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  • Barry's Blog: Blog Forum on the Future of State Arts Agencies and NASAA - Day #1
    t wield within their state relative to their local arts agencies and the private philanthropic sector is different in every state based on how well they make this case and what role they ve carved out for themselves in the arts ecology Anita Walker The State Arts Agency operates at 5 000 feet developing public policy advocating for the field and focused always on public value for the citizens in every circumstance and in every corner of the Commonwealth who deserve quality arts in the same way that they deserve clean air safe roads and healthy food We are concerned with assuring an environment in which the arts can flourish excellence can be achieved and access can be assured I may have a Governor appointed Council of 19 members but my real board of directors is made up of 200 legislators overseen by 6 million people in Massachusetts We are the only funder that responds to such a large constituency a constituency that supports us with precious tax dollars Our 329 local cultural councils are on the ground They are the rich diverse landscape and their focus is local Their grants are small but their impact is large Their real power is not in the size of grant but in the fact that the decision making is owned and operated by volunteers friends and neighbors who know the community like no other funder possibly can Our local cultural councils respond to their elected city or town officials and the people who live in their communities Private funders in Massachusetts have been re prioritizing their investments away from the arts But those who still invest tend to drive a specific agenda through that investment Rarely if ever is the support unrestricted The largest grants are associated with major capital projects Their constituents are people of purpose but often occupy the board rooms and more elite places and spaces in our world While our funding has certainly diminished dramatically over the past decade it has not been accompanied by a loss of relevance or influence I think this is a result of an intentional effort and unintentional consequence We have certainly stepped up our efforts to add value to our relationship with the field in the absence of more funding But there has never been in Massachusetts and there is not now a robust investment at the local level in any city or town in a local cultural council We remain the primary funder Also there is no corporation or foundation making the kind of investment that has a major impact on the entire state Parenthetically just today the legislature approved a 50 increase in our draw from the state general fund This is evidence of our relevance and impact There is logic to the arts ecosystem in Massachusetts We are seeing the development of a new player a new advocacy organization that brings another important dimension to the advocacy effort reinforcing the work of the Massachusetts Cultural Council and tackling the parts of the political environment that are inappropriate for a state agency We remain relevant and effective as a leader because we are always conscious of our unique role in the arts ecosystem and respect and cooperate with our counterparts Randy Rosenbaum As director of the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts I occupy a different space in the arts funding ecosystem than my colleagues in larger states Rhode Island is a small intimate place We are the principal arts funding agency in Rhode Island We work closely with local mostly volunteer arts councils in a few of the 39 cities and towns but aside from our colleagues in the City of Providence our work tends to drive cultural policy making in our state Our budget has been fairly stable and I m convinced it would have significantly increased if Rhode Island s economy was any better In the past few years the arts have played a central role in a number of state initiatives promoted by the highest level of our state s political leadership We have been incorporated into our state s economic development plans the sale of art has been declared tax exempt throughout our state and our General Assembly has approved a voter initiative for the fall that if passed would allot 30 million toward capital improvements to cultural facilities The State Arts Council is the lead agency in all of these initiatives and so it s fair to say that our level of influence and relevance is relatively high Our colleagues in the City of Providence are well respected within City government and they have done an incredible job positioning our Capital city as a major player in the creative placemaking movement They have received two Our Town grants from the NEA support and recognition from ArtPlace and others and the admiration of many around the country for proving what a medium sized city short on resources but rich in cultural talent can do to revitalize a community As befits a small state we participate with them on cultural planning and policy making and they cooperate with us in these areas But I wouldn t say there has been a shift in influence away from the states and toward local agencies We each inhabit our own particular areas And that I think is where we need to be going I don t agree that state arts agencies should have a monopoly on cultural planning and policy making I think we all have our roles to play In my opinion we re most effective when we understand the narrow framework of our role the framework of those around us and we work and plan collectively Our prominence if that s the appropriate term comes from the respect others have for the quality of work we do and the people we serve so that they are willing to plan and strategize with us rather than at cross purposes to us People allow you to lead That

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/07/blog-forum-on-future-of-state-arts.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Upcoming Blog Forum on the Future of State Arts Agencies and NASAA
