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  • SIMPLE - Information Systems Approach
    Management Critical Success Factors Alternative Routes to Implementation Effective Implementation Asset Management for Small Utilities Interactive Training Practitioner Contents GASB 34 The 10 Steps to Asset Management Asset Management Guidelines Develop an Improvement Plan Reports Case Studies SAM Practitioner Tools Contents Getting Started Options for Getting Started Information Systems Approach The organization may find a weakness with one or more of its asset management information systems AMIS They may not have completed a detailed needs analysis but will have concluded that they need to either implement or replace an existing system such as Geographic information system Computerized maintenance management system Works resource management system Condition monitoring system and CCTV data records Fixed financial asset register Inventory control and store system No matter what system the organization plans to implement or replace they should consider it in terms of the total asset management quality framework including Business processes and practices Data and knowledge Information systems Service delivery This will improve the organization s understanding of the functionality and interfaces required between these systems The key success factors in AMIS projects are Deciding on a vision for your business in Asset Management terms What do we want to be like in the

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/Books/Contents/Getting-Started-%282%29/Options-for-Getting-Started/Information-Systems-Approach (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Case Studies
    Approach Full Needs Analysis Approach Modifed Gap Analysis Approach CIP Validation Approach Asset System Approach Existing Process and Practice Approach Information Systems Approach Case Studies Matching Inputs and Outputs Pathways to Asset Management Critical Success Factors Alternative Routes to Implementation Effective Implementation Asset Management for Small Utilities Interactive Training Practitioner Contents GASB 34 The 10 Steps to Asset Management Asset Management Guidelines Develop an Improvement Plan Reports Case Studies SAM

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/Books/Contents/Getting-Started-%282%29/Options-for-Getting-Started/Case-Studies (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Options for Getting Started
    Matching Inputs and Outputs Pathways to Asset Management Critical Success Factors Alternative Routes to Implementation Effective Implementation Asset Management for Small Utilities Interactive Training Practitioner Contents GASB 34 The 10 Steps to Asset Management Asset Management Guidelines Develop an Improvement Plan Reports Case Studies SAM Practitioner Tools Contents Getting Started Options for Getting Started This topic covers the following areas Step By Step Approach Full Needs Analysis Approach Modifed Gap Analysis Approach CIP Validation Approach Asset System Approach Existing Process and Practice Approach Information Systems Approach Case Studies Just as there are many ways to peel an apple there are many ways to get started in asset management each of which has now after many trials and tribulations proven to be equally successful Which approach we take will depend on our unique issues however several factors are critical to our long term sustainable success That we understand the Total Enterprise Asset Management Quality Framework TEAMQF that is involved in driving efficient and effective life cycle asset management That we understand the Business Value Chain BVC proposition That we use our asset management improvement program to deliver the most cost effective benefits but never forget that we need to have a

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/CMSPages/PortalTemplate.aspx?aliaspath=%2fBooks%2fContents%2fGetting-Started-%282%29%2fOptions-for-Getting-Started (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Matching Inputs and Outputs
    key issues of inter generational equity and sustainable service delivery Our second highest priority should be to spend our committed funds cost effectively For most organizations this will apply to the funds allocated for capital operations and maintenance We need to validate our capital budgets and our operations and maintenance allocations with a confidence level rating that allows us to meet our AM objectives most cost effectively This work should cover the current budget year and should look forward 5 to 10 years using the gateway or hurdle approach in SIMPLE CIP validation We should use the CLR rating process to identify the strengths and weakness in our current decision making and investment validation Our next priority should be to develop the details of future capital works programs beyond the 5 10 year period to a 15 20 year planning horizon This should also be done for operations and maintenance The main reason for taking these works through the hurdle process out to this planning horizon is to prepare a detailed plan for the analysis and data collection that will be needed to justify or validate these projects and programs at the time that they are likely to be required It is not our task to complete the analysis for this extended time frame as that is likely to fall to our successors However it is our job to provide them an outline and to ensure that the data required for their validation work is being progressed during our term of office The final key task for today s managers is to identify the significant future business risks that the organization faces The two main risk areas are The failure of assets to meet existing levels of service The future costs of expected levels of service especially where the population and demand for services is reducing or at the best static All these outputs are shown in the following figure It is the responsibility of today s management teams to address these issues in their asset management plans and to do enough analysis to understand the implications for the organization in triple bottom line terms Economic implications Environment implications Social implications If management teams can say that they have completed all these tasks then they will have fulfilled their key roles and responsibilities Of course we may only have sufficient funds to develop a basic asset management plan with a low confidence rating Even these plans may be a significant step forward over what most organizations currently have in place The confidence level rating process allows us to Report the weaknesses of these plans to our elected members and policy makers Argue for the funds necessary to improve the asset management plan to provide greater transparency and confidence in the reporting of future asset liabilities Increase staff awareness through ongoing training and development of technical staff in the management of the assets for which they are responsible If we prove the benefits using real assets the elected members can see

