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  • Russia-USA Wetland Center Exchange Program - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    social media data sharing and outreach materials are valuable tools for achieving education and outreach goals within the outdoor and environmental education fields Participating wetland centers will be asked to share examples and assist in the creation of a proven methodology for successful usage of social media such as Facebook VKontakte Odnoklassniki Twitter Skype Instagram Four Square Pinterest data sharing tools such as organization websites Google Docs Dropbox and outreach materials such as leaflets brochures static and dynamic displays as a way to best engage the surrounding community and schools in wetland education Selected centers will explore different techniques and strategies regarding public education programs volunteer coordination wetland field studies nature interpretation exhibit creation formal education programs and other common themes and or challenges shared by selected wetland centers It is intended that the best of these techniques and strategies will be compiled uploaded and shared on TWI WLI and WIR websites for broader international dissemination of this proven methodology for the effective use of social media data sharing and outreach materials Manual for Integrating Proven Techniques into Public Education and Engagement at Wetland Centers Based on shared US and Russian experiences through the international exchange program conference and webinar workshops a final manual will be produced for advising wetland education centers in both the US and Russia on implementing best practices and proven techniques for public education and engagement as they pertain to wetland education The manual will be available in both Russian and English will be useful to wetland center practitioners across the globe and will work to highlight wetland issues that are common to not only the US and Russia but countries around the world and will complement the existing Handbook on Best Practices for Planning Design and Operation of Wetland Education Centres For more information on the participating project partners please visit our websites at Wetland Link International WLI www wli org uk Wetlands International Russia WIR www russia wetlands org Read more Show less Note The presentation below is set to transition automatically after 10 seconds Russia USA Wetland Center Exchange Program 6 months ago Check out the Russia USA Wetland Center Exchange Program article written by project partner Wetland Link International In the coming days stay tuned for more conference photos See More See Less US Russia Wetland Centre Exchange Wetland Link International wli wwt org uk The final workshop for our Russian US wetland centre exchange programme took place 19th to the 21st October at The Wetlands Institute Stone Harbour New Jersey US Three WLI member centres from the US and three from Russia exchanged staff to spend time learning about how each other View on Facebook Share Likes 2 Shares 2 Comments 0 Joyce Campbell Ferguson and Kelli Boylen like this Comment on Facebook Russia USA Wetland Center Exchange Program 6 months ago Come meet our partners at The Wetlands Institute tomorrow night the Open House event starts at 6 30pm See More See Less Russia USA Exchange Program Open House Oct

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/education/russia-usa-wetland-center-exchange-program/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Summer Nature Program The Wetlands Institute
    August 15 2016 Children ages 4 5 attend programs daily from 9 30am 12 00pm and children ages 6 13 attend programs daily from 9 30am 2 00pm Summer 2016 Registration is Here Spaces fill up quickly so register today Download Registration Packet Pricing and age level availability vary by week Please download a registration packet for complete details Questions About What To Expect Each Week Download FAQ Procedures for Full Week or Download FAQ Procedures for Short Week Additional Questions Call 609 368 1211 Summer 2016 Program Themes and Dates July 6 8 2016 Wednesday Friday Theme Color My World with Nature What color is nature It s more than just green trees blue sky and muddy browns Color displays and color changes play a big role in the survival of wildlife warning hiding attracting attention communication and many more Let s find examples and play with colors in nature July 11 15 2016 Monday Friday Theme Explore the Shore One World Ocean There s so much ocean out there why is our planet called Earth The ocean feeds us changes our weather and it s where more than 90 of the life on this planet lives We ll be exploring the depths riding the tides and making waves of discoveries as we dive into the one ocean that connects us all Bring your creative juices the week we ll be working on our project for the 4H Fair Age 5 field trip to Cape May Zoo Ages 6 13 field trip to the Stockton Marine Lab tentative July 18 22 2016 Monday Friday Theme Crabulous Crab Week Calling all hands Get the pinch on crusty crustaceans in our Shrimp Lobster and Crab Labs And we ll even examine a crab that s not a crab at all Can you guess which animal that is Join us and find out Age 5 field trip to Cape May Zoo Ages 6 13 field trip to Douglas Beach and a Behind the Scenes Tour of the Lobster House July 25 29 2016 Monday Friday Theme Marine Mammal Madness Sea Life s Web Beams of sunlight join all life in the ocean Get connected as we weave our way around the watery food web from the tiniest plankton to the humongous hungry whales Age 5 field trip to Cape May Zoo Ages 6 13 field trip to Cape May Point State Park and a special whale and dolphin watching boat trip at the Cape May Whale and Research Center August 1 5 2016 Monday Friday Theme Wild Wetlands Turtles fish snails and crabs are just a few animals that live in freshwater and saltwater wetlands Pull up your boots and become a Wetlands Wonderer as we wade in searching for all sorts of wild life learning about their wet habits in their watery habitats from the forest to the sea Age 5 field trip to Cape May Zoo Ages 6 13 field trip to Belleplain State Forest August 8 12 2016 Monday

