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  • Barry's Blog: Dinner-vention Part 3
    your face strategies all designed to help the good guys win Robert L Lynch President CEO Americans for the Arts Hardball Lobbying is an essential tool for every nonprofit leader who wants to see systems change and public dollars flow to the causes they care about Tim Wolfred Psy D Director of Leadership Services CompassPoint For those who want to begin a nonprofit I can think of no better guide and toolkit that Hardball Government students should read this as an insight into decision making as Barry explains how government and groups interact with one another at all levels Hardball is definitely not a book to collect dust but one to get dog eared highlighted debated and used Representative Adam Schiff U S Congress 29 th District California Click here http amzn to d1whZU HIRE BARRY TO SPEAK AT YOUR CONFERENCE email barryarts comcast net HIRE BARRY TO LEAD WORKSHOPS in Advocacy full and half day sessions customized to your situation Managing the Generational Divide in the Workplace The Business Side of the Music Industry email barryarts comcast net Popular Posts Widget by Blogger Buster Blog Archive 2016 11 April 1 March 4 February 3 January 3 2015 57 December 2 November 4 October 6 September 4 August 8 July 4 June 8 May 5 April 3 March 5 February 4 January 4 2014 68 December 6 November 4 October 7 September 6 August 4 July 10 June 4 May 9 April 4 March 5 February 5 January 4 2013 64 December 5 November 3 October 12 Bryce Merrill reports from the Social Theory Poli Dinner vention Part 7 Dinner vention Part 6 Dinner vention Part 5 Dinner vention Part 4 Dinner vention Part 3 Dinner vention Part 2 Dinner vention Part 1 Aaron Dworkin on Diversity Inclusion Final GIA

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2013/10/dinner-vention-part-3_20.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Dinner-vention Part 4
    all designed to help the good guys win Robert L Lynch President CEO Americans for the Arts Hardball Lobbying is an essential tool for every nonprofit leader who wants to see systems change and public dollars flow to the causes they care about Tim Wolfred Psy D Director of Leadership Services CompassPoint For those who want to begin a nonprofit I can think of no better guide and toolkit that Hardball Government students should read this as an insight into decision making as Barry explains how government and groups interact with one another at all levels Hardball is definitely not a book to collect dust but one to get dog eared highlighted debated and used Representative Adam Schiff U S Congress 29 th District California Click here http amzn to d1whZU HIRE BARRY TO SPEAK AT YOUR CONFERENCE email barryarts comcast net HIRE BARRY TO LEAD WORKSHOPS in Advocacy full and half day sessions customized to your situation Managing the Generational Divide in the Workplace The Business Side of the Music Industry email barryarts comcast net Popular Posts Widget by Blogger Buster Blog Archive 2016 11 April 1 March 4 February 3 January 3 2015 57 December 2 November 4 October 6 September 4 August 8 July 4 June 8 May 5 April 3 March 5 February 4 January 4 2014 68 December 6 November 4 October 7 September 6 August 4 July 10 June 4 May 9 April 4 March 5 February 5 January 4 2013 64 December 5 November 3 October 12 Bryce Merrill reports from the Social Theory Poli Dinner vention Part 7 Dinner vention Part 6 Dinner vention Part 5 Dinner vention Part 4 Dinner vention Part 3 Dinner vention Part 2 Dinner vention Part 1 Aaron Dworkin on Diversity Inclusion Final GIA t GIA Day

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2013/10/dinner-vention-part-4.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Dinner-vention Part 5
    to help the good guys win Robert L Lynch President CEO Americans for the Arts Hardball Lobbying is an essential tool for every nonprofit leader who wants to see systems change and public dollars flow to the causes they care about Tim Wolfred Psy D Director of Leadership Services CompassPoint For those who want to begin a nonprofit I can think of no better guide and toolkit that Hardball Government students should read this as an insight into decision making as Barry explains how government and groups interact with one another at all levels Hardball is definitely not a book to collect dust but one to get dog eared highlighted debated and used Representative Adam Schiff U S Congress 29 th District California Click here http amzn to d1whZU HIRE BARRY TO SPEAK AT YOUR CONFERENCE email barryarts comcast net HIRE BARRY TO LEAD WORKSHOPS in Advocacy full and half day sessions customized to your situation Managing the Generational Divide in the Workplace The Business Side of the Music Industry email barryarts comcast net Popular Posts Widget by Blogger Buster Blog Archive 2016 11 April 1 March 4 February 3 January 3 2015 57 December 2 November 4 October 6 September 4 August 8 July 4 June 8 May 5 April 3 March 5 February 4 January 4 2014 68 December 6 November 4 October 7 September 6 August 4 July 10 June 4 May 9 April 4 March 5 February 5 January 4 2013 64 December 5 November 3 October 12 Bryce Merrill reports from the Social Theory Poli Dinner vention Part 7 Dinner vention Part 6 Dinner vention Part 5 Dinner vention Part 4 Dinner vention Part 3 Dinner vention Part 2 Dinner vention Part 1 Aaron Dworkin on Diversity Inclusion Final GIA t GIA Day 3 GIA

