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  • Barry's Blog: Arts Entrepreneurship Blogathon - Day 3
    called the report Intentional Innovation When we think about entrepreneurship in the arts we tend to focus on the launch of new programs and products rather than on the process of discovery design and prototyping The overemphasis on product over process drives other misunderstandings Funders urge organizations to add a new program reinforcing an unsustainable mentality of continued expansion and diffusion of energy when a stronger focus on building resilience is what is really needed If entrepreneurship and innovation are tethered to organizational growth and if growth remains the primary measure of organizational success then entrepreneurship in organizational settings is condemned to be a destabilizing force in the worst sense of the word Rather the disruptiveness that can attend innovation should be directed to making hard choices choices about what we now leave behind as no longer useful to us as much as about how we reconfigure our existing work Letting go is at the core of innovation My rule of thumb that organizations should work toward devoting 20 of their annual resources to the various stages of innovation requires that we regularly and aggressively make space for new ventures by stopping doing things that aren t achieving our desired impacts or that absorb energies better released for re imagining Becoming more provisional as an organization is in my experience a sophisticated capacity A related obstacle to entrepreneurial approaches gaining due weight in the field is the lack of innovation capital available to organizations resources held on the balance sheet for strategic investment in new ventures if and when prototyping suggests an opportunity to scale up and mainstream the initiative Few cultural organizations have in the past been able to build capital funds of this type on their own The norms of capitalization in the field with an overwhelming emphasis on illiquid assets such as endowments and buildings and a value system grounded in an unfulfilled search for permanence and stability have militated against strengthening this aspect of the financial profile Lacking these funds most innovations are condemned to remain what I call dworphan both dwarfish in scale and orphaned from the organizational mainstream relegated to the margins rather than intentionally growing to become part of core operations that new music series of two small concerts the single improv session in a local bar This is one reason entrepreneurship is blunted and adaptive change in the field is so slow A policy realignment is badly needed supporting new values of organizational flexibility and adaptability Yet there are also big opportunities for entrepreneurship in the arts these days Complexity is a particularly good environment for the entrepreneurial When as artists and organizational leaders we try to address complex challenges the familiar example is parenting cause and effect circle each other they are no longer in any kind of linear relationship yesterday s solution doesn t work today and often we re not sure what the problem even is In contexts where unpredictability rules established systems are in flux and new patterns are struggling to form the most useful response is to create the conditions for next practices to emerge This means probing questioning and experimenting to find the way forward As David Snowden of Cognitive Edge has written Because you cannot analyze the problem space fully in advance you have to be prepared to adjust systems interactively until you find what works This is work that an entrepreneurial team can excel at Where teams with little entrepreneurial capacity all Implementers and Completer Finishers will worry about perfecting five year plans and logic models the entrepreneurial team will understand the need for a good enough vision and get on with some radical experiments to test possibilities learn hard from them rinse and repeat This is the kind of team for funders to put their money on But that will only happen if we collectively re imagine our use of the word failure an even more toxic word in the arts than merger Of course if we reflect on our experience as artists we know that failure is endemic to the creative process that trying stuff out in a spirit of serious play and not getting it right is the only way we learn how to do things that have never been done before Yet this important understanding of productive failure has not translated to our organizations and funders We need boards staff and investors to support learning journeys and to demand that we ask difficult probing questions at every stage with candor and determination to change our approach potentially at every turn In this way and many others our organizations have to become more not less like artists This is very important because organizational innovation is the means by which organizations undertake essential adaptive work and can bring artists as entrepreneurs into the work as never before Innovation is a newly emerging organization wide discipline the most far reaching new set of capacities arts organizations can learn and I believe the most powerful new discipline to enter our field since the advent of strategic planning in the 1970s To overcome obstacles and advance arts entrepreneurship I think we need to ask What would it mean for us to encourage and support innovation across our organizational processes How might we bring innovative approaches to our strategic thinking What criteria do we apply in deciding to stop doing something in our organization Do we have an organized process for doing this What structures can we put in place to ensure it happens regularly Anthony Radich One significant obstacle to launching and advancing entrepreneurship in the arts is the continuing profound denial on the part of many arts administrators that much of the audience for certain art forms has moved on Often entrepreneurial efforts get a bad name because they are launched to save what cannot be saved Applying good resources and staff to such lost causes rather than applying them elsewhere is a huge waste Business entrepreneurs seek optimal circumstances in which to create

