archive-org.com » ORG » V » VVA.ORG

Total: 361

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • The VVA Veteran
    pure white ao dai of the young innocent girl All wore their shining black hair waist length some with it cut square across the ends others with it untrimmed They were visions shimmering in the heat so lovely so beyond our reach I dream of them still and wonder if they somehow survived Tet survived the war and gave birth to new generations of girls who bicycle across the Perfume River and into the dreams of young men They must have survived they are quintessential survivors with that tough inner core so fitting a nation born of a revolution in the year 40 A D led by two sisters Trung Tac and Trung Nhi The sisters gathered an army of 80 000 to drive out the hated Chinese Legend says the sisters chose 36 women including their own mother to lead their army They captured 65 fortresses Trung Tac became briefly ruler of an independent Vietnam The people enjoyed their freedom for just three years before the Chinese returned as ever The Trung sisters committed suicide to uphold their honor A Vietnamese proverb says when war strikes close to home even the women must fight They fought on both sides during the ten year American war In the north the Communists mobilized more than 200 000 women for service in the regular army militia and local forces In the south the other side had its Tiger Lady unofficial commander of her husband s battalion The south too had its dragon lady Madame Nhu and first ladies like Madame Thieu who departed with suitcases filled with diamonds toward a world of numbered Swiss bank accounts David Hume Kennerly won the 1972 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography for his photographs of the Vietnam War He served as White House Photographer for President

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2004_07/feature_dreamWalking.htm (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The VVA Veteran
    later still a lieutenant colonel in the Tennessee National Guard he began as a volunteer I volunteered to take it because I really enjoyed working with the people he said I did that for two years and then I retired I was then asked to come back about a year later as a volunteer on the board Then we started talking about going full time He s been the Stand Down director for four years now It takes a whole bunch of people to make this work Burleigh said There s been a lot of folks involved in this Half the original committee is still on the event committee I never dreamed it would become what it s become When I retired I had no plans of getting this involved After that Sunday afternoon when their hearts sank at the thought of transporting the homeless veterans back to the streets from which they had come the Nashville group decided to do more Out of that was born our full time agency Operation Stand Down Nashville Burleigh said That was four and a half years ago We worked closely with the city and our board of directors got a place for a service center and four houses We started offering services or at least making a referral for them We ve grown to the point where we re a United Way agency We have grants from the VA grants from HUD and private donations We ve been blessed with a tremendous amount of support Because we ve been doing the event for so long we have tremendous inroads to the city and state service organizations Burleigh said Operation Stand Down Nashville finds on average 240 jobs per year for homeless veterans They start tracking retention at six months and so far average 70 percent He said finding jobs for veterans presents a peculiar problem This may sound like a bold statement but if you have served your country in the military you have put yourself and your family at economic risk Burleigh said By way of evidence he tells a personal story Retired from the National Guard Burleigh went looking for a job He had a college degree and command experience His last job for the state of Tennessee saw him supervising 44 employees and working with a 135 million budget Burleigh sought out help from two executive headhunters They told him to come back after he had experience in a real job They told me that it was only after I had a real job with some real experience that they could help me Burleigh said Veterans have a higher unemployment rate than non veterans You re twice as likely to have a period of homelessness in your life than a non veteran What we have to do is get it across to employers that when they hire a veteran they re dealing with someone who knows organization and structure He has discipline and so many other intangibles you don

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2004_07/feature_operationNashville.htm (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The VVA Veteran
    Wall was one of the first projects the chapter tackled He was in charge of four hundred volunteers Lawrence was speaking to someone about one Boy Scout in particular and how impressive his work had been with visitors to the Wall He was talking to someone about a Boy Scout hugging a woman at the Wall Marilyn said I thought I want to meet this kid He sounds like a really good boy Mark pointed to him It was my son I was shocked She said David wasn t a hugger and for that matter he didn t come from a family of huggers either My family members are not huggers she said My son is not a hugger He s not one to display affection or emotion like that My boys are just country boys But that Wall made an impression on all of them There were no strangers there When you re out in the everyday world strangers don t hug But there were no strangers Everybody was brothers It didn t matter that you were hugging someone you d never met before in your life and that you d never see again You could feel what was going on You didn t have to see it You could feel it David just knew something good was coming of it When I worked on the Wall I enjoyed helping people he said I enjoyed seeing how grateful and excited they were when they found the names they were looking for On the final day of the Wall s stay in Memphis David Mullins would deliver one more hug that would lead to a new friendship an abiding interest in the Vietnam War and its veterans volunteer work in a VA hospital and recognition by Chapter 875 as Boy Scout of the Year Vietnam had been painful for Mark Lawrence He had married there and had a son His wife died in a rocket attack his son died of leukemia at 11 In the ensuing years after the Wall came to Memphis he would be diagnosed with PTSD He had seen The Wall in Washington but never went close enough to read names Not until Memphis would he do that On the final day as he carried a single rose to the Wall at the closing ceremony the weight of the years closed in on him and as he came down the ramp toward the silent crowd he wept David Mullins awaited him his arms opened wide I was pretty much in pieces Lawrence said When I came down and got to the last ramp I saw that same Boy Scout who had been hugging people but I couldn t remember his name He just opened up his arms and to be honest I felt the hand of God coming through him and into me It was such an amazing moment It felt like I was coming home This was before the Mullins family knew anything about me So

