make sense The EPA is perhaps the most active agency and we have an active environmental regulation group which works with the EPA e g Foley lawyers Sarah Slack Dick Stoll and Steven Chester The EPA should be issuing TSCA nano related rules in 2011 including reporting obligations for manufacturers Another area of activity is regulation of certain public health claims about nanoscale products e g kill germs While we have an active FDA group e g Foley lawyers David Rosen and Nate Beaver the FDA has been seemingly less active with nanotech in recent years Some drug products and medical devices which incorporate nanoparticulate technology have been approved In FDA s discussion of looking ahead for the next five years the FDA recognizes they need to become more involved and keep abreast of new developments and emerging technologies like nanotech As for OSHA not much new for now in the bigger picture One never knows when a crisis might occur to profoundly change the EHS debate No one predicted too well the BP oil spill or the Japan nuclear crisis In the meantime we have slow evolution of regulatory dialog tempered by the need to allow business to grow in a sluggish economy SW With respect to the corporate services F L provides what types of services are most in demand today SR It crosses the gamut For example new emerging tech companies whether they are called nanotech or not are always forming expanding and preparing to take it to the next level such as the next financing round an IPO or being bought They need to be structured and financed through the changes They need grant money Employment matters come up Stock options Lobbying IP Complex agreement issues come up including supply agreements and technical advisory agreements are but some examples Etc Multi disciplinary teams are essential Finally international issues are key including China In particular our corporate lawyers in such offices as Boston and Silicon Valley are active in these areas e g Foley s Jim Chapman Susan Pravda Julie Lee

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  • Vincent Caprio's Blog Evolving Innovations » 2011 » April
    available adjuvants have poor safety profiles and the added complexity approaches with separate adjuvants increases cost In contrast Versamune safely acts as an adjutant activator itself has higher potency and is a simpler system They have completed preliminary animal trials incorporating a protein which targets human papilloma virus These trials showed striking remission of HPV associated head and neck tumors PDS plans to enter clinical trials with this drug candidate within a year followed by a related compound targeting melanoma in 2013 They have raised 11M in capital to date with minimal dilution and have received 5M in kind service contributions from NIH We shifted from therapeutic drugs to diagnostic testing with Moritz Beckmann CEO of XinRay Systems http www xinraysystems com XinRay a joint venture of UNC spinout Xintek and diagnostic powerhouse Siemens uses carbon nanotubes to build X ray emitters The compact rugged CNT based sources allow XinRay to build imaging systems that are not practical with traditional X ray generators which Beckmann compared to incandescent light bulbs in their sophistication and fragility XinRay designs use an array of emitters so the X ray beam can be steered electrically instead of swinging a single source mechanically Medical applications in development range from mammography to image guided radiotherapy in which rapid 3 D imaging is used to help surgeons place radioactive implants precisely in diseased tissue Future possibilities include dental imaging systems This 3 D imaging approach called tomosynthesis is a variant of computer aided tomographic CT scanning It trades off some resolution for speed reduced X ray exposure and low cost Non medical applications include airport baggage screening in development and non destructive testing of structural materials future Joel Friedman described his work building a nanobiotechnology center at Albert Einstein Medical College They are striving to create the kind of open collaborative research environment that once thrived at Bell Laboratories with a bench to bedside and back mission start with basic research on nanoparticles develop technologies to deliver diagnostics or therapies based on these particles and apply them in focused healthcare situations Then take the results right back to the basic research and iterate They presently have two technology thrusts each with multiple healthcare applications The first is hybrid materials combining hydrogels with glassy nanoparticle the second is gadolinium oxide nanoparticles and techniques for coating them with various substances Tony Green Director of The Nanotechnology Institute closed out the nanomedicine panel with a description of NTI s relationship with Ben Franklin Technology Partners As one of four independent regional entities in the Ben Franklin model NTI has been a leader in developing multi institutional IP agreements and moving university developed IP into companies They work with many partner companies in Southeastern Pennsylvania and beyond with restrictions in place to keep most of the money in state In the past few years the State has shifted more emphasis to funding clean energy following a very similar