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/05/arts-entrepreneurship-blogathon-day-3.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Arts Entrepreneurship Blogathon - Day 2
    servant leader Individuals with a preference for this role gravitate to facilitating the team to drawing out all its voices and ensuring an equitable balance of input probing the diversity of perspectives to enable breakthrough thinking rather than the more usual gravitational pull of the loudest contributor By contrast two of Belbin s team roles are not clearly associated with entrepreneurship perhaps surprisingly The Shaper who favors rapid action can propose a compelling way forward and has the courage and stamina to overcome obstacles in achieving the result might seem central to entrepreneurship But this kind of heroic leader frequently fails to hear the questioning input of others and is insensitive to their feelings tramples rather than invests in ideas contrary to their own and may well propose the one solution to the challenge that is simple direct and wrong In terms of entrepreneurship the leader with an advanced capacity for appreciative inquiry is beginning to outrun the Shaper who perennially wants to cut to the chase Finally the Plant the naturally original thinker whose contribution lies in consistently coming up with creative and divergent ideas but who can also get lost in the clouds only contributes directly to entrepreneurism and to innovation if his or her ideas are taken up by others with the motivation and ability to get traction The ability to work with ideas from multiple sources molding and connecting them to generate resources is these days of more importance to an entrepreneurial approach than the cry of Eureka in the bath A further twist is that most people currently employed in the professional arts sector are pragmatists who favor a clearly developed system to get things done short term deadlines and repeatable outputs especially when resources are scarce and efficiency is highly valued what Belbin calls Implementers and Completer Finishers So it s not surprising that innovation has been sucked into this orbit being interpreted as primarily about coming up with new programs and products commodified innovation if you will This focuses on the wrong thing misses the true nature of innovation and reduces its power Because innovation is first and foremost a process a way of creating the conditions for emergent behavior for next practices to be realized All this has led me to conclude that what we most need to do in nurturing and preparing arts practitioners to be entrepreneurs is to build their skills in adaptive leadership as originally defined by Ronald Heifetz 1 seeing the larger system by getting on the balcony to identify complex challenges 2 facilitating processes that give the work back to people rather than impose a solution 3 regulating the distress of letting go that is associated with innovation and breakthrough change by choreographing conflict rather than suppressing it 4 maintaining disciplined attention to the challenge through reflective practice and 5 protecting voices of leadership that arise from below by respecting all sources of input and insisting on inclusion This kind of personal developmental work requires extended practice in one s own organization and out in the community alongside regular personal coaching At EmcArts we ve tried to create these conditions in our new leadership program Arts Leaders as Cultural Innovators One of the most exciting trends I see in this area is the evolution of the role of teaching artists Leaders in this emerging field are bringing the techniques of aesthetic practice and experiential learning through artmaking to bear on larger longer term challenges in organizational and community change Lincoln Center Education Big Thought COCA in St Louis and Dreamyard are all pioneers of this entrepreneurial approach Corporations are desperate for it but the social sector is also beginning to see its utility Michael Rohd s Center for Performance and Civic Practice in Chicago offers arts engaged partnership work that is developed in service to the needs of the non arts partner At the root of this body of practice is the need to listen over time so as to discover how the artist s assets and the partner s needs may serve each other in surprising moments and previously unimagined forms To put entrepreneurship into action I find myself asking How in my organization do we promote and celebrate divergent ideas What might make that safer How do we charter non traditional teams to develop ideas into new ventures and test them How tolerant are we of giving up our individual authority and control in the construction and chartering of these teams How can we learn to stay in the productive heat of idea conflict and not descend into relationship conflict Anthony Radich The area of arts entrepreneurship is often treated as something that is entirely new More widespread knowledge of highly successful arts entrepreneurs in the history of the arts would help that field understand that business entrepreneurship in the arts is part of a continuum that over the years has included some very savvy practitioners In the visual arts the 16th century artist Titian was a highly successful entrepreneur in the early 17th century Shakespeare was a remarkable entrepreneur in the music field 19th century composer Giuseppe Verdi made millions by knowing how to monetize his innovations These are examples of not only great artists but great entrepreneurs The entrepreneurial strategies these successful artists used need to be understood by today s art entrepreneurs Many of their strategies are as viable today as they were hundreds of years ago I would also argue that recognition needs to be given to arts entrepreneurs who have long labored behind the scenes practicing arts entrepreneurship in less visible positions in arts organizations These individuals have created value and new revenues by using entrepreneurial tools to grow earned income They have succeeded as business entrepreneurs by increasing ticket sales expanding revenues from arts festivals building museum shops designing online collateral sales programs and developing and deploying art classes for youth as both a means of income and as a way to cultivate future audiences Art entrepreneurs can be

