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  • The VVA Veteran
    America Boise Chapter 872 James Whedon Howe died November 14 2005 in Grove Oklahoma The cause of death is unknown He was born June 23 1941 in Escondido California Howe served in the U S Navy from 1959 to 1965 He was a member of Vietnam Veterans of America Grove Chapter 878 He was a retired pastor James J Justus Jr died recently in Kerrville Texas The cause of death is unknown He was born August 9 1946 A veteran of the Vietnam War he was a permanently hospitalized member of Vietnam Veterans of America Kerrville Chapter 863 William Kieffer died recently in Henderson Nevada The cause of death is unknown He was a veteran of the Vietnam War and a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America Mount Clemens Michigan Chapter 154 Dennis G Klein died June 8 2005 in Middletown New York The cause of death is unknown He was born August 18 1951 He served in the U S Marine Corps from August 1969 to April 1971 with a tour of duty in the Vietnam War Klein was an at large life member of Vietnam Veterans of America New York Charles W Lawhorn died recently in Eaton Ohio The cause of death is unknown He was born March 5 1948 and served in the U S Army during the Vietnam War He was a member of Vietnam Veterans of America Dayton Chapter 97 George E Marley died recently in Houston The cause of death is unknown He was born in Niagara Falls New York on March 24 1951 He served in the U S Marine Corps in Aviation Ordnance from April 1968 70 He was a member of Vietnam Veterans of America Houston Chapter 343 Jesse B Massey died in September 2005 in Athens Alabama The cause of death was heart failure He was born September 5 1949 and served in the U S Army from 1971 74 He was a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America Athens Chapter 511 Michael B Matney died October 2 2005 at the Ohio State University Medical Center A resident of Heath Ohio he died from cancer He was born April 25 1947 in Ironton Ohio Matney served in the U S Army in the Vietnam War with two tours of duty with the 5th Special Forces S O G He was the recipient of the Distinguished Service Cross the Silver Star the Bronze Star and six Purple Hearts He was a member of Vietnam Veterans of America Newark Ohio Chapter 55 Hubert McAlister died recently in Roseville Michigan The cause of death is unknown He was a veteran of the Vietnam War and a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America Mt Clemens Chapter 154 Patrick J McGarvey died September 26 2005 in Mays Landing New Jersey The cause of death is unknown He was a veteran of the Vietnam War and a member of Vietnam Veterans of America Somers Point Chapter 228 Danal Maurice Meza died September 7 2005 in Boulder City Nevada The cause of death was heart failure He was born November 26 1941 in New York City Meza served in the U S Army during the Vietnam War He was a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America Las Vegas Chapter 17 Christopher N Mike died recently in Superior Wisconsin The cause of death is unknown He was born July 15 1953 He was a veteran of the Vietnam War and an at large member of Vietnam Veterans of America Wisconsin Herman W Mims died in September 2005 in Athens Alabama The cause of death is unknown He was born May 3 1948 Mims served in the U S Army during the Vietnam War He was a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America Athens Chapter 511 Charles D Murray Jr died February 15 2005 in Montclair New Jersey from cancer He was born November 10 1948 in Newark He served in the U S Army from April 1969 to January 1971 In Vietnam he served from May 1970 to January 1971 with the Americal Division the 25th Infantry Division and the 3 18th Artillery Unit He was a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America Cedar Grove Chapter 510 Robert Nielsen died December 26 2003 in Waukesha Wisconsin The cause of death is unknown Nielsen was a veteran of the Vietnam War and a member of Vietnam Veterans of America Oconomowoc Chapter 635 Jerry M Nix died November 15 2005 in Comfort Texas The cause of death is unknown Nix was a veteran of the Vietnam War and a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America Fayetteville Tennessee Chapter 580 Jimmy L Perry died recently in Troy Ohio The cause of death is unknown He was born May 4 1952 Perry served in the U S Army during the Vietnam War He was a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America Dayton Chapter 97 Darryl L Petersen died July 8 2004 in Clinton Iowa The cause of death was Agent Orange related cancer He was born December 31 1939 and he was a veteran of the Vietnam War Petersen was an at large member of Vietnam Veterans of America Iowa Thomas B Price Sr died July 9 2005 in Pittsville Maryland The cause of death is unknown He was born November 10 1925 Price was a veteran of the Vietnam War and a member of Vietnam Veterans of America Princess Anne Chapter 624 Paul A Pulkkinen died December 15 2005 in Worcester Massachusetts He was born November 1 1946 in Gardner Massachusetts He served in the U S Army from September 1968 to April 1970 with a tour of duty in Vietnam Pulkkinen received the Purple Heart for wounds sustained in combat action He was a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America Auburn Chapter 554 Clayton C Chief Pyle died of pulmonary hypertension December 12 2005 in Bloomington Minnesota He was born September 5 1930 in Rockford Illinois He served in the U