    staffing to support the regional blueprint to restore arts education to all 81 school districts in Los Angeles County Arts for All funds the largest arts internship program in the country in conjunction with the Getty Foundation programs the John Anson Ford Theatres and implements the county s civic art program The Arts Commission also produces free community programs including the L A Holiday Celebration which emanates from the Music Center and is broadcast on public television During 2005 Ms Zucker was on special assignment with Eli Broad to develop and launch Arts Culture LA a nonprofit responsible for marketing LA as a cultural destination Previously she headed the California Cultural Tourism Initiative which marketed the arts of California s three urban regions domestically and internationally She is the author of a regional study of individual artists as part of the California Arts Council s economic impact study on the arts Ms Zucker serves on the boards of Grantmakers in the Arts the Association of Arts Administration Educators is an officer of the Ford Theatre Foundation board a member of the Los Angeles Coalition and was a founding member of the board of Arts for LA Ms Zucker was previously the Executive Director of the Ventura Arts Council and was producing director of the Back Alley Theatre for ten years She received a B A in English from Barnard College and attended the Yale School of Drama 7 Anthony Radich Anthony Radich has served as the executive director of WESTAF since August of 1996 In that capacity he is responsible for providing leadership to the thirteen state regional arts organizations programs and special initiatives He oversees WESTAF s work in the areas of research advocacy and online systems development designed to benefit the cultural community Prior to accepting his position at WESTAF Radich served as the executive director of the Missouri Arts Council for eight years There he led the successful effort to create a state cultural trust fund supported by a stream of dedicated state funding Preceding his work in Missouri Radich was the senior project manager for the Arts Tourism and Cultural Resources Committee of the National Conference of State legislatures NCSL As senior project manager he worked with state legislators from across the country to develop state level legislation and policy concerned with the arts tourism and historic preservation While working for the NCSL Radich was appointed by Denver Mayor Federico Peña to chair the Denver Commission on Cultural Affairs the city s arts agency Radich earned a bachelor s degree in physical anthropology and a master s degree in art education from the University of Oregon He also earned a doctorate from the Graduate School of Public Affairs of the University of Colorado Denver 8 Kris Tucker Kris Tucker served as Executive Director of the Washington State Arts Commission ArtsWA 1999 2014 where she led a staff of 12 18 to provide programs and services including Art in Public places Arts in Education grants to organizations and community partnerships She served for 14 years as a Trustee of the Western States Arts Federation WESTAF served as a grant panelist for the NEA and was active with NASAA National Assembly of State Arts Agencies Kris was previously Executive Director of the Boise City Arts Commission Arts Entertainment Editor of the Boise Weekly and a freelance writer She earned her MA in Whole Systems Design from Antioch University Seattle and her BA from Oregon State University She lives in Olympia WA and is currently vice chair of the Board of the Olympia WA Artspace Alliance 9 Mark Hofflund Managing Director Idaho Shakespeare Festival Mark s career began at The Old Globe under artistic director Jack O Brien producing director Tom Hall and founding director Craig Noel Mark acted directed produced new plays held a board position with San Diego Performing Arts League and edited his mentor Alan Schneider s memoir Entrances Joining colleague Charles Fee in Idaho Mark served as liaison to Idaho Foundation for Parks Lands and Idaho Department of Parks Recreation whose collaboration made possible the Festival s 12 acre Amphitheater and Reserve at Barber Pool The Festival s statewide audience includes 50 000 students K 12 served by two nationally recognized school tours high school apprentice and community access programs and a School of Theater enabled by a merger with Idaho Theater for Youth Mark served on the WESTAF Board of Directors Appointed in 1994 to eight years on the Boise City Arts Commission Hofflund now serves on the board of the Boise Convention and Visitors Bureau chairs the Idaho Commission on the Arts and has completed a presidential appointment to the National Council on the Arts He holds degrees from Princeton and the University of California San Diego He served on the NASAA Board 2010 2012 Note I also invited former NASAA Board Chair and Executive Director of the Ohio Arts Council Wayne Lawson but unfortunately Wayne hurt his hand on a vacation and had to have surgery Wishing you a full and speedy recovery Wayne Here are the questions I put to the participants PART I STATE ARTS AGENCIES 1 For the better part of a decade state arts agencies have been under severe budget pressures During that period many of the state arts agency budgets have shrunk Meanwhile in some cases local arts agency budgets have increased In the process there has arguably been a shift in influence and cultural policy making power away from the states agencies to the local agencies or to the philanthropic community Do you think that is true If so what do you believe are the implications of such a shift To what extent have the state arts agencies seen their relevance diminish how might they regain their former prominence and what do you envision as their future role in the overall arts ecosystem What ought to be the role of SAAs in developing state arts cultural policy 2 Some of you on this panel as well