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/05/arts-entrepreneurship-blogathon-day-2.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Arts Entrepreneurship Blogathon - Day 1
    debate or entertainment In our field this value is created for the public at large rather than for shareholders or investors Over the past few years the term has been used to cover a broad range of revenue generating skills and activities all geared to enhancing organizational sustainability But the creation of value remains the mark of the entrepreneur and the revenue generating is just a means to an end or should be In a recent discussion with a group of our Chief Executive Program leaders they identified three entrepreneurial activities as concrete examples of how this value creation might manifest itself in our field Partnering with social service organizations or being entrepreneurial in solving a community problem Being innovative in the way we connect with audiences and communities Redefining our institutions to remain relevant despite environmental shifts The principles practices and processes are explored in detail and with real intellectual rigor on Linda Essig s site and also at SMU s Meadows Program Between these two it would be hard to find better resources to detail all the aspects of entrepreneurship in our field These could perhaps be summarized as having a clear and compelling vision being able to communicate that vision to others having the stamina and expertise to operationalize that vision and having the skill to rapidly respond to changes in the environment These are not ordinary qualities and they simultaneously create things of wonder and demand a great deal of the leader Anthony Radich The definitions of the term entrepreneur are many The root meaning is found in the world of economics where the term generally has been defined as a person who through innovation and or insight adds value to a product or service and moves it to a higher level of economic return In recent times however great liberties have been taken with the term and it has come to be generally associated with innovation and the taking of risk not limited to commercial enterprise Although the term entrepreneur retains a strong association with a person who takes risks to make money it is widely applied to individuals in government education and politics who take risks and innovate to create non monetizable but often measurable results Of course the term social entrepreneur needs to be dealt with here as well because in the arts it is too easily confused with the term business entrepreneur The social entrepreneur aims for value in the form of large scale transformational benefit that accrues either to a significant segment of society or to society at large Social Entrepreneurship The Case for Definition Stanford Social Innovation Review spring 2007 While social entrepreneurship has a value and a practice in the arts we are not at least I am not talking about social entrepreneurism in this blog That said I find that the arts community is pretty undisciplined in its use of these terms and often blends the concept of the business entrepreneur with that of the social entrepreneur I don t think we can discuss entrepreneurism in the arts without first addressing its current context A key element of that context is the near collapse of a vision for the arts to be provided in whole or in part as a public good There has always been a commercial side to the arts such as graphic design music recording architecture popular filmmaking etc Unfortunately we are currently living in a time in which there is a near complete disinterest in arguments for support of the arts as a public good that has a position outside of the marketplace Today segments of the arts that have long had limited commercial application are being reviewed and considered for business entrepreneur treatment Without the dramatic fade of the vision for large scale support for the arts as a public good the entrepreneurial side of the arts would likely remain modest and the race to put the nonprofit arts into the marketplace through entrepreneurial means would likely be a and ripple not a wave Another contextual factor that stimulates the expansion of business entrepreneurial activity in the arts is the dramatic and well publicized entrepreneur driven success found in the technology sector Indeed when individuals can through entrepreneurial means not only become fabulously wealthy but also shape the way in which much of humanity organizes their communication information etc then not just the arts community but the entire society is drawn gold rush like to the entrepreneurial tools applied by the now enormously successful technologists The highly successful technology entrepreneurs have become the gods of our times and the power of their wake is too strong for the arts to avoid being drawn into it Ruby Lerner Take a look at the Wikipedia definition of entrepreneurship it states Entrepreneurship is the process of identifying and starting a new business venture sourcing and organizing the required resources while taking both the risks and rewards associated with the venture I think that s a great broad definition that encompasses business entrepreneurs along with what you re calling arts entrepreneurs It s important to note that this is not a new phenomenon it s just a new term There are plenty of entrepreneurial undertakings in the arts going way back like Artists Space the Wooster Group and Steppenwolf Theatre which were all founded in the 70s We didn t call them entrepreneurs then but that s what they were Arts entrepreneurship is a buzzword right now but I think the status of entrepreneurship in the nonprofit arts field has been strong for many decades At Creative Capital we re not really involved in arts entrepreneurship theory or policy but we ve developed a system that does a good job of supporting artists as entrepreneurs Simply put we believe that artists are entrepreneurs in the cultural arena and that they deserve access to the tools and resources that parallel what s available in other sectors Drawing from venture capital models we surround artists with a comprehensive support