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2006_01/taps.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • Breakthrough:Americans from the Ground Up
    ranks we have generals officers and enlisted men We gave aid to the Socialist Republic of Vietnam in their struggle for independence Just as you have established relationships with the Vietnamese we have established and maintain a relationship with the Vietnamese Embassy in Kiev The Vietnamese have expressed their appreciation for what we have done for them I would like to appeal to you for joint memoirs Retired Gen Vladimir Mikhailovich Zakoryukin was the first to offer his recollections I am very glad we are meeting today he said I only saw Americans from the bottom up from the ground looking up I was going to Hanoi in the North An F 4 Phantom started to strafe the road A lot of civilians were on the road As you can imagine it was all filled up with bicycles We were in a Jeep We were going very slowly All the populace got scared They scattered running for cover We Soviet specialists had special instructions Get out of the Jeep Stand next to it Show yourself We wore white shirts and dark trousers We were unarmed We had no documents no identification We had no weapons The Phantom made a pass I could see the pilot s face as he made a second pass I had the impression that he saw me I was terrified He was smiling He made holes with his machine gun 30 meters away The rounds ricocheted over my head The Soviet specialists were also great patriots The civilian population of Vietnam didn t have anything to protect them As friends of that country we were professors and teachers we helped them use our technology and they used it against you War is war Zakoryukin said As veterans we all acknowledge that we did our duty It is very pleasant to be with one another People of our age live basically in our memories the memories of all the good things we have done Professor Nikolay Shershnev is a veteran of the Vietnam War and professor at the University of Air Forces Ukraine Ministry of Defense In July 2005 Shershnev was asked by the commander of the university to review libraries and faculty holdings for information regarding American losses in Vietnam Currently he teaches students from Myanmar in the use of the old Soviet anti aircraft missile system Shershnev was accompanied by his teaching assistant who is fluent in English Shershnev offered the following remarks Despite the fact that we and the general are old we still work We work with Zenith anti aircraft missiles Every day we appear before students and cadets Over 250 years ago the famous Russian General Alexander Suvorov said The war is not over until the last casualty is buried We admire the American organization VVA who attempts to put a period to war by continuing to account for the missing so that they may be returned to their families and be given a proper burial I am engaged in writing a book about personal experiences It will be about what we did in Vietnam It will be called Heaven and Earth of Vietnam Now we are working on the illustrations We will give a copy of our new book to our American friends Maybe we will have an opportunity to work on a book together Here amongst us are missile men of various kinds professors political workers and those who pushed the button Someday we hope to meet with those among you who were pilots and airmen Shershnev yielded the floor to Yuri S Salumatin Next year it will be forty years since we returned he said I only saw the Americans on the radar screen But one time we did see a POW On August 1 1966 we had shot down many Americans He was a lieutenant colonel He was trying to get back to the airport in Thailand This was about midnight His captors were carrying burning torches My friend and I were out walking What is that That is a pilot Let s go look at him He had short hair We were two meters from him He was wearing only his underwear He was tied in ropes and there were bindings on his shoulders There was a stopped car It was not a pretty picture We couldn t sleep with that terrible picture in front of our eyes Later on we saw some American POWs in Haiphong They were working in a fish factory Anatoly Sokolov proudly proclaimed I am the only one here who took part in both wars World War II and Vietnam The terror and fear were much greater in World War II I was a commander of a field artillery unit then I marched from Moscow to the River Elbe where I met the Americans In the confusion we crossed the river We rejoiced in victory and celebration We hugged I was only 21 years old I will soon be 82 years old I corresponded for a while with my American friends but then I lost touch I went from field artillery to being a specialist in missiles It was my lot to fulfill my duty in Vietnam At the order of the Russian ambassador I took part in the interrogation of two American prisoners of war I was given the option of using force I did not use force I interrogated them about the Shrike Missile System I was chosen for the interrogation because I knew missile systems and I could ask for details that would be useful technologically It s been a long time I can t remember much What can I say The war in Vietnam did not have the same degree of danger as WWII but of course it was difficult Later over dinner Sokolov again spoke of the battlefield horrors of World War II and of that glorious day April 29 1945 when he met up with his American allies at the River Elbe He was among the

