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  • SIMPLE - Step 5 – What Should I Do Next?
    Practitioner Contents GASB 34 The 10 Steps to Asset Management Asset Management Guidelines Develop an Improvement Plan Reports Case Studies SAM Practitioner Tools Contents Asset Management for Small Utilities Step 5 What Should I Do Next Once you have inventoried and prioritized your assets determined how much money you will need to set aside each year to fund the rehabilitation and replacement of your assets and explored funding options for your water system you can use your asset management plan to help plan your water system s future You will have a good picture of when you will need to replace your assets and how much money you will need to fund those replacements and continue to deliver safe and secure drinking water to your customers Remember that the worksheets should be reviewed revised and updated annually Your asset management plan should help you shape your system s operations and should change as your priorities change Current information in the worksheets provides a better picture of your system s position and better prepares you to meet your water system s future needs Taken in tandem with the strategic planning tools available in EPA s Strategic Planning STEP Guide EPA 816

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/CMSPages/PortalTemplate.aspx?aliaspath=%2fBooks%2fContents%2fAsset-Management-for-Small-Utilities%2fStep-5---What-Should-I-Do-Next- (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Worksheets
    I Plan for the Future Step 4 How Do I Carry Out This Plan Step 5 What Should I Do Next Worksheets Appendices Interactive Training Practitioner Contents GASB 34 The 10 Steps to Asset Management Asset Management Guidelines Develop an Improvement Plan Reports Case Studies SAM Practitioner Tools Contents Asset Management for Small Utilities Worksheets Worksheets for Step 1 How do I inventory my assets System Inventory Worksheet example System

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/CMSPages/PortalTemplate.aspx?aliaspath=%2fBooks%2fContents%2fAsset-Management-for-Small-Utilities%2fWorksheets (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Appendices
    I Plan for the Future Step 4 How Do I Carry Out This Plan Step 5 What Should I Do Next Worksheets Appendices Sources of Financial Assistance to Drinking Water Systems Introduction to GASB 34 Sources for More Information on Asset Management Safe Drinking Water Act Primacy Agencies Tribal Contacts Other STEP Guide Documents Interactive Training Practitioner Contents GASB 34 The 10 Steps to Asset Management Asset Management Guidelines Develop

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  • SIMPLE - Books
    SIMPLE Home Scorecard Glossary Weblinks EPA Training Search Feedback Privacy Disclaimer

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/CMSPages/PortalTemplate.aspx?aliaspath=%2fBooks (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Introduction to GASB 34
    generally accepted accounting principles GAAP for state and local governmental entities including publicly owned water systems The standards and principles developed by GASB are strictly voluntary However some states may incorporate them into their laws and regulations and therefore make them mandatory for local governments and the water systems they operate In June 1999 GASB approved Statement Number 34 Basic Financial Statements and Management s Discussion and Analysis for State and Local Governments Statement Number 34 revised several accounting practices and established new standards for the annual financial reports required of state and local governments The revisions were intended to make annual financial reports easier to understand and make the financial data more useful to decision makers GAAP and GASB 34 make good sense for publicly owned water systems as these principles are often the best way to keep track of finances Following them will help you form a better picture of your system s financial health forecast future shortfalls and continue to deliver safe drinking water to your customers In addition following GASB standards is a must for obtaining a clean opinion i e a good credit rating from an auditor Clean opinions are often necessary for loans negotiating favorable interest rates or issuing bonds GASB 34 requires An accounting of revenues and expenditures in the period in which they are earned or incurred This is called accrual based accounting For example if the water system provides water in December 2003 and receives payment in February 2004 the water system would report that the money was earned in 2003 This change will allow the system and its investors to understand the direct financial results of its investments A reporting of the value of infrastructure assets and the cost of deferred maintenance These measures allow the public to evaluate how

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/CMSPages/PortalTemplate.aspx?aliaspath=%2fBooks%2fContents%2fAsset-Management-for-Small-Utilities%2fAppendices%2fIntroduction-to-GASB-34 (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Other STEP Guide Documents
    on Asset Management Safe Drinking Water Act Primacy Agencies Tribal Contacts Other STEP Guide Documents Interactive Training Practitioner Contents GASB 34 The 10 Steps to Asset Management Asset Management Guidelines Develop an Improvement Plan Reports Case Studies SAM Practitioner Tools Contents Asset Management for Small Utilities Appendices Other STEP Guide Documents Other Simple Tools for Effective Performance STEP documents for small drinking water systems can be obtained from EPA by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 800 426 4791 and requesting the document by its publication number The documents can also be found on the EPA s website AVAILABLE NOW A Small Systems Guide to the Total Coliform Rule TCR This workbook Is designed to help small systems understand the TCR and the mandatory monitoring required under the rule Provides sample worksheets to help systems organize and track TCR monitoring data Provides appropriate follow up actions should monitoring show a positive presence of coliform Publication number EPA 816 R 01 017A Published June 2001 Safe Drinking Water Act SDWA Regulation Overview Brochure for Small Systems This brochure Summarizes SDWA regulations that currently exist are proposed or are under development that affect or will affect small water systems Emphasizes how the regulations relate to each other Explains the multi barrier approach to microbial and chemical radiological risks and how SDWA regulations fit into this type of framework Publication number EPA 816 R 03 017 Published September 2003 Complying With the Revised Drinking Water Standard for Arsenic Small Entity Compliance Guide This workbook Is designed to help systems understand and achieve compliance with the Arsenic Rule Provides sample worksheets to help systems organize data Provides guidance for small systems on their selection of appropriate compliance options Publication number EPA 816 R 02 008A Published August 2002 Strategic Planning Workbook This workbook

