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  • The VVA Veteran-AVVA Report
    and Afghanistan We also donated a walker to a wounded veteran who was recuperating at Walter Reed We continue working with families of the wounded from those conflicts donating coats and teddy bears to the families I encourage all AVVA chapters to work hard on membership It s equally important to retain old members and recruit new ones Together Always 2005 AVVA Annual Fellowship Award BY JUDY BOLIO It is again time to consider nominations for the Fellowship Award to be presented at the AVVA Leadership Conference in Reno in August Past recipients were recognized for their work for veterans and their country We in AVVA want the Fellowship Award to remain a prestigious honor Honorees who have received the Fellowship Award in the past three years are Marge and Loren Herrick John Kahler and Lynda Greene Nancy and Charlie Montgomery Kate Pantorello Janis Roznowski The award goes to individuals who go one step beyond The requirements for nominations are 1 Applicant must be a current member in good standing of AVVA with no pending disciplinary actions 2 Applications must be postmarked no later than June 10 3 Applications must include a report of no less than one page but no more than two pages describing the individual s attributes and accomplishments 4 Application must include documents or articles that reinforce your submission 5 The Awards Committee is responsible for the selections All submissions will remain the sole property of the Awards Committee until the AVVA Leadership Conference is closed at which time submissions will be stored at the national office in Silver Spring Maryland 6 Submissions should be sent to Judy Bolio Awards Committee Chair 326 16th Ave Silvis IL 61282 1809 Election Report BY KATHY ANDRAS We are preparing for Affiliated Chapter and State Representative elections The candidates applying for these positions must be aware of the tremendous responsibility that they will be assuming Until now elections for the Affiliated Chapter Representatives were held annually in April It is now up to AVVA members affiliated with VVA chapters to decide if they would like to have elections every two years or keep their elections every year Whichever they choose the State Representative should be notified Candidates must be at least 21 years old and a member in good standing in AVVA with no pending disciplinary action Each candidate must provide a letter of intent to the person in charge of running the election no later than 60 days prior to the election The forms requirements and duties of the office of the Affiliated Chapter Representative are found in the AVVA Policy and Procedure Manual Section Seven This is the year for State Representative elections They are held in odd numbered years with the elections taking place between January 1 and June 30 The candidate must be 21 years of age and either an at large regular member or a regular member affiliated with a VVA chapter To qualify you must have been a member for at least one

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_05/avva.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran
    the April Board of Directors meeting to review all proposed amendments and prepare its report to the membership That report will be made available via e mail the VVA web site and postal mail within two weeks following the April meeting The committee also will hold open hearings at the Convention before the amendments are presented to the delegates for action We encourage everyone to attend the hearing and to

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_03/constitution.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran
    date of the opening of the National Convention at which such candidate seeks election Candidates for At large and Regional Board of Directors must meet the requirements to hold office as set down in the VVA National Constitution Article I Section 4 Paragraph B 1 and 2 for Regional Directors and Article I Section 4 Paragraph B 1 and 3 for At Large Directors as revised August 1 2003 To wit To qualify for election a candidate must have been a member of the Corporation in good standing for a continuous period of not less than the twelve months immediately preceding the opening of the National Convention at which candidate seeks election The candidate must have held an elected position at the national state or chapter level for any continuous period of twelve months prior to the date of the opening of the National Convention Candidates for Regional Board positions must reside within the region they wish to represent IMPORTANT NOTE Those who plan to run for an elected position from the floor at the Convention cannot distribute any campaign materials or announce or campaign on any web site including their own or accept any authorized contributions prior to being approved as a candidate by the Election Committee at the Convention Any violation of the above will result in disqualification CANDIDATE S PACKETS The Election Committee will mail Candidate s Packets to candidates who have submitted Letters of Intent To avoid possible loss or destruction of these packets they will be sent via Certified Mail Return Receipt Requested