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  • Monofilament Recycling Station Program - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    monofilament line is the most commonly used form of fishing line on the market today This line type is very popular amongst anglers as it comes in a range of diameters or test strengths that can be used for a wide variety of targeted fish Unfortunately either by accident or through neglect some of this monofilament line can make its way into our waterways In fact this fishing line is one of the ocean s most persistent forms of pollution as for example 10 000 feet of fishing line was collected from Hartford Pier Southern California alone in 2007 Unfortunately monofilament fishing line lost to the natural environment can stay around for a while as the material takes over 600 years to decompose This monofilament line not only spends a long time in the environment but can also be very hazardous to marine life bird life scuba divers and even boat propellers There are two ways in which monofilament line can be harmful to animal life entanglement or ingestion In an effort to reduce the amount of monofilament fishing line that ends up in our local waterways The Wetlands Institute has aligned efforts with Boat U S Foundation s Reel In And Recycle Monofilament Recycling Program Wetlands Institute staff and volunteers have installed an initial batch of 12 monofilament recycling stations at local marinas fishing piers and tackle shops throughout Southern New Jersey In an effort to properly dispose of the material keeping it out of landfills the Wetlands Institute is responsible for maintaining these recycling stations and disposing of the monofilament line on a regular basis Monofilament line collected by The Wetlands Institute is sent to the Berkeley Conservation Institute http www berkley fishing com about berkley conservation institute who recycles the material as they melt the line down

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/conservation/monofilament-recycling-station-program/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Horseshoe Crab Conservation - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    fossils the last survivors of a group of organisms that first appeared in the fossil record some 30 million years ago Delaware Bay has the largest population of horseshoe crabs Limulus polyphemus in the world Besides their extraordinary antiquity horseshoe crabs are also of paramount importance to human health Their blood contains a clotting agent LAL Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate which provides a fast reliable test for the presence of infections bacteria in drugs as well as prosthetic devices such as heart valves and hip replacements Since 1991 the Wetlands Institute has brought scientists and volunteer citizens together to conduct censuses of the ecologically vital horseshoe crab population on the New Jersey side of the Delaware Bay These censuses take place during May and June and are central to our understanding and responsible management of this ancient marine creature The Horseshoe Crab Conservation The Horseshoe Crab an important keystone species of the Delaware Bay is an animal that is very much depended upon by many other species participating in the ecosystem Shorebirds such as the Red Knot Calidris canutus Ruddy Turnstone Arenaria interpres and the Sanderling Calidris alba depend upon Horseshoe Crab eggs deposited along the banks of the Delaware Bay for their own nutritional welfare Horseshoe Crab Eggs Some of these shorebirds make a 9 000 mile migration from their wintering grounds along the southern tip of South America to their breeding grounds in the Arctic tundra Their journey is timed so they can take a rest along the shore of the Delaware Bay in order to feast upon this large concentration of Horseshoe Crab eggs Shorebirds will spend approximately 2 weeks dining on the eggs in order to double their body weight and replenish the fuel reserves needed to continue with their long journey to the Arctic Unfortunately this natural phenomenon is in peril as the number of Horseshoe Crabs in the Delaware Bay has dramatically decreased over time Horseshoe Crab Hatchlings In fact the Delaware Bay s Horseshoe Crab population has declined by 90 over the last 15 years mostly due to overharvesting and habitat degredation As the number of Horseshoe Crabs have decreased so have the number of eggs available for consumption by migrating shorebirds Shorebird population numbers are therefore plummeting as well as many cannot gain the amount of energy needed to complete their migrations The Red Knot has been placed on New Jersey s Endangered Species list and many other shorebirds are in danger of being placed on that list if horseshoe crab populations are unable to rebound Horseshoe Crab Adults In an effort to address the Delaware Bay Horseshoe Crab situation The Wetlands Institute has embarked on a statewide partnership project to support the stewardship and conservation of Horseshoe Crab populations in New Jersey As part of this partnership The Wetlands Institute collects fertilized Horseshoe Crab eggs with the proper permits from spawning beaches along the Delaware Bay and rears the eggs under controlled conditions in our aquarium After about a month eggs hatch