model while cutting back somewhat on their nanobio and other life science investments We rejoined our NanoBCA colleagues for lunch which included a keynote presentation from PhARMA CEO John Castellani The nano track continued afterward with Jeff Rosedale of Woodcock Washburn surveying the nanomedicine intellectual property landscape To get a big picture of the situation Jeff compared the U S Patent and Trademark Office s Nanotechnology Cross reference Class Class 977 with the A1 international class for medical patents He came up with 2 900 patents 2 300 of them independent in both classes Three out of four describe compositions of nanomaterials or methods for making them Diagnostic devices imaging devices bandages and stents were also common The largest patenters not surprisingly are big corporations Proctor and Gamble L Oreal and Elan The University of California is fourth Jeff used a few just issued patents to illustrate the true state of the art Last Tuesday s new announcement included the following 7 919 699 Nanotubes as mitochondrial uncouplers http patft uspto gov netacgi nph Parser Sect1 PTO2 Sect2 HITOFF p 1 u 2Fnetahtml 2FPTO 2Fsearch adv htm r 3 f G l 50 d PTXT S1 977 2F CCLS OS CCL 977 RS CCL 977 and 7 919 113 Dispersible concentrate lipospheres for delivery of active agents http patft1 uspto gov netacgi nph Parser Sect1 PTO2 Sect2 HITOFF p 1 u 2Fnetahtml 2FPTO 2Fsearch bool html r 1 f G l 50 co1 AND d PTXT s1 dispersible TI s2 concentrate TI OS TTL dispersible AND TTL concentrate RS TTL dispersible AND TTL concentrate from the University of Kentucky and Hebrew University respectively The UK patent is a variation on an 80 year old idea for altering metabolism with applications from weight loss to healing brain injuries While the basic mechanism is demonstrated it has been very difficult to control As in many other similar applications the inventors believe nanotechnology will give them the ability to fine tune the process safely Jeff continued that major pharma manufacturers do have nano patent portfolios including AstraZeneca s supercritical process for dispersing protein particles Bristol Myers Squibb s conjugated MRI contrast agents Ethicon s fluorescent markers to aid surgeons and Abbott s stent which eludes nanoparticles that are both bioactive and contrast enhancing so standard imaging techniques can see when the medicine has all eluted GE as might be expected has many nano patents throughout the biomedical imaging field But with all this activity only one set of patents has made it into the FDA orange book which lists patents of composition or method that are generally recognized as safe and effective That s Elan s TriCor portfolio which is based on ball milling far from a modern technology Moving on to patenting strategies Jeff suggested that inventors should generally focus more on what and less on how since competitors can often find a different way to make something Claim what they need to take steal from you And claim something that is verifiable i e that you can measure Rosedale reminded us that trademarks trade secrets and agreements can be just as important as patents Small companies in particular should be very sure that employees and consultants have proper agreements assigning rights to the company One good basic strategy for balancing these components is to patent your basic compositions consumables devices and tests while keeping non critical details and improvements as trade secrets When conflicting or overlapping IP claims appear what should a company do A good way to start is by asking a patent attorney for a freedom to operate study Their recommendations may range from licensing to requesting re examination of patents based on new found prior art to seeking a declaratory judgment invalidating a patent to as a last and expensive resort doing battle in court Our good friend Scott Livingston http www livingstonsecurities com about php followed Jeff with an update on the investment outlook Scott had just been in Boston for the annual meeting of the National Venture Capital Association which he said was the hottest in several years He met with leading partners from 20 major VC firms they are all looking to get their money working again in companies and IPOs are regaining favor The political landscape is also promising Scott noted President Obama s emphasis on innovation in the State of the Union address Secretary Geithner s recent travels to high tech companies including NanoMech and plenty of interest in innovation on the other side of the aisle he reminded us that the re emergent Newt Gingrich has a long history as a champion of innovation and friend of the NanoBCA Livingston Securities http www livingstonsecurities com expects to continue to be in upcoming quality IPO deals hoping to following on recent successes like Neophotonics and Gevo But business as usual on Wall Street is a risk The big investment firms are not focused on the needs of high tech companies and are pushing them too hard It is especially bad in healthcare Biotech deals are getting canceled or requiring companies to give up too many shares at too low a price leaving them underfunded and unhealthy He described Tesla s much talked about 2010 offering as a different model Sentiment was strong and highly mixed By offering friends and family deals