These packets contain information instructions and rules regarding the conduct of the election process that are of vital importance to every candidate Included in these packets will be some forms Candidates are required to complete the forms and return them to the Election Committee NOTE The Candidate s Packet will include a Cut off Date Calendar that lists events and dates that are very important to each candidate s campaign for office Failure to meet any of the deadlines will be grounds for disqualification CONDUCT OF CAMPAIGNS Candidates may not use the VVA national logo or flag nor that of any State Council or Chapter in or on their campaign materials Campaign materials are considered to be but are not limited to buttons pins brochures and the like A photograph of a candidate wearing his or her VVA National State Council or Chapter lapel pin is acceptable Additionally a photograph of a candidate who is wearing a coat jacket shirt or hat that has a VVA National State Council or Chapter logo on it also is acceptable Candidates may not solicit or accept campaign contributions in any form from VVA or any VVA State Council or Chapter Campaign contributions are considered to be but are not limited to money paper envelopes postage free printing free phone calls use of web sites or e mail Candidates may not solicit or accept any campaign endorsement from VVA any VVA State Council Chapter or VVA

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_05/elections.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • Taps: Coping Skills For Widows
    My world stopped It was a struggle just to get up in the morning I think we have a hard time comprehending that someone we love can be gone so quickly Carroll said She spent six months trying to cope with the tremendous loss Then on Memorial Day 1993 six months after her husband s death Carroll gathered with other women who d lost husbands in the same crash That was the first time we d run into each other since the incident happened she recalled Afterwards we went out for coffee We cried and laughed shared our feelings and our struggles It was so amazing so healing to have your own experiences normalized and validated That coffee shop experience convinced Carroll to take action Although psychologists and psychiatrists advise against making big changes during the first year following a loved one s death one of the first things many military families must do is move from base housing into the civilian community Moreover military survivors have to change their identification cards as a result of death There are so many things that make death in the military unique she said And it s not so much about the circumstances of their death as it is about the life they lived in service to our country My role as an Army wife stopped on the day my husband died It was another loss I felt and mourned Before her husband s death Carroll said she was very much involved in the Army family Once he was gone people still invited her to take part in the activities of the military community but it was in a different context I became an unmarried widow she said It is a matter of someone saying you are no longer who you were you

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_05/feature_CopingSkills.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran
    is required by the nominee s professional or organizational position The Chapel Awards Committee must approve all nominations Please be as specific as possible and include the nominee s full name chapter affiliation if applicable address and telephone number NOMINATIONS FOR THE HUMANITARIAN AWARD Only the National President a member of the National Board of Directors or a State Representative of Associates of Vietnam Veterans of America or the National President a member of the National Board of Directors or a State Council President of Vietnam Veterans of America may nominate a worthy individual NOMINATING REQUIREMENTS In no more than four paragraphs describe the nominee s selfless sacrificial service In all cases the service must go far above and beyond that which is normally required in the course of human experience Supplementary documentation news articles letters of endorsement substantiation of other awards etc is required for all nominations All nominations must be approved by the Chapel Awards Committee which subjects all nominations to a rigorous review process Please be as specific as possible and include the nominee s full name chapter affiliation if applicable address and telephone number The National Presidents of AVVA and VVA shall be advised of the names and credentials of those nominated for this recognition NOMINATIONS FOR THE BRONZE MEDALLION Only the National President or a member of the National Board of Directors of Associates of Vietnam Veterans of America and Vietnam Veterans of America may nominate a worthy individual for The Bronze Medallion In no more than one page describe the nominee s contributions to world peace the well being of mankind or to interfaith and interethnic tolerance In all cases the efforts cited must go greatly above and beyond that which is normally required in the course of human experience as well as alter