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2006_01/featureVVKharkiv.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • New Evidence on the Gulf of Tonkin
    scene sent a dispatch that called into question his own action reports without any impact on Washington s decisions Johnson officials staunchly insisted that its accounts of both incidents were true The general verdict of history has been that the August 2 battle indeed took place but that the second incident was a fiction Even the author of the Navy s official history of the Vietnam War covering this period who followed the Johnson script now concedes the inaccuracy of claims for the night of August 3 The last holdouts among those who sided with the Johnson administration s version of events relied upon the NSA intercept evidence to buttress their position The significance of the new declassifications is that they make the full range of intercept evidence available for the first time It turns out that the claims originally based on the communications intelligence used only a handful of the NSA intercepts and they were selectively culled from a much wider array of material This fact is illuminated in considerable detail in a lengthy paper by NSA historian Robert J Hanyok which also is among the newly released documents Intercepts used by then Secretary of Defense Robert S McNamara to defend the official version of events in 1968 and 1969 investigations have long been contested and actually do reflect the events of August 2 rather than the alleged second incident That was the view of NSA deputy director Louis Tordella CIA senior official Ray Cline the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and many historians The new material also reveals these startling facts Only one of four relevant NSA intercept stations took in the message that became central to the debate while one of the other stations reported a version of the same dispatch that did not sustain the inference that an attack was taking place Washington officials relied upon the times at which NSA transmitted the intercepted and translated messages to place them within the timeframe of the alleged attack rather than the times at which North Vietnamese radio operators had originated the messages which were before any of the alleged events were occurring The Vietnamese language original of the key message in which a phrase was subject to interpretation hurt sailors versus damaged boats had disappeared from the files even though NSA practice typically included plaintext at the end of a message as a technical assistance feature Two of the five points of the administration argument for the veracity of events relied upon this message All the others were based on alleged radar sonar or visual observations that were increasingly disputed Confusion over whether a particular radio call sign referred to an individual boat or a unit permitted further distortion to occur NSA headquarters reports combined elements of different messages without the acknowledgment that was standard procedure to issue a summary containing the starkest possible rendering of available information The vast majority of NSA intercepts for August 3 conveyed a picture of a quiet North Vietnamese naval communications net

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2006_01/featureTonkin.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran®-The Official Publication of VVA
    s War New VVA Prez Rowan Fights to Defend Extend Veterans Rights Ace Lundon Pendleton Producer A Job Well Done Chapter 685 s Scholarship Program Port of Entry Sihanoukville Missing Found VVA s Rochester Honor Guard at The Wall Ten years ago a POW MIA Marathon Team ran from Rochester New York to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial more Ordered Into Madness The Military Use of Larium On August 9 2005

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_11/ (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran
    own organization so that they can pick up where we may leave off But that does not mean we have completed our mission There is much to be done since it appears that veterans benefits are under attack While the CARES Commission s work may yield a positive result it seems that the driving force is to downsize veterans healthcare The Veterans Disability Benefits Commission has just begun its work but there are also concerns that its focus may be to cut back benefits As for Congress initial attempts to rein in the VA healthcare budget as a cost cutting measure had to give way to the realities of the cost of care especially since we are creating a whole new generation of veterans that will need the VA s services It s therefore more important than ever that all of us each member chapter state council the CSCP the National Board of Directors and officers form a united front to defeat these attempts to turn veterans into welfare recipients If the recent response by all levels of VVA to the disaster relief effort for Hurricane Katrina is any example I have no doubt that our effort on behalf of veterans rights will be successful So while VVA as an organization may not be able to retire I know that many of our members will or may already have retired If you are retired I urge you to join us in our fight Below my message is a help wanted ad of sorts We are looking for veterans with particular skills and affiliations who are willing to help in our programs We can t pay you but the work will be rewarding We won t even ask you to leave your home Modern communications will allow you to participate through

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_09/president.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran
    have been referred to the regional office of original jurisdiction for corrective action The VA has advised its public affairs people that where deficiencies are identified it will do everything possible to work with the veterans to obtain the evidence needed and that it is likely that in order to correct the deficiencies in stressor documentation or to support the 100 percent disability evaluation assigned some veterans will be asked to provide additional information and or report for another psychiatric reexamination It is worth noting that the VA has a legal obligation to assist veterans proactively in this regard what is known as the duty to assist law The VA has chosen thus far not to confer or consult with the VSOs even though the IG noted that veterans represented by VSO representatives had awards that were 68 percent higher than those who relied on the VA personnel for help A reasonable person could conclude that the VSO representatives were generally better at this process or had more time to do their jobs properly The VSOs perhaps could be very helpful in improving this process making it more accurate and fair to the veteran while insuring that a valid claim has been fully developed Useful that is if accurate and fair adjudication is the real intent of this review In a June 14 letter to VA regional office directors VA Undersecretary Cooper instituted a policy that any claims decisions that involve a grant of service connection for PTSD a grant of a 100 percent rating according to the VA rating schedule for any condition or a grant of a total evaluation based upon individual unemployability must be approved by the primary adjudicator and a concurring second adjudicator On June 21 several members of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs sent a letter to VA Secretary Nicholson to express concern about this second signature review requirement The House Committee on Veterans Affairs echoed a point that VVA leadership and staff have made to the VA Congress and the media on many occasions If the VA is so concerned that its adjudicators have made so many errors in granting PTSD awards why is the VA not investigating all of its denials of benefits in claims for PTSD to see if its adjudicators were equally mistaken in denying entitlement to benefits Shortly after the Committee s letter the VA rescinded the Undersecretary s directive and is proceeding with a more limited review VVA S RESPONSE VVA has been monitoring PTSD awards review since the issuance of the IG report We have communicated with top VA officials members of Congress and their staffs our fellow VSOs and legal consultants to express our dismay at this process and to explore responses President John Rowan and the Board of Directors are determined that VVA will successfully lead this struggle to insure equitable treatment for veterans suffering from PTSD as well as other conditions due to their military service VVA at this point has a four tiered plan First VVA will publicize the review and our concerns about it to our members to veterans and their families to veterans advocates and to the public through press releases The VVA Veteran our website and outreach to our nationwide network of accredited veterans service representatives We will also provide suggestions as to what can be done to stop the current VA review or insure that damaging results are limited Second VVA will continue its efforts to work with Congress to curtail an attempt to use this review as a pretext to cut spending for VA benefits and health care The IG report went far afield from the stated purpose to recommend lump sum payments to veterans to eliminate further liability of the government for compensation or treatment as well as to claim that veterans who receive 100 percent ratings just stop seeking treatment Most shamelessly the VA is aware that the furor over this issue will cast a chilling effect on returning Iraq and Afghanistan veterans