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2013/10/dinner-vention-part-5.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Dinner-vention Part 6
    to help the good guys win Robert L Lynch President CEO Americans for the Arts Hardball Lobbying is an essential tool for every nonprofit leader who wants to see systems change and public dollars flow to the causes they care about Tim Wolfred Psy D Director of Leadership Services CompassPoint For those who want to begin a nonprofit I can think of no better guide and toolkit that Hardball Government students should read this as an insight into decision making as Barry explains how government and groups interact with one another at all levels Hardball is definitely not a book to collect dust but one to get dog eared highlighted debated and used Representative Adam Schiff U S Congress 29 th District California Click here http amzn to d1whZU HIRE BARRY TO SPEAK AT YOUR CONFERENCE email barryarts comcast net HIRE BARRY TO LEAD WORKSHOPS in Advocacy full and half day sessions customized to your situation Managing the Generational Divide in the Workplace The Business Side of the Music Industry email barryarts comcast net Popular Posts Widget by Blogger Buster Blog Archive 2016 11 April 1 March 4 February 3 January 3 2015 57 December 2 November 4 October 6 September 4 August 8 July 4 June 8 May 5 April 3 March 5 February 4 January 4 2014 68 December 6 November 4 October 7 September 6 August 4 July 10 June 4 May 9 April 4 March 5 February 5 January 4 2013 64 December 5 November 3 October 12 Bryce Merrill reports from the Social Theory Poli Dinner vention Part 7 Dinner vention Part 6 Dinner vention Part 5 Dinner vention Part 4 Dinner vention Part 3 Dinner vention Part 2 Dinner vention Part 1 Aaron Dworkin on Diversity Inclusion Final GIA t GIA Day 3 GIA

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2013/10/dinner-vention-part-6.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Dinner-vention Part 7
    new ideas and in your face strategies all designed to help the good guys win Robert L Lynch President CEO Americans for the Arts Hardball Lobbying is an essential tool for every nonprofit leader who wants to see systems change and public dollars flow to the causes they care about Tim Wolfred Psy D Director of Leadership Services CompassPoint For those who want to begin a nonprofit I can think of no better guide and toolkit that Hardball Government students should read this as an insight into decision making as Barry explains how government and groups interact with one another at all levels Hardball is definitely not a book to collect dust but one to get dog eared highlighted debated and used Representative Adam Schiff U S Congress 29 th District California Click here http amzn to d1whZU HIRE BARRY TO SPEAK AT YOUR CONFERENCE email barryarts comcast net HIRE BARRY TO LEAD WORKSHOPS in Advocacy full and half day sessions customized to your situation Managing the Generational Divide in the Workplace The Business Side of the Music Industry email barryarts comcast net Popular Posts Widget by Blogger Buster Blog Archive 2016 11 April 1 March 4 February 3 January 3 2015 57 December 2 November 4 October 6 September 4 August 8 July 4 June 8 May 5 April 3 March 5 February 4 January 4 2014 68 December 6 November 4 October 7 September 6 August 4 July 10 June 4 May 9 April 4 March 5 February 5 January 4 2013 64 December 5 November 3 October 12 Bryce Merrill reports from the Social Theory Poli Dinner vention Part 7 Dinner vention Part 6 Dinner vention Part 5 Dinner vention Part 4 Dinner vention Part 3 Dinner vention Part 2 Dinner vention Part 1 Aaron Dworkin on

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2013/10/dinner-vention-part-7.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: Interview with Judi Jennings
    policy is made the inference being that the arts are only women s work in the most pejorative sense Do you think a female President of the United States would really change that reality How do we deal with marginalization of the arts Judi A female President of the US could definitely change current realities Look at Annise Parker the Mayor of Houston for example She recently announced an exciting new cultural plan with substantial funding for the arts She is a woman who obviously understands the power of arts and culture I believe this kind of consciousness is a better determinant in lifting up art and culture than the President s gender however I also believe that transformative change requires local participation as well as a strong national leader Arts policy blogger Arlene Goldbard is a leading voice for creative ways to address the marginalization of the arts I love how she is working with Adam Horowitz to develop the idea of a US Department of Arts and Culture I agree with Ken Wilson of the Christensen Fund that a too narrow definition of the arts is a major contributor to marginalization Wilson argues that One of the challenges is that art tends to be defined as creativity professionalized and separated from daily life It is important