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2004_07/feature_dutyHonor.htm (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The VVA Veteran
    VVLP organization said We had 41 board members from across the state including Al Gore who was a congressman at the time and we raised the money for the memorial After Tennessee Gov Lamar Alexander and the Tennessee Legislature set aside the space for the memorial the VVLP group set about raising the 250 000 needed to build the project The fund raising was not easy Bartholomew said because a lot of people don t like giving to monuments they like giving to something that s operational Bartholomew is a 1966 West Point graduate who served with a 4th Armored Cav unit attached to the 25th Infantry Division based in Cu Chi and Tay Ninh on the Cambodian border in Vietnam in 1968 69 The committee did not hold an open design competition for the statue Instead the group examined the work of several top Tennessee sculptors and chose LeQuire A Nashville native LeQuire studied sculpture at Vanderbilt University in Rome and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro As a graduate student he had submitted a design for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington Like Maya Lin s winning entry Lequire s was a sunken memorial but was rectangular in shape with interior and exterior walls covered with relief sculptures containing Vietnam War scenes interspersed with the names of the Vietnam War dead Lequire who was born in 1955 is best known for his monumental Athena statue that sits in Nashville s Parthenon and his other public life sized bronze sculptures The piece that I submitted to show the Tennessee committee my work and one that I really wanted to do was more like a traditional Pieta LeQuire told us in an interview It was a wounded soldier being held by two other soldiers They liked the style of

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2004_07/feature_distinctionValor.htm (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The VVA Veteran
    Washington and elsewhere to see what they are doing to help this nation s veterans as well as our active duty sons and daughters Can we lead by the work we do addressing the needs through our visits to congressional offices Absolutely We are leaders representing veterans equipped with information that is hard for any elected representative to argue against We have mailed information to every chapter and state council on mandatory funding for VA health care as adopted by the Partnership for Veterans Health Care Budget Reform which comprises nine veterans service organizations The information contains tools that can answer questions about this issue Discuss it at your next meeting Prepare members to visit their representatives to ask that they do the right thing by supporting this issue This is our health care system and whether you use it now or later let s make it right for veterans and those VA employees who care for us Vote for someone who will make a commitment to support what is right It is important for all VVA members to show their interest by making appointments with their senators and congressmen to make the case for supporting veterans and mandatory funding We also mailed a VVA Vote for America 2004 package to every chapter and state council It has all the election materials including issue papers posters bumper stickers and buttons needed to register voters in the November election Please use the tools this election year Order more VVA Vote for America 2004 packages from the national office Get people to exercise their right to vote Let them know the importance of that right Thank you all for being part of this organization helping us to make a difference in the way those who served are recognized and cared for Your