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/CMSPages/PortalTemplate.aspx?aliaspath=%2fBooks%2fContents%2fAsset-Management-for-Small-Utilities%2fAppendices%2fOther-STEP-Guide-Documents (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - The Seven Quality Elements
    to Asset Management Effective Implementation Asset Management for Small Utilities Interactive Training Practitioner Contents GASB 34 The 10 Steps to Asset Management Asset Management Guidelines Develop an Improvement Plan Reports Case Studies SAM Practitioner Tools Contents What is SIMPLE Quality Framework The Seven Quality Elements There are seven major quality framework elements Using them to drive improvements will result in a sustainable stewardship of the asset portfolio for future generations These elements are Life Cycle Process and Practices Asset Information Support Systems Data and Knowledge Service Delivery Organizational Issues People Issues Total Asset Management Plans Detailed information on the quality elements is found in the Asset Management Guidelines area of Levels 2 and 3 in SIMPLE The seven quality elements are broken down into 23 secondary elements Processes and Practices of the Asset Portfolio Life Cycle Demand Analysis Knowledge of Assets Asset Accounting and Cost Costing Strategic Planning Life Cycle Capital Expenditure Validation and Approval Process Business Risk Assessment and Management Asset Creation Acquisition Process Asset Rationalization Disposal Asset Operations Asset Maintenance Work Resource Management Review Audit Continuous Improvement Processes Asset Information Support Systems Primary Applications Secondary Applications Tertiary Life Cycle Applications General Overall Information System Issues Data and Knowledge

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/CMSPages/PortalTemplate.aspx?aliaspath=%2fBooks%2fContents%2fWhat-is-SIMPLE-%2fQuality-Framework%2fThe-Seven-Quality-Elements (2016-05-01)
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  • SIMPLE - Achieving Best Appropriate Practice
    steps in any order providing the activities are programmed in the asset management planning process Practices and Processes Asset management is built around a modest number of core building block techniques or practices and processes These include Asset registry hierarchies and data standards Levels of service condition and residual life assessments Valuation and life cycle costing Risk consequence determination Optimal renewal decision making Business risk exposure Confidence level metrics Whole portfolio financial planning Each of these can be deployed at different levels of sophistication The organization needs to determine what steps are required to provide the improvements and undertake only those that are warranted now The Principles of Sustainable Best Practice Asset Management An organization that is delivering best appropriate practice in asset management should be able to make the following claims as these are the principles of sustainable asset management It knows what assets it has responsibility or legal liability for It records these assets in a register down to a maintenance managed item MMI level It monitors the condition performance utilization and costs of assets down to the MMI component level as justified It aggregates this data to give outputs of cost and performance It stores data and knowledge about its assets in suitable corporate information systems that support asset management responsibilities It understands and records the current levels of service in terms of quantity and quality of service including Condition Function size type fit for use Regulatory requirements Reliability Repair or outage response times It thoroughly understands the critical assets necessary for sustained service levels and either monitors its assets to ensure they don t fail or mitigates the failure It understands the likely future levels of service required including regulatory requirements such as Environmental discharge standards Occupational health and safety regulations Building regulations It understands customers non regulatory expectations such as Appearance of facilities Number of complaints Response times to complaints It understands the full economic cost and minimum economic cost of service delivery It understands the long term capital and recurrent funding needs 20 30 year to meet these regulatory and customer expectations It has pricing and funding strategies that match the needs of the business and ensure sustainability It reports annually in triple bottom line terms that is economic environmental and social It understands the real growth of its business and the way in which the demands for service could alter in the future including changes in Population both users and community Unit demand for services Demographics of customers and users It monitors and reports on the condition performance and functionality of assets against prescribed service levels and regulatory requirements It links the asset condition index with service levels at a cost that its customers are willing to pay If the costs are too high for customers the organization engages in a stakeholder consultation program to identify trade offs and strategies to better meet customer expectations and service constraints It is able to understand the future level of service options available and their associated

    Original URL path: http://simple.werf.org/CMSPages/PortalTemplate.aspx?aliaspath=%2fBooks%2fContents%2fWhat-is-SIMPLE-%2fQuality-Framework%2fAchieving-Best-Appropriate-Practice (2016-05-01)
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