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/07/upcoming-blog-forum-on-future-of-state.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Updates, Play Santa Claus in July, Congratulations and Happy 4th
    sounds good and is indeed worthy I can give you two good reasons why you might part with the cost of a couple of Starbuck s half caffeine double mocha caramel latte frappacinnos First Ian and the people he has assembled to help with his newest reinvention of his site are exactly the people we want to support in our field young smart dedicated committed people who are already making a contribution to the field to help make things better for everyone Supporting that alone ought to be worth ten or twenty bucks But Second I can almost guarantee you that if you follow whatever Createquity does over the next year you will read two or more posts that you you personally will find of great value to what you are doing on your job That ought to be worth a few bucks no And how often do you get to play Santa Claus in July Congratulations for two excellent hires Danielle Brazell the Executive Director for Arts for L A since its inception was named the head of the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs Danielle has done a remarkable job at Arts for L A and she has earned this appointment and I join the chorus of those who applaud its announcement F Javier Torres Senior Program Officer at the Boston Foundation has been named to head the grant making program at Art Place the principal placemaking funder for the field Torres has earned a place on many people s leaders for our future list including mine and I think this is a great move by Jamie Bennett at Arts Place Congratulations to both Wishing you all a Happy July 4th Have a great holiday Don t Quit Barry Posted by Barry at 9 59 PM No comments Post a Comment Newer Post Older Post Home Subscribe to Post Comments Atom Creative Vitality Suite Defined by the 59 SOC codes used in CVSuite Subscribe via email Enter your email address Delivered by FeedBurner Subscribe via Reader Subscribe in a reader Barry s Blog is a service of the Western States Arts Federation WESTAF The opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of WESTAF Followers Buy Barry s Book HARDBALL LOBBYING FOR NONPROFITS Barry learned political advocacy the hard way convincing the California legislature to multiply many fold its investment in arts funding In his new book Barry extracts the lessons of his long experience into a readable and impassioned tutorial that has broad application throughout the nonprofit sector John Kriedler former President Community Initiative Fund This is a powerful provocative and daring look at the ups and downs of fighting for beliefs The book straightforwardly mixes together simple clear definitions strong opinions new ideas and in your face strategies all designed to help the good guys win Robert L Lynch President CEO Americans for the Arts Hardball Lobbying is an essential tool for every nonprofit leader who wants to see systems change and public

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/07/updates-play-santa-claus-in-july.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Random thoughts on Things to Blog About
    that will continuously monitor your health but remember there will be myriad other applications how might that impact live performances or the creation of art itself It may enhance and detract but how 10 Is the Performing Arts business model live performances in a designated venue just about dead now or only still evolving Can the current model really work without government support 11 Is the future development and deployment of Robotics a threat or boom to the arts It may for example make set design cheaper and better but may cost jobs in so doing What other ways might robotics impact the creation or presentation of art 12 If funders want real transparency shouldn t they share with us all the reasons why they do not fund specific proposals and grantees 13 The arts are finally gaining a seat at the tables where decisions that impact us are made from cities and the Mayor s and Governor s Conferences to federal and state agencies to private sector tables thanks to the hard work of a lot of people in our field As we gain more of those seats how will we manage communication between those representing us at those tables so that the right hand knows what the left hand is doing and we maintain a consistent message across all those tables What kind of mechanism can we develop that will insure a pipeline for all our people who are at those tables 14 People are our greatest asset and it is our best people who make for our many successes Why don t we allocate at least a part of our funding to support those people and their ideas themselves rather than specific projects and programs If you trust the track record of extraordinary people why not fund them to come up with a project or program upfront An editorial in Blue Avocado put it better than I can These days there are so many people creating tools for nonprofit leaders and for activists Foundations fund online tools research studies websites that analyze and present data convenings on new tools and so forth We have a million factories making hammers But we don t have enough carpenters to use all these hammers Every few months we have a dozen more foundation funded studies on taxes but almost no funding for nonprofits organizing for tax reform We have thousands of whitepapers with recommendations for lawmakers and almost no money for people organizing voters who will elect lawmakers who might take those recommendations In fact if we had more carpenters they would buy more hammers they d drive up demand A carpenter driven market would drive quality usefulness and price in hammers If only foundations would fund fewer new hammer factories and instead fund a lot more carpenters we might actually see more houses built And maybe pigs will fly to the stars 15 Is there a single bigger threat to the arts than the disappearance of the middle class As the one percent s share of the nation s wealth grows at the expense of the middle and lower