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/05/arts-entrepreneurship-blogathon-day-1.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Arts Entrepreneurship Upcoming Blogathon
    Singapore chief executive of Year of Opera and Music Theatre 1997 judge for Creative Britons and lecturer on business issues and arts administration She received the Garrett Award for an outstanding contribution to the arts in Britain the only American to be recognized in this way and has served on the boards of A B Arts and Business Cambridge Arts Theatre Arts Research Digest and the Society of London Theatre She currently serves on the advisory boards of The University Musical Society of the University of Michigan Salzburg Global Seminar the Center for Nonprofit Excellence in Charlottesville and the Arts Management program at American University on the British Council s Arts Creative Economy Advisory Group and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts In 2013 Russell was honored with the International Citation of Merit by the International Society for the Performing Arts presented in recognition of her lifetime achievement and her distinguished service to the performing arts Anthony Radich Anthony has served as the executive director of WESTAF since August of 1996 In that capacity he is responsible for providing leadership to the thirteen state regional arts organizations programs and special initiatives He oversees WESTAF s work in the areas of research advocacy and online systems development designed to benefit the cultural community Prior to accepting his position at WESTAF Radich served as the executive director of the Missouri Arts Council for eight years There he led the successful effort to create a state cultural trust fund supported by a stream of dedicated state funding Preceding his work in Missouri Radich was the senior project manager for the Arts Tourism and Cultural Resources Committee of the National Conference of State legislatures NCSL As senior project manager he worked with state legislators from across the country to develop state level legislation and policy concerned with the arts tourism and historic preservation While working for the NCSL Radich was appointed by Denver Mayor Federico Peña to chair the Denver Commission on Cultural Affairs the city s arts agency Radich earned a bachelor s degree in physical anthropology and a master s degree in art education from the University of Oregon He also earned a doctorate from the Graduate School of Public Affairs of the University of Colorado Denver Richard Evans Richard directs EmcArts programs and strategic partnerships Richard s recent research program design and facilitation places particular emphasis on innovation adaptive organizational change and effective ways that the arts and culture field can respond to the demands of a new era for the sector His studies on innovation and capacity building led to his design for the Innovation Lab for the Performing Arts An expansion of EmcArts successful pilot Lab for American orchestras the Lab launched in Fall 2008 Fall 2011 saw the launch of a second national lab the Innovation Lab for Museums Richard also leads the design and implementation of the New Pathways for the Arts Initiative a series of community based innovation programs that is active in

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/05/arts-entrepreneurship-upcoming-blogathon.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Dinner-Vention 2 Guest List Nominations Closing May 15th
    in arts funding In his new book Barry extracts the lessons of his long experience into a readable and impassioned tutorial that has broad application throughout the nonprofit sector John Kriedler former President Community Initiative Fund This is a powerful provocative and daring look at the ups and downs of fighting for beliefs The book straightforwardly mixes together simple clear definitions strong opinions new ideas and in your face strategies all designed to help the good guys win Robert L Lynch President CEO Americans for the Arts Hardball Lobbying is an essential tool for every nonprofit leader who wants to see systems change and public dollars flow to the causes they care about Tim Wolfred Psy D Director of Leadership Services CompassPoint For those who want to begin a nonprofit I can think of no better guide and toolkit that Hardball Government students should read this as an insight into decision making as Barry explains how government and groups interact with one another at all levels Hardball is definitely not a book to collect dust but one to get dog eared highlighted debated and used Representative Adam Schiff U S Congress 29 th District California Click here http amzn to d1whZU HIRE BARRY TO SPEAK AT YOUR CONFERENCE email barryarts comcast net HIRE BARRY TO LEAD WORKSHOPS in Advocacy full and half day sessions customized to your situation Managing the Generational Divide in the Workplace The Business Side of the Music Industry email barryarts comcast net Popular Posts Widget by Blogger Buster Blog Archive 2016 11 April 1 March 4 February 3 January 3 2015 57 December 2 November 4 October 6 September 4 August 8 July 4 June 8 May 5 April 3 March 5 February 4 January 4 2014 68 December 6 November 4 October 7 September 6