from seeking treatment or filing legitimate claims for PTSD Congress should conduct hearings and investigate this process thoroughly before the VA proceeds Rep Steven Buyer R Ind chair of the House Veterans Affairs Committee has scheduled a hearing for late September Third VVA will continue to work with the other VSOs to present a unified front to the administration and Congress with respect to our concern over the potential for abuse to this process All veterans are against claims that are fictitious But all evidence indicates that those are very few in number In fact the IG report raised the possibility of fraud in only 12 of the 2 100 cases reviewed This is hardly a finding that justifies the innuendo in the IG report That is less than six tenths of one percent hardly cause for a wholesale meat cleaver approach to this issue Fourth VVA will pursue all legal options VVA has arranged with the National Veterans Legal Services Program NVLSP for the review of any VA decision either to sever or reduce benefits based upon the VA s audit of PTSD related awards Meritorious cases will be appealed to the Board of Veterans Appeals and if warranted to the federal courts We also are consulting with NVLSP and other attorneys concerning the feasibility of other possibly preemptive legal action including equitable relief in the form of a restraining order NATIONAL VIETNAM VETERANS LONGITUDINAL STUDY More than five years ago Congress mandated that the VA replicate the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study NVVRS by returning to the same veterans and control groups who participated in that study 20 years ago and look at their psychosocial and physical status today The replication of the study using the same participants as 20 years ago is called the National Vietnam Veterans Longitudinal Study and will tell us much about the long term effects of PTSD in regard to mental and physical health as well as overall psychosocial readjustment over time The VA canceled its

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_09/gov.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran-Agent Orange Committee Report
    who died from leukemia attributed to exposure to Agent Orange helped focus attention on the health issues associated with dioxin Gordon Seller was no ordinary soldier Before his death he had been Director General of Canadian Land Forces In the wake of General Seller s death almost 700 applications for monthly disability pensions have been filed with Canadian Veterans Affairs To date four applications have been approved Two of these are related to exposure to the defoliant at Gagetown two others have been granted to Canadians who served in Vietnam According to an account reported by the Associated Press the son of a deceased soldier believes that exposure to dioxin is responsible for the death of his father We re seeing entire families wiped out by cancers brain disorders and bowel disorders Kenneth Dobbie of Ottawa said They all have the same common thread They were all at Gagetown in the 1960s and 70s In New Zealand part of the town of New Plymouth may be sitting an a secret toxic waste dump containing Agent Orange According to a former top official at the Ivon Watkins Dow chemical factory in New Plymouth Dow owned land very close to the chemical plant which we called the Experimental Farm We bulldozed big pits and dumped thousands of tons of chemicals there The official whose identity was confirmed but who insisted on remaining anonymous told a reporter that people who d served in the armed forces made a strong case for the need to defoliate the jungle because of the risk to servicemen from ambush or sniper fire from the undergrowth So we began manufacturing this Agent Orange but it didn t meet the international specifications and probably had an excess of nasties in it The problem was we didn t consider the

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_09/AO.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran
    Board of Directors to make things better for VVA and the membership in the next two years President John Rowan has a big job ahead of him but if we all work together we can make VVA a very strong VSO I would like to thank Region 7 for electing me to my fourth term I will continue visiting all State Council meetings as I have done in the past and finding ways to improve our region In the next two years I will give an award to the Region 7 Pointman of the Year in each state It is time we recognize our members for their work Chapter 751 of Lawton Oklahoma has done a great job this year holding a Welcome Home for all the soldiers returning from Iraq In May the Arkansas National Guard had a big Welcome Home for their troops in Little Rock and asked Chapter 751 to attend The chapter was recognized for all its hard work This was a great honor for the chapter Region 7 is proud of you Chapter 278 did an excellent job holding the Region 7 Conference in Texarkana Texas in July We heard from seven candidates running for

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_09/region7.htm (2016-02-16)
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