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_05/4chaplains.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran
    no later than June 10 At the Convention committee hearings will be held to allow the committees task forces and delegates to review all resolutions pertaining to that particular committee or task force before the resolutions are presented to the delegates on the Convention floor The 2005 Convention Resolutions Committee is chaired by Fred Elliott The other members are Darrol Brown Region 9 Director Lee Fisher At large Director Ned

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_05/resolutions.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran- Arts of War
    final days and hours before it fell along with North Vietnamese footage of its army on the march southward For more on the series go to www pbs org wgbh amex vietnam MEMORIAL NEWS Thanks go to Roger A McGill of Chapter 242 in Chicago who wrote to let us know that Vietnam veterans can help choose which piece of art will be part of the new Chicago Vietnam Veterans Memorial due to be dedicated on Veterans Day 2005 at Wabash Plaza along the Chicago River To see a rendering of the memorial go to www nvvam org That s the web site of Chicago s National Vietnam Veterans Art Museum While you re there you can vote for one of five works of art that have been chosen as worthy to be part of the new memorial which will feature the work of Vietnam veteran Gary Tillery For more info on the sculptor go to www garytillery com In early February sculptor Rolf Kriken began making repairs to the bronze sculptures that grace the California Vietnam Veterans Memorial near the state capitol in Sacramento Kriken made the sculptures when the memorial was built in 1988 The memorial contains the names of more than 5 800 Californians who died in the Vietnam War Dennis E Rindone of Erving Mass has spent the last nine years photographing researching and documenting veter ans memorials in 351 Massachusetts towns and cities Photos of more than sixty Massachusetts veterans memorials may be found on his website www honorrollofliberty com ARTS IN BRIEF The demise of the hit ABC TV show NYPD Blue after a dozen seasons marked the end of weekly appearances by noted Vietnam veteran actor Dennis Franz who portrayed a notable Vietnam veteran character Detective Andy Sipowicz Franz earned widespread acclaim including four Emmys for his portrayal of the hard bitten Sipowicz Not bad for a guy with a face that looks as if it were carved out of potatoes and the body style of a greeter at Home Depot as The New York Times described the actor Among the cultural events marking April s 30th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War was Larry Burrows War and Peace an exhibit of the photographs of the famed Life magazine photographer who took many memorable images of the war and who was killed in a 1971 helicopter crash over Laos The exhibit was on view at New York City s Laurence Miller Gallery Vietnam The Next Generation a documentary by Sandy Northrop that looks at eight young Vietnamese people was broadcast on PBS stations nationwide on the Independent Lens series on Tuesday May 17 Northrop has made two other PBS documentaries on the war Pete Peterson Assignment Hanoi and Vietnam Passage Journeys from War to Peace For more info on her latest film go to www pbs org independentlens vietnam If you are in Washington between now and Veterans Day be sure to head over to the Women in Military Service for

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2005_05/arts.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • The VVA Veteran
    and its aftermath presidential power the role of the courts and the press government secrecy are all still with us And this book throws fresh and important light on the issues John Prados and Margaret Porter call themselves its editors because they include comments from participants in the events But they really are authors also providing a running account and analysis that goes beyond what has been written before They begin with a description much of it new at least to me and fascinating of how the papers were prepared in the Pentagon In 1967 Secretary of Defense Robert S McNamara by then beginning to have doubts about the war told one of his military assistants Lieutenant Colonel Robert G Gard that he wanted a thorough study done of the background of the Vietnam War Gard brought in a former Senate staff member with a Harvard Ph D Leslie H Gelb as director of the project The idea at first was to put together a collection of documents on the war Gelb added a series of studies on what the documents meant McNamara wanted answers to hard questions Are we lying about the number of the enemy killed Can we win the war To do the studies Gelb hired experts some from within the Pentagon including military officers and some from the RAND Corporation and other outside institutions Each wrote about a period in the war s history Prados and Porter include contributions from a number of the study s authors in their book An especially interesting one is by Melvin Gurtov who came from RAND and did the study on the years from the end of World War II and the French return to Indochina to the Geneva Conference of 1954 at which Vietnam was partitioned He offers some