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/education/summer-nature-program/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Summer Internship Opportunities - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    interest in environmental or outdoor education and or classroom science education and have completed at least two years of college In this internship you ll work inside and outside with visitors of all ages on land and mud and water and boats and with live animals As a Wetlands Institute education intern you ll work hard never be bored and develop the skills you need to continue your career in the education interpretive field Education interns have a regular 40 hour week schedule usually 9 00 a m to 5 00 p m or 11 00 a m 7 00 p m working five days a week one weekend day and evening included Some of the jobs our interns will take on include Educational Salt Marsh Safari Walks Fishing Seining and Crabbing Programs B ack bay Kayak and Boat Tours Aquarium Feeding Programs Daily Creature Feature Presentations Interpretive Dune Beach and Nature Walks Summer Nature Programs Local Outreach Events School Programs Coordinating Special Events Each intern will also work on one major project such as creating a new publication or exhibit or developing a web page Interns helped create the Jersey Island Blueway paddling trail created a Google Earth interactive Salt Marsh Safari and developed new public programs and resource packets for schoolteachers and summer nature program instructors Education interns often find time to work with research interns in such projects as the horseshoe crab census shore bird banding and turtle conservation initiatives Length of Internship Interns work from mid late May to mid late August Specific dates are somewhat flexible to suit varying schedules Stipend 160 week Housing may be available Application Process To apply please submit a complete application package which includes cover letter resume and completed internship application form to Brooke Knapick via email or US postal

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/education/internship-opportunities/ (2016-04-29)
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  • 2015 Intern Symposium - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    Opportunities for Schools Scout Groups Homeschool Programs Group Outreach Programs Russia USA Wetland Center Exchange Program Summer Nature Program Summer Internship Opportunities 2015 Intern Symposium Osprey Camera Conservation Adopt A Terrapin Terrapin Conservation Terrapins What to do 25 Years of Terrapin Conservation and Research Bill to Reclassify Terrapins as Non game Species Terrapin Road Patrol Statistics Terrapins and Traps Terrapin Learning Activities 2011 Annual Report Excluder Devices Adopt A Terrapin Building Terrapin Barriers and Fences Monofilament Recycling Station Program Horseshoe Crab Conservation reTURN the Favor Conservation in Action Horseshoe Crab Spawning Surveys Response to Public Comment Post Sandy Emergency Restoration Adopt A Horseshoe Crab Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary Restoration Junior Duck Stamps Bird Sightings at the WI New Jersey Adubon s World Series of Birding Online Pledge Form Donate a Fixed Amount Native Gardening and Landscaping Research Current and Past Programs Coastal Conservation Research Program 2015 Intern Symposium Partners Sponsors Stone Harbor Point Restoration Project Academic Affiliations of Student Researchers Asian Scholarship Program 2000 2010 Diamondback Terrapins Visit Us 2015 Intern Symposium The 2015 Intern Symposium was held on August 3 at The Wetlands Institute This year s symposium jointly highlighted the achievements of interns with the Coastal Conservation Research Program and Environmental Education Intern Program The 2015 Citizen Conservationist Award was also presented to Donna Rothman To see the symposium program and read abstracts click here Email Updates Stay informed by signing up for our email updates Sign Up Now Recent Posts Front Desk Retail Sales May through September Great News for Terrapins A Record Breaking Sanderling Two Nations for One Wetlands 25 Years of Protecting Diamondback Terrapins The Wetlands Institute Community The Wetlands Institute is a proud founding member of EarthShare New Jersey the only environmental federation for workplace giving in the state If you re a federal