to owners of their first generation Roadster or people on the waiting list they had 1 3 of their deal done with engaged investors before going to the big banks Scott sees small investment banks like Livingston Securities as playing a similar role for nanotech companies About 2 500 people are participating in Scott s investor network He is looking for more and more active members who will add to the group s collective smarts proselytize for innovation and increase its attractiveness to IPO dealmakers Scott has been hosting state level webinars around the country pushing regional connections Eventually he would like to move his company up from being the 3 4 or 5 firm on 100M dollar deals to leading 30M deals Governors senators and Presidential hopefuls will be cutting ribbons around the country for the next 18 months so Scott says get in now Harris and Harris http www tinytechvc com Chairman and CEO Doug Jamison gave us the VC perspective on the investment landscape While Doug continues to see some disarray in the community he is optimistic about the direction in which things are moving H H believes that as a publicly traded VC firm it offers investors a unique combination of liquidity transparency and multi industry exposure There are now 32 companies in the portfolio principally in cleantech electronics and healthcare H H is able to be more patient than traditional firms since it has permanent capital some exits are pushing 8 9 and even 10 years But the successes are starting to come BioVex was recently acquired by Amgen for 425M plus up to 575 in future performance payments Neophotonics completed a successful IPO in February A third exit is expected soon Harris and Harris portfolio has pipelines of early middle and late stage companies so this is just the beginning Doug agrees with Scott that smaller IPOs make sense for a lot of companies though in some fields healthcare for example there is the opposite problem the current median size for mergers and acquisitions 100M is not sufficient But he is not sure the NVCA really understands this or has a clue what to do about it H H s attitude is that you want to know who you are selling to when they make a Series A investment they already know who they would like to have involved in Series B Finally Doug reminded us that nanotechnology is succeeding with lots of product wins and plenty of interest in the business press Two examples Doug highlighted which you can buy now are Contour long life lithium carbon fluoride batteries and Sephora s Algenist skin cream utilizing alguronic acid from biofuel innovator Solazyme Algenist sold out in 8 minutes in its debut on QVC Sam Brauer of Nanotech Plus http www nanotechplus net brought the meeting in to the home stretch with his talk on the state of cancer diagnostics Sam pointed out that diagnostics are less than successful in today s approach to cancer nor are therapies successful for many cancers In fact the major advance against cancer in the last 50 years has been prevention most notably by reducing smoking Consider four of the most highly used screening diagnostics the pap smear mammogram prostate specific antigen test and colonoscopy Too often Pap smears come back negative when diseased cells are present Skilled clinicians seem to have lower false negative rates but this variability is a major problem PSA tests have the opposite problem antigen levels are often elevated even though no cancer is present Mammography also has a high false positive rate Among these common tests only colonoscopy is generally considered to have good accuracy and sensitivity but it is expensive and invasive Testing overall is about a 4 3B market We spend almost 10 times that much on chemotherapy drugs And about 80 if cancer deaths are from metastases which are not really addressed by the major diagnostic screens Can we do better by using targeted molecular diagnostics instead of broad screens The science supporting this approach has been developing for more than 30 years but may still be inadequate Over 400 genes are already known to be involved in malignancy and many researchers believe that all cancer related genes will be identified within 10 years But the pattern of gene expression in individual cancers is highly variable Dr James Heath for example found nearly as many expression patterns as he had patients in a study of the brain tumor known as glioblastoma Heath s conclusion is that we need protein screens rather than gene screens But this is a much less developed area In colon cancer for example only 3 proteins have been identified and none of them seems to be a driving force in the development of the disease There are particular areas where the path forward seems a little clearer such as leukemia where Sam cited a recent paper on resistance to the drug Gleevec that many researchers think provides a roadmap to understanding how the disease progresses But overall the field faces scientific obstacles and a challenging business environment Pharmaceutical companies show little interest in diagnostics which they see as less profitable than therapeutics They are also skeptical about providing diagnostics when appropriate companion therapies are not available While GE s Jeffrey Immelt foresees a shift of 250B from treatment to diagnosis over the next decade he seems to be in