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/CMSPages/PortalTemplate.aspx?aliaspath=%2fBooks%2fContents%2fGetting-Started-%282%29%2fMatching-Inputs-and-Outputs (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Starters Inhibitors
    off to a successful start the AM Starters Group or Group 1 identified these success factors Management commitment management needs to understand that asset management is a process and not a project and has a long term focus The approach to implementing asset management must be tailored to suit the individual utility Policy to implement asset management from governing body asset management will only succeed where the governing body has made a commitment to provide funding support for the program Defined benefits to stakeholders the benefits from an asset management program must be clearly explained to all stakeholders and ratepayers Information technology systems that support knowledge management are essential ingredients in implementation of an asset management program Adequate resources must be made available to implement asset management staff should be solely dedicated to asset management implementation and it should not be added to their regular duties Training and education should take place at all levels in the organization There must be adequate long term capital investment commitment by the governing body Internal champions who promote the benefits of asset management should be identified at all levels in the organization Ways to measure progress towards implementation must be identified The organization should have access to the various WERF asset management tools available through SIMPLE Sustainable Infrastructure Management Program Learning Environment A realistic plan for implementation of asset management must be developed that takes into account resource availability and the unique circumstances at the utility The plan should be phased with prioritized actions and must be flexible to accommodate changes as asset management knowledge improves over time and A commitment must be made to continuous improvement in asset management so that decisions are made with an increasing level of confidence over time Experience shows that a structured approach to incorporation of the

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/Books/Contents/Getting-Started/Critical-Success-Factors/Starters-Inhibitors (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Veterans Inhibitors
    management program Funding resource constraints Effort not sustained variable commitment to program and schedule changes delaying implementation Reinforce business case demonstrating value for money from asset management program Ensure there is an asset management champion in the leadership group who can advise policymakers on the consequences of funding constraints Demonstrate successes achieved throughout the program implementation Continually highlight long term benefits from asset management and the potential consequences of not adopting asset management Resistance from operation and maintenance staff Why fix it when it is not broken and requires additional work Getting push back from staff trying to protect their long standing ways of doing things Sustaining support from staff during a long period of implementation Reluctance of stakeholders to meet increased rates used by staff to resist change STOP Impact on asset operators who are key to service delivery Change in management or personnel may result Leadership support may falter Funding resource constraints Business case demonstrate value for money and need to do things differently Champion in leadership gatekeeper Demonstrate how asset management will ultimately make jobs easier to perform Highlight long term benefits Inconsistent approach to asset management implementation STOP Failed IT implementation and organization change management builds skepticism and wearies staff to absorb and embrace further change Business case for AM implementation and IT system development Follow through on implementation IT solutions not compatible Limits benefits of asset management implementation and potentially leads to disillusionment of staff Business case for asset management implementation and IT system development need to be clearly articulated Lack of understanding of asset management If potential benefits are not recognized at the outset there may be problems in the program getting off the ground Business case demonstrated value for money Champion in leadership gatekeeper Demonstrate success as it occurs Highlight long term benefits

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/Books/Contents/Getting-Started/Critical-Success-Factors/Veterans-Inhibitors (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Success Factors
    at the executive level and one at the mid or upper management level Communicate Internal External extensively and effectively Develop and manage expectations of stakeholders Do not underestimate the importance of training skill building career paths Assertively solicit buy in at all levels of the organization through participation communication and education Develop a cross functional asset management steering team Involve senior management from the start and if time permits involve staff from every level from the start but be sensitive to and resolve early any miscommunications misunderstandings or conflicts arising Develop a very detailed work plan include as much detail as possible so that any future changes can be accommodated Drive home the fact that asset management is a long term never ending process that requires upfront and continuous commitment to continuous improvement Set short term and long term goals and manage associated expectations Make sure that key people have the time and commitment to the asset management program Devise strategies to overcome staff resistance and recognize that incremental implementation may be necessary to embed the program Keep communication channels open at all levels develop good communication plans at the outset Develop and continuously tout the business case for implementation

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/Books/Contents/Getting-Started/Critical-Success-Factors/Success-Factors (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Governing Bodies
    organizational strategy for a sustained asset management effort In the past infrastructure investment programs were determined primarily based on the age of an organization s assets Now asset function condition criticality and operating environment must be considered Minimizing asset life cycle costs results in savings that can be reinvested as renewal replacement and new construction Reallocation of investment is the primary saving achieved in new asset management implementations Describe the state of current assets and replacement and or renewal costs in order to communicate the full financial and service level implications of ageing infrastructure and environmental pressures Asset management can help make decisions to improve the budget by promoting an understanding of multiple funding scenarios and possibilities Agencies can no longer afford to repair by replacement Infrastructure needs to be maintained with the right level of investment to sustain service levels and bond ratings Asset management processes decide when and which assets to repair replace or rehabilitate Communities can leverage Whole of Government savings by adopting best asset management practices in all sectors that manage physical assets Asset management is not rocket science and simply makes good business sense Few things in a community are as important to long term

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/Books/Contents/Getting-Started/Critical-Success-Factors/Governing-Bodies (2016-05-01)
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