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2004_07/president.htm (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The VVA Veteran
    military today as did several of the other major veterans service organizations While the provisions need to be strengthened as soon as there is another opportunity the provisions that were passed will help service members serving today in many ways VVA is grateful to Sens Clinton and Talent for their strong efforts DASCHLE AMENDMENT Sen Thomas Daschle D S D introduced an amendment to the S 2044 FY05 Defense Authorization Bill that would make important strides toward providing adequate funding for the VA health care system VVA and most of the other veterans service organizations have joined together and called for mandatory funding at a proper level for the VA hospital system Sen Daschle crafted a way to solve the dilemma faced by Congress in how to accomplish proper and adequate funding by calling for continuing discretionary funding for the next ten years at the FY 2004 level of 26 2 billion for veterans health care Additionally the Daschle amendment would provide for mandatory funding each year calculated on the number of veterans using the system and indexed for medical inflation The amount available next year under the Daschle proposal would be an additional 4 7 billion in mandatory funding to be delivered by the Comptroller of the United States on October 1 to the VA whether the discretionary spending package is enacted by then or not The amendment originally was scheduled for debate and a vote on the afternoon of June 22 the 60th Anniversary of enactment the GI Bill This would have been fitting and proper However the majority leadership at the last minute postponed the debate and vote in order to insure that several senators who strongly favored the amendment would not be available to participate in the debate nor vote on this legislation In the end the amendment never made it to the Senate floor because the vote to waive the budget rules of the Senate failed 49 to 48 Sixty votes were needed to waive the budget rules and consider the Daschle amendment FORUM ON MANDATORY FUNDING VVA life member Lane Evans D Ill who also serves as the Ranking Member on the House Veterans Affairs Committee sponsored a forum on June 3 on the issue of funding veterans health care Evans is the author of H R 2318 the Assured Funding for Veterans Health Care Act which has 184 co sponsors from both sides of the aisle He was joined by Sen Tim Johnson D S D who sponsored S 50 a companion bill in the Senate Johnson is the only member in either the Senate or the House who has a son or daughter serving on active duty in a combat zone The discussion put on the record the arguments for mandatory funding and certainly for a significant change in how the VA s medical operations are funded Speaking on behalf of VVA President Tom Corey Rick Weidman noted VVA believes some members of Congress are genuine in their belief that two thirds

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2004_07/gov.htm (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The VVA Veteran
    nine Regional Directors Kathi Tauer Region 1 Margaret Wojciechowicz Region 2 Elaine Simmons Region 3 Mary Yeomans Region 4 Judy Bolio Region 5 Jeani Wells Region 6 Patsy Varnell Region 7 Sandra Pitcox Region 8 and Sonja Holybee Region 9 The are outstanding They have put in many days of work many frustrating hours and they have also taken care of their families Thank you It is with sadness that I report Bill Kathi Margaret and Jeani will be stepping down from their positions They volunteered to work hard to make this organization a great one Thank you for your unconditional friendships If you see them at the Leadership Conference give them all your hugs and thanks The experience of meeting talking and e mailing with so many VVA and AVVA members has been truly great I hope you know that I will always be here to correspond and to visit VVA State Council meetings I am not going away This will enable me to work hard for the programs that I feel need to be made solid So if you need me call I will always be there for you all AVVA REGION 5 REPORT Illinois Involvement BY JUDITH G BOLIO REGION 5 DIRECTOR Associates in Illinois are very passionate about what they do for veterans their families and their communities In the past year AVVA members with their affiliated chapters have attended many veterans funerals put on and attended benefits for many causes including helping cancer patients and their families who are in financial and emotional need and attended all kinds of ceremonies including flag ceremonies centennial ceremonies and ceremonies to send our troops off to war The Associates of Illinois has been a member of the committee for the Illinois Vietnam Veterans Memorial Vigil every year since

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2004_07/avva.htm (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The VVA Veteran
    involves intense fear helplessness or horror The classic resulting symptoms include a persistent re experiencing of the traumatic event persistent avoidance of reminders associated with the trauma called stimuli emotional numbing loss of sexual desire increased anxiety and hyper vigilance To support a clinical diagnosis of PTSD these symptoms must be present for more than one month PTSD is not limited to those who experience combat Other recognized non combat stressors include violent personal assault such as sexual assault physical attack robbery or mugging being kidnapped being taken hostage terrorist attack torture incarceration as a prisoner of war or in a concentration camp natural or manmade disasters severe automobile accidents or being diagnosed with a life threatening illness Consequently civilians in these circumstances endure PTSD as well Witness the high volume of PTSD diagnoses in individuals who were in close proximity to the September 11 attacks The Department of Veterans Affairs offers treatment and disability compensation for individuals with PTSD VA Vet Centers are open to all veterans for PTSD counseling Veterans do not have to be service connected for PTSD in order to use the Vet Centers Other PTSD programs are available through the VA You can call the VA at 800 827 1000 for more information or log on to the VA website www va gov Pursuing a claim for VA benefits for PTSD can range from fairly easy to fairly traumatic VA regulations require the satisfaction of three elements in order to establish entitlement to service connection for PTSD Essentially these include medical evidence from a professional psychiatric clinician of a current clear diagnosis of PTSD medical evidence of a link between current PTSD symptoms and an in service stressor and credible supporting evidence that the claimed stressor actually occurred If the service records establish that the

    Original URL path: http://vva.org/archive/TheVeteran/2004_07/benefits.htm (2016-02-16)
    Open archived version from archive



  •