the minority among healthcare experts To make real progress business issues such as research for funding and payment models must be addressed along with technology issues such as the identification of reliable DNA based genetic or protein based disease markers and the development of inexpensive robust instruments for measuring them Our session closed with a summary dialogue between NanoBCA board members Steve Waite and Philip Lippel Steve reminded us that nanotechnology is built on scientific discoveries dating back to the early twentieth century with individual scientists and investors playing critical roles in turning research into innovative products Phil noted that some of the hype both positive and negative around nanotechnology seems to be in decline He expressed the hope that we are entering a phase where all stakeholders acknowledge that new technology development involves both benefits and risks and attempt to assess both realistically Thanks to all of our speakers and attendees for another successful event Our 10th Annual NanoBusiness Conference will be held at the Seaport World Trade Center http www ctnanobusiness org NanoBCA our conference boston 2011 in Boston MA on September 25 27th Our 2011 Annual Conference will be organized with our strategic partner The National Nanomanufacturing Network http www internano org and it will be a must attend event For speaking opportunities please send me your proposals and abstracts to vincent nanobca org Regards Vincent Caprio Serving the Nanotechnology Community for Over a Decade Executive Director NanoBusiness Commercialization Association 203 733 1949 vincent nanobca org www nanobca org www vincentcaprio org NanoBusiness Interview William Moffitt President CEO Nanosphere Posted on April 5th 2011 in Uncategorized No Comments In this month s interview we talk to William Moffitt President and Chief Executive Officer of Nanosphere Mr Moffitt became president and CEO of Nanosphere in 2004 Moffitt is a 30 year veteran of the diagnostics and medical device industry having spent the last 20 years developing novel technologies into products and solutions that have helped shape the industry and generate significant shareholder value Prior to Nanosphere he served as President and CEO of i STAT Corporation a developer manufacturer and marketer of diagnostic products that pioneered the point of care blood analysis market Moffitt led i STAT from an early stage private company through commercialization an IPO in 1992 and its acquisition by Abbott Laboratories in 2003 Prior to i STAT Moffitt held increasingly responsible executive positions from 1973 through 1989 with Baxter Healthcare Corporation a 7 billion manufacturer and distributor of healthcare products and American Hospital Supply Corporation a 3 5 billion diversified manufacturer and distributor of healthcare products which Baxter acquired in 1985 Mr Moffitt earned a B S in zoology from Duke University In our interview we discuss Nanosphere s diagnostics technology and the impact of nanotechnology on health care diagnostics We hope you enjoy the interview Steve Waite SW Thanks for taking time to speak with us today Bill I thought we would begin by discussing the current state of diagnostics technology What types of advances in diagnostics technology have we seen over the past decade WM We have seen three significant advances in diagnostics in recent years and with them the potential for real measurable improvements in patient treatment First continued discovery of new biomarkers for disease including genetic markers and gene expression ranging from RNA to protein markers These new biomarker discoveries help advance diagnostics and provide physicians and patients with clinically actionable information that can lead to better outcomes Second although the term personalized medicine created a significant degree of hype and early expectations there is great progress being made in understanding the mechanisms of action and genetic implications for various therapeutic agents This will result in a new era for the treatment and prevention of disease using therapies that are more appropriately targeted to an individual To paraphrase William Osler a father of modern medicine it is more important to know what patient a disease has than what disease a patient has Third new technologies have emerged that enable complex genetic and protein tests to be performed in virtually any health care setting thus enabling these new advances to be incorporated into mainstream medicine on a practical and cost effective basis SW What role is nanotechnology playing in advancing diagnostics in health care WM Breakthroughs in nanotechnology have enabled Nanosphere to

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  • Vincent Caprio's Blog Evolving Innovations » 2011 » March