classes will that take us back to the model of the Medicis as the principal arts patron funders What does the widening of the gap between the have and have nots mean for the future survivability of the arts field 16 A number of futurists suggest that the single most important business skill is foresight How is it developed And speaking of futurists where are the arts futurists those who can spot the trends that impact our planning and efforts 17 In the supposed age of people wanting authenticity and nowhere more so than in their travel experiences why aren t the arts a part of the package of services you can pre book and purchase on sites like Orbitz and Kayak Hotels flights rent a cars and the arts 18 And on the tourism hospitality front why aren t restaurant associations our biggest backers They as much as any group enjoy direct economic benefit from the performing arts Where are those major intersection partnerships And I don t just mean restaurants giving a small discount to performance ticket holders as a one off but sustained industry wide support 19 There ought to be some national model for a dedicated revenue stream for the arts allocated on a per capita basis from its source What about a 25 cent per movie ticket add on Ticket prices keep going up anyway Would it discourage movie going The problem is the industry would vehemently oppose it even if you provided a portion to cover any of their out of pocket costs in implementing it I know I tried it in California and got nowhere But I think over time we might be able to guilt them into it with the help of some high profile celebrities and well placed power brokers 20 What would an Arts Ombudsman do 21 Lots of people think that writing basic computer programming will be an absolutely essential core business skill in the not too distant future What are we doing to make sure arts managers are competent in that area if that comes to pass 22 Where is the Arts Hall of Fame 23 As arts managers how do we hone the skill of cutting to the chase and quickly sifting through all the b s to get to the heart of the matter on any given decision 24 If one out of every three Executive Directors or Senior level arts managers will retire or exit their posts in the next five years as predicted what are we doing to preserve their storehouses of knowledge and experience for the future Take for example the recent retirement announcements of Jonathan Katz of NASAA and Patrice Walker Powell of the NEA two of the giants of our field Are we just going to lose their knowledge Those who replace them will not be emerging leaders they will be

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/06/random-thoughts-on-things-to-blog-about.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Report on NEA / UK Arts and Humanities Research Council Meeting
    and half A few additional items were remarkable There were no quantitative versus qualitative debates muddying up the presentations Participants either advocated for mix methods approaches or followed the methodological axiom choose the best method to answer the question This might have been the influence of the UK on the convening UNESCO economist Lydia Deloumeaux joked at the reception for the conference that depending on what part of the world one lives in the word data is either singular or plural Many of us laughed as I said it was a very wonky conference Jon Clifton managing director of the Gallup World Poll presented early results from Gallup s global survey of subjective well being To more than a few grumbles he indicated that well being might be a better predictor of political unrest and revolution than Gross Domestic Product When asked how one can access Gallup s data he responded that Gallup had invested over 100 million in the data and thus the data were available for a fee That was one direct lesson on managing the rising costs of research Hasan Bakshi director of Nesta s creative economy research program delivered intriguing preliminary findings from a study of the impact of live theater broadcasts on theater attendance The full report is one to look out for Abigail Gilmore of the University of Manchester reported on her promising research on everyday arts participation in Manchester demonstrating the value of longitudinal qualitative research UK Deputy Ambassador Patrick Davies referenced pop sensations One Direction several times during his welcome offering a truly expanded definition of culture I believe the organizers have plans for releasing recordings from the conference and I highly recommend taking a look when they are available This was an important event for the field not just those of us who work at the intersections of research and policy Thanks Bryce Have a great week Don t Quit Barry Posted by Barry at 11 37 PM No comments Post a Comment Newer Post Older Post Home Subscribe to Post Comments Atom Creative Vitality Suite Defined by the 59 SOC codes used in CVSuite Subscribe via email Enter your email address Delivered by FeedBurner Subscribe via Reader Subscribe in a reader Barry s Blog is a service of the Western States Arts Federation WESTAF The opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of WESTAF Followers Buy Barry s Book HARDBALL LOBBYING FOR NONPROFITS Barry learned political advocacy the hard way convincing the California legislature to multiply many fold its investment in arts funding In his new book Barry extracts the lessons of his long experience into a readable and impassioned tutorial that has broad application throughout the nonprofit sector John Kriedler former President Community Initiative Fund This is a powerful provocative and daring look at the ups and downs of fighting for beliefs The book straightforwardly mixes together simple clear definitions strong opinions new ideas and in your face strategies all designed to help the good guys win

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/06/report-on-nea-uk-arts-and-humanities.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Arts in the Schools May Not Solve the Declining Arts Audience Challenge