to study the cultural dimension to arts funding which includes how people live with creativity and traditions in their daily life Barry What would you like to see your fellow philanthropic foundation colleagues do to be more supportive of artists in general and feminist artists in particular Judi I would like to see my colleagues take more time to understand how arts and culture philanthropy itself may be perpetuating systemic inequalities that can have negative impacts on people of color and poor people Inequalities in arts and cultural funding are often attributed to standards of quality but I believe it is really more about power than aesthetics The Peoples Institute for Survival and Beyond compares structural inequalities to a big foot kicking communities in the backside PISB challenges philanthropists to conduct our own power analysis to see how arts and cultural programs we fund may be part of that big foot I believe the most important thing we can do as funders is to analyze our own practices and assumptions to be sure we are providing equitable access to all communities Barry How do you nurture innovation and risk taking by your grantees Judi KFW funds mostly individual artists in a state where many people still know each other personally KFW tells the feminist artists we fund that we believe in them and the power of their work to create change The artists tell us all the time that this affirmation is as important as the money we give We believe in the power of small grants so artists can try out new ideas and take chances We do not require a work sample for our retreat program so artists can experiment with new forms and ideas In the grant program we accept their definition of risk and innovation in their own context instead of imposing some artificial standard Last year for example Afrilachian African American and Appalachian writer Bianca Spriggs and photographer Angel Clark presented a courageous performance piece and installation honoring 13 women and girls who were lynched in Kentucky in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries Barry Assess the current level of collaboration and cooperation by and between funders to address the needs of women artists and what might be done to promote more collaboration and cooperation in address their needs Judi I believe that grant seekers are connecting the dots between funders more quickly than philanthropies are at this point A local elected official in Louisville for example commissioned an artist in her neighborhood Ramona Dallum Lindsey to transform an abandoned apartment building into a symbol of the rebirth of their distressed community By doing this work the artist learned about KFW and subsequently applied for and received a grant for her studio work Some national foundations are beginning to be more intentional about reaching out to artists in states like Kentucky The Joan Mitchell Foundation in New York for example identifies nominators across the US to submit names for their Painters and Sculptors Grant Program In 2013 talented painter and KFW grantee Gaela Erwin received one of their 25 000 grants KFW staff works with independent peer panels to make recommendations about funding decisions to our Board of Directors We often ask foundations who share our mission like the Leeway Foundation to recommend artists to participate on our review panels It takes time energy and respect for artists and cultural workers in a wide variety of locations and contexts to make collaboration work but these are encouraging signs of what can be done Barry Are you satisfied with the level of focus on feminist artists in the burgeoning field of art and social change and what more needs to be done to insure that women artists are fully seated at the table where art and social change is discussed Judi Thanks for asking this question because it is an important one but I would like to widen it to include all practitioners having access to that table I believe that it is crucially important for artists and cultural workers from all backgrounds to be included in discussions about funding especially when the subject is social change However some funders are not comfortable with those who may be or become grantseekers as part of their discussions The newly formed Art Culture and Social Justice Network that I am part of welcomes practitioners as well as funders in their discussions The Steering Committee includes strong women artists such as Tufara Waller Muhammad a cultural organizer for the Highlander Center The best way to make sure feminist artists are at the table is to work for equal access for all Barry What role ought feminist artists who are committed to social change play in the overall placemaking efforts of the arts Are feminist artists seated at those tables Judi Feminist artists in Kentucky are doing the hard work of placemaking in their communities every day with very little funding or recognition from mainstream power brokers For example Arwen Donahue is creating an on going online journal which also includes sketches about her life on a family farm in a small rural community She is also doing a series of oral history interviews exploring the work of Kentucky s agrarian writers Her work is not only placemaking in her home