general conclusions he draws from the Pentagon Papers The crux of these documents Gurtov writes was what they revealed about the duplicity of U S leaders who consistently lied to the American people the Congress and the press about many aspects of the war in the Kennedy and Johnson years Presidents and their national security advisers knew the war was being lost knew their Vietnamese opponents had popular support while their allies in Saigon did not and knew that military firepower was no substitute for political legitimacy But they told the American people the opposite Gurtov also praises Daniel Ellsberg for getting the papers to the public It was an act of great courage Gurtov says to which I would add one for which Ellsberg paid a heavy price in right wing attacks unaffected by the realities of the losing war in Vietnam A second section of Inside the Pentagon Papers considers what happened inside The New York Times Neil Sheehan of its Washington bureau who had been one of the remarkable young correspondents in Vietnam got the Pentagon Papers from Daniel Ellsberg Altogether there were forty seven volumes four thousand pages of documents and three thousand of the accompanying studies But Ellsberg withheld four volumes on peace negotiations neither the Times nor any other newspaper ever had those In the forty three volumes there was a thread the United States had consistently professed support for a unified independent Vietnam but just as consistently aided France in opposing Vietnamese independence sabotaged the Geneva agreement for national elections and so on Sheehan spent two weeks in a Washington hotel reading the papers before on April 20 describing them to the managing editor of the Times A M Rosenthal Sheehan and other reporters were then secretly installed in a suite in the New York Hilton with a guard at the door to prepare for possible publication But whether the Times would publish was still an open question The reporters and editors who were in on the secret all pressed for publication That included Rosenthal even though Hedrick Smith another Times reporter involved in the project says in this book that Rosenthal personally favored the Vietnam War journalism was what mattered But some executives of the paper were opposed and so was the law firm that had long represented the Times Lord Day Lord Details of the debate inside the Times were first published in Sanford Ungar s 1972 book The Papers and the Papers The Times Washington bureau chief Max Frankel frustrated by the lawyers respect for secrecy stamps wrote a memorandum arguing persuasively that military diplomatic and political reporting always used secret material The memorandum was later filed as an affidavit in the court case On the other hand it was not customary for the Times to use material from such an enormous breach of classification rules related to a war that was still going on That was what gave the Times s publisher Arthur Ochs Sulzberger a former U S Marine pause But in the end he decided in favor of publication On the evening of the second day of publication June 14 Attorney General John N Mitchell sent a telegram to the Times saying that the Pentagon Papers series violated a criminal statute the Espionage Act He asked the Times to stop and to return these documents to the Department of Defense Again there was conflict inside the Times about whether to comply Sulzberger was in London on a long planned trip reached there he ordered publication to continue A five column headline in the Times on Tuesday morning said Mitchell seeks to Halt Series on Vietnam But Times Refuses According to Ungar Rosenthal said later If the headline had been Justice Department Asks End to Vietnam Series and Times Concedes I think it would have changed the history of the newspaper business James Reston the Washington columnist and former executive editor was the most respected figure on the paper His position on the Pentagon Papers shows how things had changed Reston had had many scoops as a reporter but he had customarily worked with officials He knew about U 2 flights over the Soviet Union for years but wrote nothing about them until one of the planes was downed in 1960 Now he pressed for publication of the Vietnam series If the Times did not publish he said at one meeting he would publish the Pentagon Papers in the Vineyard Gazette the Martha s Vineyard weekly that he owned A similar debate took place inside The Washington Post when it got much of the Pentagon Papers material after the Times was enjoined from continuing to publish The editors wanted to go with the story Financial executives especially concerned because the Post was about to put its stock on the public market for the first time were opposed Katharine Graham the publisher made the decision to publish Don Oberdorfer a longtime Post foreign and diplomatic correspondent contributes his recollections to this book The decision to publish he concludes made the Post a newspaper to be taken seriously by the informed It made it easy for the Post to go with the Watergate stories a year later All told Oberdorfer says the Pentagon Papers had a signal effect on the press It was the moment at which newspapers became independent of the government on the war Why were editors and