    this point in their lives It may be more an investment long term though those are the studies we need to answer that question It may be that certain forms of technological access may increase the interest of differing generations or again that may turn out not to be true And even if it moves interest upward that may not translate into increased live performance attendance It may also be true that certain of the fine art forms do not necessarily have broad appeal across generations but are most attractive to more narrow age cohorts Then too we must also examine the proposition that certain art forms have a finite potential audience period and that the audiences for them are not likely to significantly increase in size no matter what we do to attract them or even when we do it And if that is the case then the issue is how to protect that art form for the present and for posterity given that it may not be sustainable on its own And that may involve some very hard choices I just don t think we should put too much stock in the proposition that once the arts are back in the schools or once we can get people to sample the arts the audience problem will eventually be solved There is no credible evidence yet to support such a thesis Successful marketing may require a great deal more than simply providing access or promoting sampling of experiences Have a great week Don t Quit Barry Posted by Barry at 12 23 AM 8 comments Randy Cohen June 3 2014 at 2 49 PM Hey Barry You highlight a persistent worry for everyone in the arts world this week that there is no connection between arts education and future arts participation The good news is that there actually are several top drawer research studies published by the NEA based on their gold standard Survey of Public Participation in the Arts research that arts education is indeed a good predictor of adult participation In Nick Rabkin and E C Hedberg s excellent 2011 report Arts education in America What the declines mean for arts participation the NEA chairman Rocco Landesman highlights the report s finding in his introduction Arts education in childhood is the most significant predictor of both arts attendance and personal arts creation throughout the rest of a person s life Going back a few years to the 1996 NEA report by Louis Bergonzi and Julia Smith entitled Effects of Arts Education on Participation in the Arts the authors came to a similar conclusion Those who had more arts education were more likely to attend arts performances a relationship which was about four times stronger than that of any other factor considered More research is always needed especially as it relates to the rapidly expanding modalities of arts participation and engagement but the extant research certainly suggests a stronger connection than you imply Thanks Randy Cohen Reply Delete Replies Barry June 4 2014 at 5 04 AM Thanks Randy These two studies seem to conclude that indeed having arts as part of one s educational experience is a good predictor of future attendance at least at some benchmark event at least when compared to those who did not have arts in school Leaving aside the issue of whether or not having arts in school is a good predictor of participating in the creation of art as my blog post was limited to the role of arts education s correlation to future audience attendance participation only both cited studies conclude that those who have had arts education in school are more likely to attend an arts event than those who did not But there doesn t seem to be any evidence in these studies that validates the claim that those who have art in school are likely to become arts audience goers only that they are more likely to be arts audience members than those who did not have art in school Thus the question remains whether or not having art in school means that more people will become arts audiences in the future What I would like to know is whether or not having arts in school results in more people as our audiences not just whether they are more likely to attend than those without arts education The two aren t exactly the same thing One study acknowledged the dearth of reliable data about who did and did not get arts in school in the 20th Century and that makes it difficult to reliable conclude one way or the other about whether or not having had arts in school bears on our declining audiences And as you have pointed out to me these studies are now dated and thus the need for new additional research into the question Again I wholeheartedly and without reservation of any kind champion the provision of quality sequential curriculum based arts education taught by qualified and trained professionals with standards and assessment and available across the board to all K 12 students in the country There are myriad reasons that ought to be the case But I m not sure that one of the reasons is to insure that we have audiences in the future That having arts in school means one is more likely to attend arts events in the future than those who do not have arts in school is a positive for our field and is yet another reason to support arts education it increases the odds that someone will be an arts audience member in the future and that is a good thing and I stand corrected if I implied either directly or by omission that that wasn t the case But increasing the odds of audience membership isn t the same thing as becoming an audience member Delete Reply Leonard Jacobs June 4 2014 at 8 36 AM While I support your idea for long term studies

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/06/arts-in-schools-may-not-solve-declining.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Arts Entrepreneurship Blogathon - Day 5