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/05/dinner-vention-2-guest-list-nominations.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Planning and the Illusion of Being in Control
    a boomer the postwar generation that boasted numbers so large that it signaled a change in generational impact Boomers became the center of the universe in America celebrated courted and coddled It was good to grow up a boomer for all things were geared towards our tastes our thinking our concepts of the future I went to school at Berkeley one of the early centers of protest and the call for change We thought our fellow boomers all felt as did we We thought we were one a massive homogenous force for change and that the change we called for was because of our numbers inevitable Decades later we realized that while there was much the boomers shared that you could define boomers in numerous and reliable ways we were not of a single mind on anything Today boomers are as varied as the populace conservative and liberal and fit every other categorical definition The Millenials the children of the Boomers have replaced Boomers as the chosen ones This cohort is even larger than the Boomers were and they are the ones now chased and courted They are the future The X generation sandwiched between the Boomers and the Millenials and often give short shift because the size of that generation was arguably too small to have the same impact is perhaps ironically now the one that is coming into the power and decision making positions Xers entered the job market when jobs were still plentiful and they avoided some of the challenges the Millenials now face The Millenials are now the desirable target demographic and they are being studied and analyzed and huge amounts of data about them is being collected and the implications debated We in the arts have joined the race to make the Millenials our audiences our supporters a part of our world We are engaging in long term planning to understand what they want and why and how we can get them to embrace us But we may be making a mistake in assuming that our current understanding of that generation and how they currently behave or will behave allows us to craft long term planning with regards to getting them to become part of our world in the way we want them As a cohort the Millenial generation is as likely to change their perceptions attitudes and everything else as did the Boomers before them Their tastes are not likely to remain constant nor are their ideas and approaches to everything from philanthropy to leisure spending While they will carry with them certain shared characteristics over time and while the circumstances of their growing up e g the embrace of technology will forever impact how they act those common denominators are not likely to make their behavior consistent or constant over time as a cohesive group There is no reason to suspect that the Millenials will not undergo all kinds of changes in their tastes and behavior I would argue that we must be careful in making assumptions about them as we ought to be careful in relying on a whole host of assumptions about everything we try to plan for Certainly probability analysis where you can run the relative risk of all kinds and numbers of options can reduce the risk of planning mistakes But even there there is a danger in making major commitments in terms of long term planning that may turn out to be very poor and costly decisions Six years ago any number of entities embarked on the building of major facilities and such planning decisions very likely seemed well thought out and the right move But many of our organizations that embarked on that kind of building faced now with unanticipated changes in customer behavior for a wide variety of reasons regret those decisions If you build it they will come turned out for many a false prophesy more like If you build it you just may get stuck with it and the cost will change your model and not for the good forever While the short term quick fix approach to planning leaves us feeling less in control of our futures the fact that much of any kind of planning is but mere guesswork coupled with the narrowing of options that any commitment to any planning scenario may entail and the reality may be that the quick fix or short term adaptable planning model is the most reasonable approach to innovation being nimble and responding to changes over which we have little control and which seem to have a propensity for surfacing at the wrong time That kind of approach forces us to be in the moment and continuously rethink what we are doing and how we are doing The long term planning model allows us to ignore many of the instant variables and stick to actions that may or may not continue to be viable In short longer term planning provides us with an excuse not to work harder at adaptation innovation and being creative in our approaches To a degree it fosters procrastination and laziness Moreover it puts a burden on us to achieve stated goals and milestones that may be impossible and on a timetable that may be unrealistic That cannot help but negatively impact morale momentum and ultimately success If the variables that affect the what how and why we pursue any given business strategy are in constant change and our understanding of those variables cannot be more than a snapshot in time subject to change at a dizzying pace then how do we maintain any kind of control over how we face the challenges that come up A quick fix approach is arguably nothing more than a reactive tool that leaves you scrambling all the time just to maintain an already dire status quo But the reality is that for many variables there may be no other alternative The key may be in embracing re envisioning the long term plan to be

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/05/planning-and-illusion-of-being-in.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Collaboration and Diffuse Reciprocity or The "What's In It For Me Right Now" Conundrum