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/conservation/horseshoe-crab-conservation/ (2016-04-29)
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  • reTURN the Favor - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    Post Sandy Emergency Restoration Adopt A Horseshoe Crab Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary Restoration Junior Duck Stamps Bird Sightings at the WI New Jersey Adubon s World Series of Birding Online Pledge Form Donate a Fixed Amount Native Gardening and Landscaping Research Current and Past Programs Coastal Conservation Research Program 2015 Intern Symposium Partners Sponsors Stone Harbor Point Restoration Project Academic Affiliations of Student Researchers Asian Scholarship Program 2000 2010 Diamondback Terrapins Visit Us reTURN the Favor Mission Statement reTURN the Favor is a collaborative effort that enables organized volunteer groups to save Horseshoe Crabs stranded on New Jersey s seasonally closed and open beaches The Wetlands Institute is a leading partner in the multi partner reTURN the Favor program This program works to rescue overturned or impinged Horseshoe Crabs stranded on New Jersey s Delaware Bay beaches Though this program works to rescue Horseshoe Crabs on beaches open to the public it primarily concentrates on rescuing crabs stranded on beach areas seasonally closed during shorebird migration and the Horseshoe Crab spawning season occurring in May and June In New Jersey Horseshoe Crabs are protected by a moratorium The reTURN the Favor program works closely with the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife so that stranded Horseshoe Crabs can be rescued by sanctioned volunteer groups in a legal way These groups only enter closed beaches between sunset and sunrise and only when shorebirds are not present They do not remove any crabs alive or dead from the beach The Wetlands Institute hosts a number of scheduled public reTURN the Favor volunteer walks on local beaches during May June and July If you are interested in signing up for a walk with The Wetlands Institute or another partnering organization or if you d like to learn more about the program please

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/conservation/horseshoe-crab-conservation/re-turn-the-favor/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Conservation in Action! - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    and Traps Terrapin Learning Activities 2011 Annual Report Excluder Devices Adopt A Terrapin Building Terrapin Barriers and Fences Monofilament Recycling Station Program Horseshoe Crab Conservation reTURN the Favor Conservation in Action Horseshoe Crab Spawning Surveys Response to Public Comment Post Sandy Emergency Restoration Adopt A Horseshoe Crab Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary Restoration Junior Duck Stamps Bird Sightings at the WI New Jersey Adubon s World Series of Birding Online Pledge Form Donate a Fixed Amount Native Gardening and Landscaping Research Current and Past Programs Coastal Conservation Research Program 2015 Intern Symposium Partners Sponsors Stone Harbor Point Restoration Project Academic Affiliations of Student Researchers Asian Scholarship Program 2000 2010 Diamondback Terrapins Visit Us Conservation in Action Be part of the solution Join us to help out Each spring hundreds of thousands of horseshoe crabs come ashore to lay their eggs on Atlantic coast and Delaware Bay beaches While coming ashore many of these harmless animals accidentally become flipped over by waves or become trapped in jetties or behind bulkheads Thousands of horseshoe crabs die each season due to stranding Turning crabs back onto their proper side will help reduce mortality from stranding This simple action helps the horseshoe crab population and migratory shorebirds that rely on the crabs for survival Click here for to find out more about the reTURN the Favor Program REMEMBER New Jersey has a moratorium on possession of horseshoe crabs so please DO NOT remove live or dead crabs from beaches Only sanctioned teams are allowed to rescue crabs on closed beaches Anyone can flip crabs on an open beach Additional Information Adopt A Horseshoe Crab Horseshoe Crab Spawning Surveys reTURN the Favor Response to Public Comment Post Sandy Emergency Restoration Email Updates Stay informed by signing up for our email updates Sign Up Now Recent Posts