    entrepreneurship and innovation talked about creative destruction Successful entrepreneurs and disruptive innovators almost always trample someone else s daisies which means it s often necessary to go it alone Innovation is closely related to entrepreneurship and the two frequently go hand in hand however they re not synonymous The simplest way to distinguish them is to say that innovation is the creation of new opportunities while entrepreneurship is the exploitation of those opportunities There is definitely systemic inequality in entrepreneurship I couldn t be an entrepreneur if I didn t believe that I have a right to imprint myself on society This belief depends on first feeling as though I truly belong in this society along with a pretty powerful sense of entitlement Needless to say this psychology is more common among historically dominant demographic groups White male privilege anyone Even more troublesome is the role that networks play in entrepreneurship It s almost impossible to create something new and substantial without tapping repeatedly into a network of mentors advisors and other resources To the extent that professional networks correlate to demographics they work unconsciously and unintentionally and therefore insidiously to maintain the socioeconomic status quo with respect to race ethnicity and gender Richard Evans Economist Robert Reich has called team building leadership and management ability essential qualities for the entrepreneur The successful companies of the future he has suggested will be those that offer a new model for working relationships based on collaboration and mutual value Whatever we think of Reich s view of art museums I d agree with the shift in traditional thinking about entrepreneurship that he proposes He emphasizes the links between entrepreneurship team work collaboration and mutual value that I explored earlier This group of qualities relates closely to the tenets of adaptive leadership and how I believe they inform not only the new approach of the single entrepreneur but the move to recognizing entrepreneurship as an aspect of organizational innovation which I described as a new discipline entering the arts field In my first piece I suggested that most not for profit arts organizations could qualify as entrepreneurial in the traditional sense in that they offer their performances and exhibits with a clear enough sense of the associated costs but with little certainty of them being fully covered by related sources of income They take on and deal with risk in the classic entrepreneurial fashion But nowadays that s not enough of a description of contemporary entrepreneurship In complex contexts when systems are in flux and the old rules may no longer apply entrepreneurial behavior demands more a capacity to manage risk but also a deep tolerance for uncertainty Risk after all can be calibrated from past experience uncertainty around innovation which relates to the future impact of new ventures cannot And in the current environment of rapid change disruptive innovation and shifts in cultural participation uncertainty rules Entrepreneurial teams address this uncertainty by using short term feedback loops rapid and re iterated prototyping and an advanced ability to continually question assumptions Such teams are also good at moving beyond the first shiny solution that is presented in their innovation work When time appears short and concepts have been swirling for a while it s always tempting to grab hold in a prehensile way of one of the first bright ideas that is put forward as a new solution especially if it comes from an established leader or a complete novice In our experience that almost always leads to a compromise result something mildly adaptive but by no means a breakthrough More time needs to be spent considering and discarding ideas until layers are peeled back and genuinely radical approaches can begin to emerge The poet Rilke s two rules for writing poetry are profound advice that applies to these team journeys I think When you re writing a poem Rilke suggested after three stanzas you ll have written everything you know you have it in you to write The first rule is Don t stop for then you will write what you didn t know you had it in you to write And the second rule is When you get to the end throw away the first three stanzas This waiting reflection and preparedness to let go of your favorite idea is not everyone s concept of a productive process Indeed in terms of traditional male attributes it can be a real strain to postpone arrival at the solution in this way male leaders are known to have a strong preference for the Shaper team role I introduced earlier This aspect of contemporary entrepreneurship in teams might be said therefore to offer an opening to better appreciation of less macho attitudes These dynamics are likely to lead to considerable conflict in an entrepreneurial team even one that views collaboration as a core value We ve found in our Innovation Labs that productively managing sustained conflict within the team is at the core of adaptive work As the adaptive potential of the work increases and things get real agreement diminishes quickly and a lot of heat enters the room as multiple perspectives on the past and the vision for the future are voiced and conflicting views on how to proceed are urged This group energy is vital and potentially transformative ideally it is managed so as to lead on to a breakthrough approach of high adaptive potential in favor of which there is sufficient agreement not unanimity for prototyping to be sanctioned In my experience however most trajectories with this promise become derailed by the heat of conflict as individuals run for the exits For arts organizations managing this trajectory over say twelve months is itself an extremely complex affair as our programs have taught us the friction tends to reach a critical level after about four months Incentivized by governance and funding environments to suppress conflict around assumptions vision definitions of success and organizational strategy few organizations in the arts field have become

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/05/arts-entrepreneurship-blogathon-day-5.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Arts Entrepreneurship Blogathon - Day 4