community but also about making the power of rural art and cultural more visible nationally and globally Roberto Bedoya Executive Director of the Tucson Pima Arts Council has made great contributions to the field with his thoughtful analysis of placemaking An important theme in Beodya s work is placemaking and the politics of belonging Kentucky writer bell hooks also writes about belonging a culture of place and the theme is explored in Arwen Donohue s journal In my experience much of the current national placemaking efforts are funder driven and disconnected from many artists and cultural workers at the community level These funder led initiatives have their own economic systems and leadership that too often do not often intersect or support the work that feminist social change artists are doing in their communities Barry Who are the leaders of the movement to support women artists and are they carrying forth that banner effectively Judi First and foremost I salute Martha Richards of WomenArts who truly has worked tirelessly in the fields of arts and women s philanthropy locally and nationally to hold up the importance of supporting women artists For example she is the brain behind the idea of SWAN Day Support Women Artists Now a day devoted to locally organized celebrations of women s culture and creativity There have been more than 1 000 events in 23 countries since Martha invented SWAN Day seven years ago Philanthropic siloes have created largely separate fields for funding the arts and funding women As far as I know the Kentucky Foundation for Women and our sister fund the Leeway Foundation led by Denise Brown are the only two philanthropic organizations in the US entirely focused on funding women and the arts WomenArts is not yet a grantmaking organization Denise Brown and I are both active in the Art Culture and Social Justice Network As you have given me the opportunity to say throughout this interview I believe the most effective way to advance equitable funding for women artists is to work for equitable funding for all artists Barry What are the qualities of leadership that we need more of in our field What makes for an effective leader Judi I had the honor of co editing a book about the most effective leader I know Helen Matthews Lewis Living Social Justice in Appalachia Helen took part in the YWCA s desegregation efforts in Georgia in the 1940s earned a Ph D in sociology and spoke out against the environmental devastation of Appalachia in the 50 s and 60s inspired the development of Appalachian studies in the 70s and worked at the Appalshop arts and education center and the Highlander Research and Education Center in the 80s and 90s Although now retired Helen still writes and speaks out for social justice for example calling for a moral economy for Appalachia Helen sets high standards for effective leadership in all fields and enacts the qualities I think we need more of in our own Here are a few humility faith in the power of all people to make their lives better given equal opportunities a strong moral compass sense of humor focus on achieving social change rather than recognition Plus she is a great cook likes to travel and loves to dance What more can I say Barry You ve talked before about scale as being principally governed by local factors and that it ought to be considered and judged on those local considerations But in a wider sense how do we move support for individual artists all artists to a much larger support base Is such widespread support merely an aggregation of localized efforts or is it something bigger and more complex Judi Great question My theory of social change is that lasting transformational change must begin at the local level and cannot happen top down I wrote a book on a small committee of men who wanted to abolish the British slave trade in 1784 when very few people agreed Four of them lived to see Parliament vote to end the trade in 1807 Transformational change from the bottom up is not just about aggregating localized efforts although that is a very important step A bigger part of the equation is about building connecting and transforming at every level of engagement Margaret Mead perhaps most famously never doubted that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens could change the world To quote Ken Wilson again the Christensen Fund operates globally but understands that you don t get transformational results without engaging at the community level The Seventh Generation Fund operates globally by connecting indigenous people around the world working for local change Regional social justice organizations like Appalshop Alternate ROOTS and the Highlander Research and Education Center play major roles in building transformational connections throughout the South and other parts of the nation and world The process of connecting localities involves identifying shared structural inequities and finding synergies For example demonstrating how building a for profit prison in Appalachia affected Hawaiian women who were housed there Arts and Democracy is a decentralized network that works nationally to build the growing movement linking arts and culture participatory democracy and social justice Through their network building approach they are