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/conservation/horseshoe-crab-conservation/conservation-in-action/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Horseshoe Crab Spawning Surveys - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    Visit Us Horseshoe Crab Spawning Surveys Horseshoe Crab spawning survey on Delaware Bay beaches Since 1991 The Wetlands Institute has brought scientists and volunteers together to conduct surveys of horseshoe crabs spawning on New Jersey s Delaware Bay beaches These surveys take place during full and new moon phases during the months of May and June at the height of the spawning season During this time thousands of crabs crawl onto Delaware Bay beaches to lay their eggs in nests along the shoreline s high tide line Our horseshoe crab spawning surveys are coordinated with other groups in New Jersey and Delaware so that they are standardized and take place on the same dates and tides By taking snap shot counts of the number of horseshoe crabs spawning on Delaware Bay beaches scientists are able to gain insight to the Delaware Bay s horseshoe crab population status and trends Interested in Joining us for a Horseshoe Crab Spawning Survey We offer the opportunity for you to join Institute scientists on a 2 km walk along New Jersey s Delaware Bay beaches to count horseshoe crabs This activity lasts approximately 3 hours and is ideal for all age groups Group sizes are limited and advanced registration is required Please take time to review our instructions below on how to sign up where to meet and what to expect for this event 2016 Spawning Survey Dates Wednesday May 4 th Friday May 6 th Monday May 23rd Saturday June 4 th Monday June 6 th Saturday June 18 th Monday June 20 th How to sign up for a spawning survey To sign up for a spawning survey please click on the link provided below Please input your FIRST NAME in the white space and check off the date you wish to participate If you have more than 1 person in your group you MUST fill in a separate entry for each member of your group Ten individuals maximum are allowed to attend each survey Due to the high demand of this program we ask that individuals participate in ONE survey night per season After adding in your name and chosen date click save You will be asked to provide your email address and phone number This contact information will only be visible to The Wetlands Institute staff Phone numbers are needed in case of cancellation for severe weather events Villas Beach click here Where to Meet All survey participants must meet at The Wetlands Institute at the designated time date indicated on the sign up page The Wetlands Institute 1075 Stone Harbor Blvd Stone Harbor NJ What to Expect Volunteers will meet at The Wetlands Institute lab area use Institute side entrance to enter into the building to learn about the natural history of horseshoe crabs the Delaware Bay survey and survey methodology Following this 40 minute introduction volunteers will drive their personal vehicles to either the Villas beach site for the survey approx 20 minutes directions will be provided The

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/conservation/horseshoe-crab-conservation/horseshoe-crab-spawning-surveys/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Response to Public Comment - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    Stone Harbor NJ Although diamondback terrapin research and conservation is a focal point of the Wetlands Institute s efforts coastal and wetlands stewardship encompasses much more than one species The current addendum to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan ISFMP for Horseshoe Crabs is scheduled to expire in 2013 The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission requested public comment on the most recent draft addendum VII to the ISFMP for Horseshoe Crabs which will establish a management program for the Delaware Bay region Several of the management options suggested in the draft addendum would compromise protection of horseshoe crabs in the Delaware Bay region Provoked by the potential for horseshoe crabs to lose some degree of protection and inspired by the opportunity to help increase protection the Institute has submitted a comment to the ASMFC for their consideration The Institute s position statement is as follows Due to the uncertainty concerning the fate of ecologically linked and at risk species like horseshoe crabs marine sea turtles Red Knots and other migratory shorebirds we implore the Commission to implement an Addendum VII to the Interstate Fisheries Management Plan for Horseshoe Crabs that is responsible risk averse and focuses on the long term sustainable recovery of horseshoe crab populations within their entire range Such an approach requires that there should not be an allowable harvest of Delaware Bay origin horseshoe crabs under any circumstances until their populations rebound to historic levels Horseshoe crabs occupy a critical niche in both the ecology of Delaware Bay and human pharmacology They provide incalculable services and their popular decline has catastrophic implications Every feasible action to protect this at risk species should be taken The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission will review public comment and vote on Addendum VII on February 9 th in Alexandria Virginia The Institute