    impact of the arts is also in its infancy and in a measurement obsessed world that values what it measures it s not surprising that entrepreneurship is side lined seen as anomalous to the main action though anecdotally admired The arts world has been slow to pick up on the implications of complexity science even of systems analysis as filters through which the measurement of change and progress can must be quite differently calibrated Developmental evaluation that embeds the evaluator in the project team as a means of documenting and tracking the kinds of learning journeys I referred to earlier rather than preserving traditional independence has yet to be whole heartedly embraced What does get traction in the wider arts field is research into audience trends and cultural participation into capitalization and into the lives of artists The assumed benefits of more fully collecting and analyzing longitudinal historical data on arts organizations also continue to attract attention These emphases imply not only a pervasive pragmatism linked to traditional advocacy but also I think a continued reliance on centralizing principles on pulling it all together to see possible patterns across organizations agencies and individuals independent of their embeddedness in local systems But cross sector analysis of local dynamics rather than cross system comparison is nowadays more likely to reveal salient trends and must certainly inform future strategy at that level The siren call or glittering surface of Big Data may also be a factor here Massive aggregation and ramped up analysis are clearly of great value in mass consumerism in corporate targeting and in understanding historical trends in relation to local variances Its promise in the arts as elsewhere is widely touted But I don t see Big Data as relating strongly to developing arts entrepreneurship In our programs at EmcArts we used to compile financial and organizational data for Innovation Teams to consider as they began their work but we discontinued this practice as we found it closed down rather than opened up the space for divergent and illogical thinking Better to use random word association than five year ratio analysis This doesn t mean longitudinal historical data is without value to entrepreneurship and innovation But I find myself more interested in whether we can develop the ability to compile data that might use recent organizational behaviors and impacts to help in predicting likely changes in organizational performance if current strategies were to be maintained in the future I imagine some use of traditional numerical data but also attitudinal data capacity assessment and systems analysis being combined to create a suite of predictive tools The approach in the arts to data analysis has never been particularly scientific testing hypotheses to see if they are in fact predictive But in these times if we could assemble early warning tools to assist organizations including many that may have been doing well until now or very recently to see trouble ahead then we could so much more easily alert arts leaders to the need for adaptive change for a renewed entrepreneurship in the organization before the obvious indicators all turn red the precipice looms and a healthy future becomes so very much harder to achieve Now that research would be interesting Andrew Taylor Research in arts entrepreneurship is showing growth and great promise with at least one new journal dedicated to the topic and many faculty and scholars diving into the void There s massive opportunity to connect and translate existing research on entrepreneurship in other fields for profit venture social venture global venture From here we keep going And we keep making efforts to connect scholarship and practice in powerful ways Russell Willis Taylor Others in this blogathon will have more informed views about the research available on the topic I would only add that some centralized source of research summaries that helps leaders use the research already out there would be helpful to entrepreneurs Steven Tepper and Alan Brown are both field leaders who have made great strides in helping to organize and disseminate that research and we need more organizing of this area to make it easily accessible and meaningful to practitioners Ruby Lerner We re not engaged in arts entrepreneurship research so I can t comment on this Thank you panel Don t Quit Barry Posted by Barry at 11 03 PM 3 comments Melba LaRose May 29 2014 at 6 17 AM I don t know why you people talk on and on about this The arts as we have known them are dead dead dead Yes you can point to something here and there but that s it and those soon will be gone Time would be better spent creating some entirely new kind of artistic expression and using technology in the art as well as a means to reaching people This will be art to serve people in a newly revamped economic system and a world that progresses every minute of every day The younger audience knows nothing of art as historically presented The older audience is strapped for cash and dying off We better find something new or become subway conductors just a random thought It may be utterly impossible to be paid for new art but it s not paying now not that it has ever been lucrative Wake up folks tomorrow is here Reply Delete carter gillies May 30 2014 at 8 21 AM I am wondering how much research is being pointed in the direction of Psychology and Behavioral Economics It seems the default understanding is that art is at least potentially if not in fact inherently entrepreneurial and yet there is this whole mythology of the starving artist that has been so poorly explained Is the starving artist simply a defective entrepreneur Or are there things about being an artist that don t always fit with an entrepreneurial attitude Its not a question about the art itself as much as its a question of how human beings make a place for

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/05/arts-entrepreneurship-blogathon-day-4.html (2016-05-01)
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