connecting community based creative practice with policymaking and systemic change Barry What successes yours or those of others gives you optimism that there is meaningful understanding and support for the value of artists and the arts in America Judi I am very optimistic about meaningful change through arts and culture in our country Here are three great examples The Detroit based Allied Media Projects AMP cultivates media strategies for a more just creative and collaborative world And they also work in a way that honors community based and intergenerational work MicroFest USA presented by the Network of Ensemble Theatres a series of four local explorations of the similarities and differences in place based artmaking advancing social justice in Detroit Appalachia New Orleans and Hawaii Junebug Theatre s 50th anniversary of The Free Southern Theatre designed by John O Neal Doris Derby and Gilbert Moses as a cultural and educational extension of the Civil Rights movement in the US South Who knew that Roscoe Orman who plays Gordon on Sesame Street was one of the courageous actors in the early days of the theatre Barry Conversely what worries you most about the continued marginalization of the value of the arts by the American public Judi I am most worried about the corporatization of more and more aspects of American life Fueled by consumerism and out and out greed corporatization seeps forward into government services higher education health care and even the nonprofit sector I am proud to say community based arts and culture is a major site of resistance to these pernicious corporatizing processes Barry There are programs out there that are trying to nurture and support young women in their pursuit of an artistic career The League of American Orchestras newly announced initiative to increase early career women composers through a series of orchestral readings and commissions in cooperation with Ear Shot and funded by the Virginia B Toulmin Foundation Program for Commissioning Women in the Performing Arts being but one specific example What other notable projects would you cite as focusing on young women artists and what is being done to try to provide mentorship of those younger women by the more established women artists in the field Judi Hurray for the Viriginia B Toulmin Foundation That is an exciting new program Most of the mentoring programs for women artists that I know about are field based rather than funder based This is another good reason why it is important for funders to interact with the field A few strong discipline based programs that I know about are Women Make Movies the International Center for Women Playwrights and the Institute for the Study of Women Gender in the Arts and Media at Columbia College in Chicago Anticipating your next question to some extent I would like to put in a plug for youth based programs like The Kentucky Center Governor s Schools for the Arts Although this program is not focused on girls only I see many young feminists finding their voices deepening their artistry and embracing their identities as artists and cultural workers through the opportunity to interact with peers who appreciate their talents The Appalachian Media Institute at Appalshop provides young people in the coalfields with opportunities to tell the stories that matter to them The Institute focuses on how young people can be engaged in their communities and advance positive social change through place based mediamaking Barry Do feminist artists of social change have a role in arts education and what is that role Judi Yes definitely Many artists and cultural bearers who receive grants from KFW s Art Meets Activism program are doing arts education both inside and outside schools By this time you probably won t be surprised to hear that I believe this kind of intergenerational arts interaction is most powerful at the community level Here are a few examples A teacher started an after school writing program for middle school girls who write about and discuss such important issues as bullying anger management relationships and compassion In an Appalachian area of Kentucky two feminists are conducting monthly Artisan Women Retreats community gatherings focused on learning more about the craft traditions like quiltmaking and gourd art that have long defined the region but are in danger of disappearing with the current generation of elders In far western Kentucky a classically trained teacher at a regional university is bringing together young dancers of all levels of physical ability from rural schools and communities to create public performances that build bridges through dance Barry Assess the current situation in research and data collection as the same relates to women artists and feminist artists What kinds of information and data do we need more of and what advice do you have for the arts research community Judi There is a huge dearth of demographic information including race and gender relating to arts and cultural funding in this country Moreover individuals small organizations and fiscal agents are not included in large scale data collection The arts research community could work with local funders and state arts agencies to collect a wider spectrum of information relating