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/education/internship-opportunities/2015-intern-symposium/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Osprey Camera The Wetlands Institute
    17 15 Hop hop hop Our chick has been spending a lot of time hopping up and down around the nest learning the first steps in flying We know it can be challenging to see the little chick in the nest with all the condensation and natural elements on the camera lens but with the chick so close to fledging it would not be wise of us to disrupt the young chick and adult pair this late in the season Stay tuned and watch for increased hopping and wing flapping action in the coming days 8 12 15 Five weeks old today and growing stronger each day In fact in just one more week our chick will be full grown and is already showing signs of independence It is beginning to explore around the edges of the nest was observed picking up smaller sticks in the nest and rearranging them along the perimeter and is even trusted by the parents to be left alone in the nest for short periods of time It s amazing how quickly they learn 8 3 15 Our chick s down is quickly being replaced by feathers Look closely and you can see the flight and tail feathers beginning to emerge Feathers attached to the hand of the osprey are known as primaries feathers attached to the forearm are known as secondaries and feathers attached to the tailbone are know as rectrices Our chick is changing so quickly these days so be sure to tune in daily 7 29 15 Our second osprey chick is exactly 3 weeks old today You can see just how much it has grown since the last photo taken on 7 17 15 In just 3 more weeks it will be almost full grown From there watch for it to fledge about 2 4 weeks later around September 2 16 This is late in the season for chicks to fledge but we are hopeful for success 7 27 15 After a couple weeks of practice and a few learning curves this pair is providing their chick with great care They have been observed securing and fortifying the edges of the nest guarding and protecting the chick and feeding it daily meals of eel flounder and other fish While Papa osprey continues to bring man made objects into the nest Mama osprey does a nice job of moving them to the sides of the nest protecting their chick from harm Keep up the good work you two 7 14 15 The first chick to hatch did not survive more than a day The third egg was last confirmed yesterday and was still being incubated though it had passed its expected hatch date By the end of the day the egg was no longer visible and may be covered by nest material or may have been removed from the nest Thankfully our second chick continues to get stronger each day with close attention by both parents its meal delivery dad and feeding

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/education/osprey-camera/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Conservation - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    problem Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others Theodore Roosevelt 1 Since its beginning The Wetlands Institute s programs have been centered around that central proposition Our Education programs whether on site in the schools aboard sea going vessels or in our lecture hall teach the value of stewardship i e taking care of our natural environment so that it may continue to sustain us Our Research and Conservation programs not only teach techniques of conservation the participants practice conservation Our scientists have combined their efforts with other groups to monitor horseshoe crab populations in the Delaware Bay and the Institute has supported moratoria on over harvesting of horseshoe crabs We have conducted surveys of the fishes of Hereford Inlet and measured the impacts of mechanized beach cleaning on southern New Jersey beaches We have been recognized as a world leader in conservation of the diamondback terrapin a signature species for us Many years of field research by our scientists convincingly demonstrated that commercial crab traps were unnecessarily drowning thousands of terrapins That research supported the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection s regulations requiring Bycatch Reduction Devices BRDs on commercial crab traps2 regulations that have been repeated elsewhere in the U S Another activity that has brought the stewardship principle into communities everywhere is the Institute s Terrapin Rescue program where thousands of eggs have been harvested from road killed terrapins incubated hatched and fed until attaining a size that enables them to return to the wild The program is supported in part by school children who sell Turtle Cookies One of the most momentous days in their lives is when they get to release their turtles to their native habitat The Institute pioneered the development of terrain barrier fences to reduce