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/conservation/horseshoe-crab-conservation/response-to-public-comment/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Post-Sandy Emergency Restoration - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    of 50 70 aerial coverage of ideal Horseshoe Crab spawning habitat With Horseshoe Crab populations classified at an all time low population level with very few signs for recovery this reduction in adequate spawning area contributes an additional hardship for the Delaware Bay Horseshoe Crab population In some areas of the Delaware Bay shoreline the erosion of sand has exposed rubble creating biological impingement hazards to Horseshoe Crab spawning These beaches would otherwise provide suitable spawning habitat Rubble ranges from cedar pilings to small and large size concrete slabs These impingement hazards are further reducing the available suitable nesting areas for Horseshoe Crabs The culmination of sand loss and rubble material not only presents a large problem to the struggling Horseshoe Crab population but also presents an additional threat to Shorebird species such as Red Knots Calidris canutus Sanderlings Calidris alba and Ruddy Turnstones Arenaria interpres This lack of appropriate Horseshoe Crab spawning habitat presents a threat to a critical migration stopover site for Shorebirds Such Shorebird species depend on the Horseshoe Crab eggs they find along the Delaware Bay to fuel the remainder of their migration to Arctic breeding grounds A bird that does not consume enough Horseshoe Crabs eggs will simply not be able to breed or even make it to the Arctic What the Wetlands Institute Is Doing to Help Much has happened and very quickly with this project as the Restoration Team raced against the clock to restore horseshoe crab spawning habitat by April 30 th Sand from the local land mine company Albrecht and Heun in addition to sand from Cumberland County has been coming to our project area in a constant stream of truckloads since March 18 th Such persistence has helped to fully restore Kimbles Beach Cooks Beach Reeds Beach and Pierces Point More than 48 tons rubble has been removed from South Reeds Beach alone and more than 23 000 cubic yards of sand has been spread upon these beaches Pierce s Point also had old bulkheads and structures removed from the beach Thanks to Middle Township and The Cape May County Mosquito Commission for their great work on these efforts too The beaches are ready and the horseshoe crabs have started to return with the first spawning documented in the Reeds Beach Area on Saturday night April 27 th with the full moon high tide We are anxiously awaiting the return of the shorebirds Taking advantage of the capacity to learn about a first ever Horseshoe Crab beach restoration effort Wetlands Institute staff have begun conducting research on this project Before sand was placed along the project area baseline beach profiles were measured at several points along each of the beach sites within the project area Reeds Beach Cooks Beach Kimbles Beach and Pierces Point These beach profiles allow for an understanding on how the beach face originally sloped before restoration activities took place We conducted a second round of profiling following the restoration work We will continue to measure the

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/conservation/horseshoe-crab-conservation/post-sandy-emergency-restoration/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary Restoration - The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute
    WI New Jersey Adubon s World Series of Birding Online Pledge Form Donate a Fixed Amount Native Gardening and Landscaping Research Current and Past Programs Coastal Conservation Research Program 2015 Intern Symposium Partners Sponsors Stone Harbor Point Restoration Project Academic Affiliations of Student Researchers Asian Scholarship Program 2000 2010 Diamondback Terrapins Visit Us Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary Restoration Click here to view a copy of the Vegetation Management Plan Read more about this effort in an article written by Dr Lenore Tedesco Invasive Species Clean up On Saturday November 2 nd 2013 The Wetlands Institute working in cooperation with the Borough of Stone Harbor and the Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary Committee sponsored the first of many planned volunteer efforts designed to remove invasive vines from sections of the Bird Sanctuary Dr Lenore Tedesco a noted expert in natural areas restoration is leading the Institutes collaboration efforts with the Sanctuary committee It is expected that removal of invasive growth will improve habitat and provide open flyways for colonial wading birds such as egrets and herons to roost and nest in the Sanctuary Improved habitat will also increase site usage by resident and migratory songbirds Volunteers included community members Grant Russ Director of Public Works in Stone Harbor and his son Chris as well as staff from prominent local landscape organizations As the pictures illustrate the volunteers made a significant impact removing a dumpster full of exotic invasive English Ivy and Japanese Honeysuckle from a maritime forest area of the Sanctuary that includes a holly tree estimated to be around 400 years old The removal of these invasive vines which effectively strangle the trees will extend the life of the oldest Sanctuary resident Following an invasive vegetation management and control plan developed by Dr Tedesco the Stone Harbor Bird Sanctuary Committee The

    Original URL path: http://wetlandsinstitute.org/help-us-grow/volunteer-2/habitat-restoration/ (2016-04-29)
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