    understandable And the need for mutual benefit seems apparent on its face The question is whether or not that benefit must always be immediate or short term and whether or not there always needs to be a perfect alignment of interests If Mr Kramer s theory applies to our sector at some points then we really must ask ourselves whether the attitude of rejecting diffuse reciprocity as a value may be hurting us in the long run I think Mr Kramer is right We need to think more as a field and not just as members of a field A lot of our challenges simply can t be effectively addressed except as a field Collaboration may just not be an option but a necessity again in the long run And apart from the specific benefits of any single collaborative effort the benefits to the whole of us by collaborating in the first place are immeasurable We can t just talk about the big tent The fundamental challenge is how to promote a culture that embraces diffuse reciprocity and promotes the interests of the field as those interests may be in competition with our individual interests What precisely can we do The antidote to the attitude that only immediate direct personal gain is a prerequisite to justifying the involvement in collaboration is probably an increase in all kinds of collaborative efforts over time The more we engage in meaningful collaborations the greater the likelihood that an increasing number of them will succeed with widespread benefits the more we send the message to everyone that this is something we value precisely because it yields across the board positive benefits for everyone at least in the long run the more of us are likely to at least try to say yes to invitations to collaborate even if we have to carefully and judiciously pick and choose between numerous opportunities And as we get more into the habit of collaboration the easier it will be to incorporate it as a given in our strategies to move forward Mr Kramer concludes thusly How many times has someone asked you to partner on something that was roughly but not perfectly within your strategies and you ve said no How often have you asked someone else to partner with you and they ve said no Are you satisfied with the resulting level of collaboration or are you open to the possibility that we are making it too hard by being too inflexible requiring too much alignment and demanding too much process That is not to say that everyone should always say yes to every request Resources are limited and we can t do everything One of the biggest obstacles to growing diffuse reciprocity in the foundation world may be a shortage of discretionary funds which could enable foundations to test partnerships without having to change or abandon existing programs or strategies But I think the real problem may be cultural The current norm among funders feels like

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/05/collaboration-and-diffuse-reciprocity.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Content Marketing v. Arts Journalism
    accurate If that writer is also transparent in that s he doesn t attempt to deceive the audience including by way of omission of facts reports their sources and admits their employer employee status then I think probably yes Can opinion or editorial position be journalism Do lists and quizzes qualify for they often appear in newspapers across the globe Again one might argue either side But I m personally less interested in that debate than I am in whether or not telling our stories as a marketing strategy works or not BSO s effort to try to engage and possibly expand their base of support by humanizing the people involved in their enterprise is what hundreds of private sector companies are doing in earnest The public generally finds human interest content more engaging than hard news or data As long as such content doesn t pretend to be anything other than what it is it is a viable marketing tool It may or may not work but the attempt to experiment is I think both legitimate and to be applauded It doubtless would be better for the BSO to simply label the effort as a content marketing position make sure that any content created and then forwarded to legitimate news outlets includes the disclaimer that it is not unbiased independent journalism but rather content created by what amounts to a paid employee of the organization There are lots of puff pieces artist profiles backstage insights and other human interest angle content that are created by journalists and non journalists and picked up by newspapers and magazines and other news outlets all the time You don t have to be a certified experienced journalist to create this kind of content you just need to have a way with words that the reader will find interesting And if the reader finds your content interesting and engaging perhaps they will be motivated to be more involved more supportive of what you do That s the goal we all have While blurring the line between journalism and marketing is an issue I am personally more interested in whether or not content marketing defined as any marketing format that involves the creation and sharing of media and publishing content in order to acquire customers is a viable strategy for arts organizations The beneficial effects of content marketing remain debatable The approach has both widespread support and skeptics in the marketing and advertising world Some argue it works others argue it does not at least that it does not drive new traffic to your site It is but one way to try to engage people in your organization We are in a people business our people are artists and the creative people who work behind the artists There is huge potential to create interesting relevant and engaging content that helps to tell the stories of those people And in telling those stories it may be that we can expand our audiences and their support I

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/04/content-marketing-v-arts-journalism.html (2016-05-01)
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