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/conservation/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Terrapin Conservation - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    Conservation Research Program 2015 Intern Symposium Partners Sponsors Stone Harbor Point Restoration Project Academic Affiliations of Student Researchers Asian Scholarship Program 2000 2010 Diamondback Terrapins Visit Us Terrapin Conservation Since 1989 the Wetlands Institute in cooperation with the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey has conducted a diamondback terrapin conservation project Each summer college and university students come from all over the United States to assist these creatures For well over a century diamondback terrapins the only species adapted to life in the brackish waters of coastal salt marshes have been adversely affected by a variety of human activities A century ago overhunting of the northernback terrapin Malaclemys terrapin terrapin considered a gourmet delicacy nearly extirpated populations in many parts of its range Eventually the combined effects of Prohibition sherry was considered an essential ingredient of terrapin stew recipes and the economic stresses of the Great Depression in the 1930s brought an end to significant commercial exploitation of terrapins It was not until nearly the 1960s that terrapin populations recovered to a level approaching their former pre gourmet abundance More recently however two other threats to terrapin populations have arisen Coastal development has led to considerable habitat destruction especially of traditional nesting sites on barrier beach islands Along the Atlantic coast of New Jersey the search for alternative nesting sites on highway embankments has resulted in large numbers of roadkills every nesting season And the loss of terrapins to the commercial crabbing industry through drowning in crab traps has increased dramatically The serious decline in southern New Jersey s terrapin population due to increased mortality from roadkills and drowning in crab traps prompted the launching of the Terrapin Recovery Conservation Program in 1989 Under the direction of Dr Roger Wood the program has developed techniques to incubate and hatch eggs

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/conservation/terrapin-conservation/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Terrapins — What to do? - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    the Favor Conservation in Action Horseshoe Crab Spawning Surveys Response to Public Comment Post Sandy Emergency Restoration Adopt A Horseshoe Crab Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary Restoration Junior Duck Stamps Bird Sightings at the WI New Jersey Adubon s World Series of Birding Online Pledge Form Donate a Fixed Amount Native Gardening and Landscaping Research Current and Past Programs Coastal Conservation Research Program 2015 Intern Symposium Partners Sponsors Stone Harbor Point Restoration Project Academic Affiliations of Student Researchers Asian Scholarship Program 2000 2010 Diamondback Terrapins Visit Us Terrapins What to do Protecting our local environment is most effective when it is a community wide effort Thank you to everyone who is doing their part Please remember Terrapins are wild animals please leave them in their wild homes If you find an injured terrapin call The Wetlands Institute at 609 368 1211 with any questions There s a hatchling terrapin Unless the terrapin is in a life threatening situation please leave it alone If it is in danger Take the terrapin to the nearest salt marsh Release it underneath the fallen grasses along the marsh not in the water There s a terrapin on the road Wait for the terrapin to cross or carefully help her cross in the direction she is going She may have eggs so be gentle If the terrapin is injured gently place her in a box and call us There s a terrapin nesting in my yard Quietly observe her from afar She is easily frightened Leave the nest site undisturbed Additional Information 25 Years of Terrapin Conservation and Research Bill to Reclassify Terrapins as Non game Species Terrapin Learning Activities Terrapins and Tires Terrapins and Traps Terrapin Rescue Project 2011 Annual Report on the Terrapin Education and Conservation Project Excluder devices on commercial crab traps Adopt

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/conservation/terrapin-conservation/terrapins-what-to-do/ (2016-04-29)
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