    in rapid vaccine discovery from Harvard and Berkeley From MIT in the case of Cerulean and Visterra focused respectively on nanotech in cancer and pandemic flu And from Johns Hopkins in using nanotech to deliver drugs through mucus with MIT legend Bob Langer and his star protégé Justin Hanes in a new company called Kala which is Hawaiian for passageway SW Returning to the other piece of Lux s trilogy investment process what kinds of special situations have you invested in that you are enthused about JW The most interesting might be Everspin We were founding investors who approached Freescale Semiconductor which was previously Motorola Semi They were struggling with a huge debt load from private equity investors after a buyout And we made them an offer to spin out their entire advanced memory division which developed non volatile memory instant on memory and help free up their cash flow It was a win win for everyone and the company has been growing at triple digit percentages SW Nanotech is crucial to the future of semiconductors and electronics How does Lux Capital go about evaluating technologies and companies in this space JW The key particularly in a cyclical industry like semis is who actually is capturing the value There s also a secular component with the rise of Asia contract manufacturing and fab less models The only intelligent thing we felt we could do was to avoid the capital intensive businesses and invest after all the capital was invested at the trough of the cycle In three of our companies over 100 million was invested by either other investors or a corporate parent and we were able to invest at a valuation that was one tenth one quarter or one third capital invested and at a time when product was shipping and tech risk was eliminated These opportunities are rare but are almost surely to present themselves in energy and healthcare too SW It s been difficult in the venture capital space given the turmoil in financial markets over the past several years Do you see the pendulum swinging back in favor of venture capital in the years ahead JW I do I have a self serving bias here but VC has been the second worst performing asset class for the past decade save for the S P There has been a flood of capital out of equity capital markets into debt markets which has driven yields of bonds from governments to munis to corporate low and dividend yields of equities high What I think you re likely to see is a reversion of capital flows from debt markets into equities People and institutions and investment advisors will tire of earning 0 5 2 5 or 3 5 respectively on 2 10 or 30 year Treasuries Municipalities are likely to see serious headwinds and retirees who once thought these were tax advantaged vehicles to preserve capital will see them as capital confiscation and maybe even defaults My speculation would be capital flows first into large cap blue chip high quality dividend yielding US multi nationals almost like a Nifty Fifty of yesteryear Until that gets overdone Then investors are likely to seek high growth unlevered equities and that is exactly what creates a new issue IPO market For ten years investors have shunned stakes in high tech startups The Facebook Groupon Twitter Zynga phenomena are changing that with blue chip institutions clamoring to get allocations It s possible if not probable this trickles into broad demand for tech companies which tend to be good inflation hedges as technology is broadly deflationary force with non commoditized offerings and pricing power So if Fed printing or debasing our dollars to get out of debt leads to inflation one could see a resurgence of IPOs Meanwhile corporations have restructured balance sheets refinanced debt extending maturities and lowering coupons and have record amounts of cash on their balance sheets ripe for M A There is always a five year investment psychological bias everyone wants to be invested today where they should ve been five years ago and I think VC is ripe for five plus years of outperformance SW We ve seen IPO activity pick up over the past year Should we expect to see some nanotech IPOs in the near future JW Capital markets are setting themselves up for a reversion of capital flows out of bonds low yielding sovereigns munis corporate in the presence of a non zero inflationary risk and into equities First high quality multi national dividend yielding equities then high growth unlevered small and mid cap tech also a natural deflationary force against inflation risk from central bank paper printing It will be an IPO picker s market meaning I m skeptical we ll see wholesale sectors see a rising tide of investor demand but individual companies with either the fundamentals or overwhelming buzz a la current social media phenomenon of Facebook Groupon Twitter LinkedIn will see strong demand SW Looking ahead what are the key investment areas that Lux Capital will be focused on JW Two areas we re in thesis construction mode are what we call unmet needs for unmanned systems and distributed healthcare Both are about emerging technology shaking up both defense and demographic trends in the former and healthcare in the latter SW One last question for you Josh What have been the three biggest investment lessons you ve learned since co founding Lux Capital JW Not sure I can limit it to three but I d say that the only certainty is uncertainty every company is a roller coaster ride That being early is the same thing as being wrong That in tough investments deal terms can matter more than the price you pay and in great ones neither really matters That good investment team processes are as or more important than outcomes That people not technology are the single most important thing we invest in That human nature is a constant and greed

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