to all artists and to grantmaking with awards of less than 10 000 National arts and cultural policymaking efforts are incomplete without this information How can we even have a meaningful national conversation about equity and appropriate levels of scale without this information Barry In the earliest days of the modern feminist movement a percentage of men and women too were put off and threatened by the rhetoric One might argue that we ve come a long way but it is still a white male dominated society so one might also argue that the progress has been slow and marginal What is your take on how far we have come and how far we have to go Judi Yes I know feminist rhetoric has sometimes been off putting Many women of my generation including me learned that the hard way In the 1970s some of us hurt and alienated our middle class friends who gave up their careers to stay home with their children only to feel devalued

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/03/interview-with-judi-jennings.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: What Came First: The Chicken or the Egg; The Question or the Answer
    because I want the enjoyment of convivial conversation Despite the reality that the conversation is more often than not mundane and centers on simply catching up with each other s lives or talking on superficial levels about current happenings locally or globally it is the interchange with other people that complements the meal And every once in awhile the conversation is even substantive and yields new thoughts and thinking How can you listen better if there is no dialogue at all I am sure this is probably just a trendy gimmick of the moment an indulgence sure to pass Too bad the obligation of silence that governs most arts venues is not also a momentary trend rather than the sacrosanct condition of entrance that it has become but that is a whole other subject Yet the idea intrigues me if for no other reason than it is something out of the ordinary I imagine transferring that idea to our attempts to deal with our problems What if for example you had a meeting wherein a power point presentation focused on a challenge and tried to highlight the various component parts of that challenge setting forth what was known about the problem and what it was doing to the things you value but no one said anything What if you then reconvened the meeting attendees a day later and then focused on simply asking questions about the problem with no one talking about any possible solutions I wonder if that might be an interesting experiment that might later yield some new thinking on how to approach the problem I wonder if the shift from what one has to say to not saying anything at all would alter the processes of how we think about things What if you had a conference session that took that approach A problem and all its various attributes is presented in pictures and on screen words but no one says anything Then the same people reconvene the next day and try to figure out what questions need to be asked before discussing ideas to address the problem Would Day 2 end up a more productive session Does it make any sense to experiment with ways to break with patterns of thinking as a precursor to arriving at smart questions that ought to be asked before any attempt to settle on possible solutions to problems I worry sometimes that we in the arts are engaging too much in a nation building approach to the challenges we face Rather than question who we are what we do and why we embrace strategies that seek to change the external environment focusing the solution on the world outside of ourselves We try to apply and impose our own critical judgments and conclusions on the outside world and mold that external reality to what we envision as the ideal I am not a fan of foreign policy nation building efforts and believe that from Vietnam to Iraq to Afghanistan our attempts

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/03/what-came-first-chicken-or-egg-question.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Barry's Blog: 2014 Symposium on Creativity and Innovation in Public Education - Impressions from the Attendees
    with tools to apply and adapt as they are confronted with challenges and opportunities James Catterall named this Means in his presentation Gerald Richards described how his organization 826 National imparts writing skills that participating children can then manipulate toward creative ends Similarly Lorne Buchman emphasized the level of aesthetic and technical skill students entering Art Center College of Design must demonstrate through their portfolio to simply achieve admission Once admitted they continue acquiring skills and practice application of their skills to form focused problem solving In addition to the vertical achievement of specialized skills developing a breadth of experience and knowledge from other disciplines will extend the range of creative output a person can achieve This was most explicitly highlighted by Professor Robert Root Bernstein s presentation on the polymath nature of Nobel and MacArther Award winners Particularly in the sciences these award winners have experience and training in many more subjects including the arts at much higher percentage