publishers who had worked with presidents on national security disclosures the Times holding off for example on its knowledge of the Cuban missile crisis now not telling officials what they had Why had the Times gone so far to keep its secret from the government that it had its reporters working in a guarded hotel suite The Vietnam War is a large part of the answer But I also think the lack of trust in Richard Nixon and his people mattered Would the Times and the Post have done the same if John F Kennedy had been president Next Prados and Porter describe what went on in the White House Some of the material has been disclosed before but it is wonderful to have the quotations from President Nixon and his aides gathered here in all their morbid splendor On the morning of the first day June 13 Nixon told his chief of staff H R Haldeman that the administration should keep clear of the Times series which after all focused on previous administrations But shortly after noon Alexander Haig his deputy national security adviser telephoned to give Nixon the latest Vietnam casualty figures Then he spoke of the goddamn New York Times exposé of the most highly classified documents of the war It was he said a devastating security breach In mid afternoon Henry Kissinger the national security adviser telephoned He discussed several important matters including the Vietnam peace negotiations in Paris Nixon raised the Times story Kissinger at first said it would if anything help us a little bit because this is a gold mine of showing how the previous administration got us in there and pins it all on Kennedy and Johnson But Nixon evidently reflecting Haig s comment said that the bastards that put it out had done something treasonable Kissinger reversed himself It s treasonable he said there s no question By the next day Kissinger was in a rage about the Pentagon Papers He told Charles Colson according to Colson s memoir There can be no foreign policy in this government no foreign policy I tell you We might just as well turn it all over to the Soviets and get it over with These leaks are slowly and systematically destroying us According to Haldeman s memoir Kissinger told him that Daniel Ellsberg had weird sexual habits used drugs and enjoyed helicopter flights in which he would take potshots at the Vietnamese below Haldeman reckoned that Kissinger was trying to ward off attacks from Nixon because he knew Ellsberg and Nixon already suspected Kissinger s staff as a source of leaks Nixon suspected Kissinger as well In a taped conversation with Haldeman on June 14 Nixon said Henry talked to that damn Jew Frankel all the time In his memoir The White House Years Kissinger says his strong reaction against the T imes series was based on fear that it would upset the approach to China which was being negotiated at that time with his secret trip to Beijing to follow Our nightmare at that he writes was that Peking might conclude our government was too unsteady too harassed and too insecure to be a useful partner The massive hemorrhage of state secrets was bound to raise doubts about our reliability in the minds of other governments friend and foe and indeed about the stability of our political system There is no evidence that Mao Zedong cared about the Pentagon Papers John Ehrlichman second only to Haldeman among Nixon s assistants thought Kissinger was responsible for Nixon s decision to act against the Times Without Henry s stimulus Ehrlichman said the President and the rest of us might have concluded that the Papers were Lyndon Johnson s problem not ours Next came the legal battle Lord Day Lord advised that the government would bring a criminal prosecution Indeed its lawyers refused to look at what the Times had lest they be prosecuted under the Espionage Act But the Times s general counsel James Goodale an early and strong advocate of publication said correctly that what the paper had to expect and fear was an injunction to stop publication That this was the government s strategy was made clear by an assistant attorney general Robert Mardian in a telephone call to the Times that Monday evening June 13 Goodale telephoned Lord Day Lord to have a lawyer in court the next morning But its senior partner Herbert Brownell Jr said the firm would not represent the Times He gave as a reason that as attorney general in the Eisenhower administration he had written the basic executive order on classification an explanation that convinced no one Goodale in a comment in this book says that Attorney General Mitchell had telephoned Brownell and told him in effect that it would not be good for the Republican Party if he took part in the case Goodale then turned to Professor Alexander M Bickel of the Yale Law School reaching him about midnight Bickel agreed to argue for the Times and was at the federal courthouse in Foley Square the next morning By lot the spinning of a wheel by the court clerk the case was assigned to a new judge Murray Gurfein in his first day on the job That evening Attorney General Mitchell told Nixon that Gurfein was new and uh he s appreciative Ten minutes later in a telephone conversation with Secretary of State William Rogers Nixon said that Gurfein might be thinking of promotion which would be up to the