rates than non winners in their same filed The data he and his research partner and wife Michelle offer may be the most compelling we have for promoting STEAM education instead of STEM One factor that didn t include evidence to suggest its importance to exercising creativity but must not be ignored is empathy Lorne Bachman highlighted this late in the day when he added that Art Center College of Design expects its students to study the humanities and human experience so they are practiced at exercising empathy even as they problem solve Days after the WESTAF symposium Yo Yo Ma answered questions at Harvard s Kennedy School and affirmed the key points I took away from the Symposium He spoke of how easy playing the cello was for him even as a child and this motivated him to solve technical problems on his own He spoke of learning the importance of moving past technique to discovering his own sound on the instrument He advised the students in attendance to lift their heads out of the specific specialty they were pursing so they could see and participate in the wider world around them Finally he described how his sensitivity to different cultural experiences and points of view was developed through his study of anthropology while an undergraduate even as he continued to study music https forum iop harvard edu content cultural citizenship Bill O Brien of the NEA pointed out at the symposium that Trying to isolate the impact of arts education without reference to the larger system is to miss the point of its integrated presence I believe the same is true of creativity I encourage us to stop wondering if we are successfully teaching creativity Creativity needn t be taught All people are creative Children need to be given the tools and experiences necessary for practicing creativity This means ensuring every child discovers what motivates them has opportunities to develop their skills to the highest degree possible in this motivating activity is stretched to learn skills and have experiences in a variety of additional subjects and has exposure to the breadth of human experience so they develop the empathy necessary to apply their creativity to the benefit of society and the world Making this happen requires us all to reach new heights with our own of creativity Cora Mirikitani President and CEO Center for Cultural Innovation www cciarts org I was pleased to attend the full day WESTAF cultural policy symposium on Creativity and Innovation in Public Education on March 4 2014 at the Frank Gehry Partners LLC studio in Los Angeles This was the 15th such symposium convened by WESTAF designed to bring scholars and practitioners together to offer critical thinking and exchange on intractable issues in the arts The format of the day was organized around 14 key presenters primarily scholars sharing knowledge and perspectives about research and policy work needed to advance creativity and innovation in public education Roughly 60 observers including me also crowded into the room to hear the proceedings first hand along with a substantial virtual audience beaming in via a live streaming webcast courtesy of the California Arts Council and Charter Communications With so many arts people in the audience it was interesting to hear the discussion framed under the banner of creativity and not the arts per se as there are many in our field who still think of these as synonymous they aren t With a topic so large the conversation was often dense but always rich offering up many nuggets of information and interesting takeaways Here are just a few There isn t full agreement on the definition of creativity but a critical mass of scientific and research based evidence is emerging demonstrating creativity as a key factor in good educational outcomes Developing educational policies and practices promoting creativity is hard because individual creativity often goes against the norm threatens power and lives at the edge of chaos a disruptive state that is unwelcomed by most educational and political institutions Universal systems for evaluating and measuring the impact of creativity in education are not in place hindering policy development and necessary advocacy efforts with parents boards of education and legislators At the same time there is on the ground evidence that artists and the arts are successfully creating innovative products community engagement and social outcomes often accelerated by innovative collaborations between the arts science and technology There is admittedly a huge amount of information to digest in order to fully wrap your brain around this discussion Happily WESTAF plans to publish the proceedings from this symposium as they have in the past and I was informed by Anthony Radich that presentations captured from the live streaming broadcast may be posted on the WESTAF website as well Did we solve any problems at the symposium Not really But to paraphrase one participant because communication among the scholars and stakeholders in this issue has been a problem convenings like this play an important role in moving the dialogue forward Joe

    Original URL path: http://blog.westaf.org/2014/03/2014-symposium-on-creativity-and.html (2016-05-01)
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