president Mitchell and Nixon could not have been more wrong about the corruptibility of Murray Gurfein Times lawyers were concerned because he had been a military intelligence officer But if that played any part in Gurfein s attitude it was to make him skeptical demanding that the government s lawyers point to something potentially dangerous in the Pentagon Papers Government counsel at first would not cite dangerous passages Their strategy was to seek an all out victory a judicial decision that publication of highly classified documents was impermissible without any particularized examination of their content But Judge Gurfein kept asking for particulars On that first day Tuesday he granted a temporary restraining order that stopped publication On Friday the Post began publishing The same day Judge Gurfein held a day long hearing on whether to follow his temporary restraint of the Times with a longer lasting injunction Bickel told the judge about the Washington Post story and said The Government s position in this court your Honor was that grave danger to the national security would occur if another installment of a story that the Times had were published Another installment of that story has been published The Republic stands And it stood the first three days The next day Saturday Judge Gurfein rejected the government s call for an injunction His opinion included an eloquent passage that the authors use as an epigraph for this book A cantankerous press an obstinate press a ubiquitous press must be suffered by those in authority in order to preserve the even greater values of freedom of expression and the right of the people to know The Times lost in the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit which reversed Judge Gurfein The Post won in the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit On Friday morning June 25 the Supreme Court granted review in both cases setting argument for the next morning at 11 There was one crucial moment in the argument Justice Potter Stewart asked Professor Bickel this question Let us assume that when the members of the court go back and open up this sealed record we find something there that absolutely convinces us that its disclosure would result in the sentencing to death of 100 young men whose only offense had been that they were 19 years old and had low draft numbers What should we do Bickel said there should be a statute authorizing injunctions in specific terms the absence of one had been a main theme of his argument But Justice Stewart persisted Suppose there was no relevant statute You would say the Constitution requires that it be published and that these men die is that it Bickel gave an answer that troubled some First Amendment purists but that may have won the case for the newspapers No Bickel said I am afraid that my inclinations to humanity overcome the somewhat more abstract devotion to the First Amendment in a case of that sort The Supreme Court decided the cases on June 30 just fifteen days after the litigation began in Judge Gurfein s courtroom It was not as often assumed a clear victory for the First Amendment Justices Hugo L Black and William O Douglas took a seemingly absolute view that the First Amendment bars injunctions against the press Justice William J Brennan Jr said only proof that publication must inevitably directly and immediately have disastrous consequences could justify even an interim restraining order Justice Thurgood Marshall agreed with Bickel that there was no statute authorizing this kind of injunction and said it was up to Congress not the courts to decide whether there should be one That was four votes for the newspapers Justices Stewart and Byron White said they were convinced that some items in the Pentagon Papers raised the possibility of danger to the national security But the First Amendment had been interpreted to disfavor prior restraints injunctions and there was no showing here as Justice Stewart put it of likely direct immediate and irreparable damage to our nation or its people Justice White added that a criminal prosecution would face a less demanding constitutional test virtually inviting one to the distress of the newspapers The importance of the 6 to 3 vote for the newspapers for all its diverse bases is clear if one considers what a Supreme Court judgment enjoining further publication would have done to judicial and press attitudes in the following years Were there in fact any dangerous secrets in the Pentagon Papers Erwin N Griswold who as solicitor general argued the case for the government in the Supreme Court wrote later I have never seen any trace of a threat to the national security from the publication David Rudenstine concluded otherwise somewhat ambiguously in his scholarly 1996 book The Day the Presses Stopped A History of the Pentagon Papers He argued that though the papers history stopped on March 31 1968 there were passages that could have done some injury to national security in 1971 Prados and Porter disagree They say that Rudenstine analyzed only government claims and testimony not the documents themselves They publish for the first time with only a few redactions what was the ultimate government argument for

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