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  • Friends of White Clay Creek State Park: Contact Us
    Results of 2012 Member Survey Park Info Links Park Info Links Birder s Guide Park Area History Membership Contact Us Contact Information Mailing Address Friends of White Clay Creek State Park P O Box 9734 Newark DE 19714 9734 For membership information contact Susie Lloyd Membership Chair Email fwccsp gmail com For volunteer opportunities contact Debra Chiczewski Price Volunteer Chair Email debchic gmail com For general information contact Debra Chiczewski

    Original URL path: http://whiteclayfriends.org/contact.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Friends of White Clay Creek State Park: Trail List
    Shared Use Open Post Mark d West Cutoff Trail Shared Use Open Connector Trail 9 Foot Road Parking Lot to Bryan s Field Trail Shared Use Open Whitely Farms Trail 9 Foot Road Parking Lot Loop Shared Use Assigned Whitely Farms Trail Loop east of Tri Valley Trail Shared Use Assigned Connector Trail Whitely Farms Trail to Big Pond Area Shared Use Open Carpenter Recreation Area Trails Trail Use Status Twin Valley Trail Arc Monument Loop Hikers Only Assigned Twin Valley Trail north Wedgewood Road Millstone Trail South section Shared Use Assigned Twin Valley Trail East of Wells Lane Hikers Only Assigned Millstone Trail North section Hikers Only Open Life Course Trail Hikers Only Open Nature Center Park Office Trails Trail Use Status Preserve Loop North Chambers Rock Road to PA Line Hikers Only Assigned Preserve Loop South Chambers Rock Road to Nature Center Hikers Only Assigned Pomeroy Trail Rail Trail Hopkins Road to Wedgewood Road Shared Use Open David English Trail Shared Use Assigned Twin Ponds Cutoff Trail Shared Use Assigned Boundary Line Trail Cart Road Shared Use Assigned Judge Morris Trails Trail Use Status Chestnut Hill Trail Western Loop Shared Use Assigned Chestnut Hill Trail Eastern Loop Shared

    Original URL path: http://whiteclayfriends.org/trail_list.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Friends of White Clay Creek State Park: Honoring Quaker Roots
    known as Hopyard Hillvale Pennview Hillside and Hilltop located along the White Clay Creek and what is now Chambers Rock Road It was a Benjamin Chambers who purchased 250 acres from David Evans in 1775 including the land on which the nature center stands According to J Thomas Scharf s History of Delaware 1888 previous to 1798 Benjamin Chambers erected a saw mill on White Clay Creek in the northwest part of the hundred An 1810 census lists Benjamin Chambers his wife three sons and four daughters as residents of White Clay Creek Tax assessment records from 1816 value his holdings at 5 523 and describe a good framed dwelling and unframed barn It is clear that this is not the present nature center building which must have been erected after this date Upon Benjamin s death in 1819 his land was divided between two sons Samuel and Joseph Joseph received 100 acres and according to Scharf dismantled his father s mill It was on this tract of land that the nature center was built some time after 1819 Joseph and his family are listed as residents of White Clay Creek Hundred in the 1820 1830 and 1840 census records Although much of the extended Chambers family retained their Quaker Meeting memberships Joseph Chambers was not a Quaker Members of the Chambers Passmore Thompson and Sharpless families purchased land in Strickersville in 1827 where they built a meeting house which became London Britain Monthly Meeting These family names are visible today on many of the tombstones standing in the meeting house cemetery on New London Road Joseph s father Benjamin Chambers was a Quaker according to park volunteer Jean Abplanalp in her research of unpublished abstracts for Kennett and New Garden Monthly Meetings He was disowned from New Garden Monthly Meeting in 1772 for marrying Hannah Black out of unity Hannah Black was also a member of New Garden Monthly Meeting but they were married by a priest Their son Joseph was never a member since to be birthright both parents of the child had to be members The procedure for an orderly Quaker marriage was for a couple to appear before the monthly meeting the basic administrative unit in the Society of Friends and express their intention to marry Members were required to belong to the monthly meeting closest to their residence Both bride and groom had to be members and it was the convention for the couple to be married under the care of the bride s home meeting if they belonged to different meetings A committee checked into the couple s clearness to marry to see that there were no previous commitments or obstacles and that they had the permission of their parents The couple then came before the monthly meeting a second time the following month and stated their intentions a second time If everything was in order they were given permission to marry If the couple didn t want to go through this process and

    Original URL path: http://whiteclayfriends.org/honoring_quaker_roots.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Friends of White Clay Creek State Park: The Pomeroy and the Newark Railroad
    ballast for the bed traversing swampy areas cutting through rock outcrops and getting wet in the creek during winter months must have tested the endurance of the work gangs Construction of the rail line by two different railroads began between 1868 and 1871 The Doe Run and White Clay Creek Railroad Company built the segment from a point along the Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad near Pomeroy to the Delaware state line The Delaware and Pennsylvania Rail Road Company built the segment from the state line to Delaware City The ownership of this line and its official name have changed so often through its history as to make the most organized and agile mind weary so I will refer to it in this essay as the Pomeroy Railroad Builders of the Delaware City portion claimed that this line would make Delaware City the Norfolk of the Delaware River a thriving coal port Shipped via Pomeroy at a savings of 60 miles anthracite would land 30 miles nearer the sea than if it went to Philadelphia Delaware City was preferable to Philadelphia also because it was ice free in winter months The line could also supply coal locally and move the substantial lime marble kaolin and agricultural production that was growing in the region Unfortunately for Delaware City however the great success of the railroads up until 1872 came to an abrupt halt in 1873 the year the Pomeroy Railroad was completed and the year a great depression hit the country lasting until 1880 The first train was scheduled to run on May 1 1873 It was not without event Bedecked in flags wreaths and flowers in honor of the occasion the mixed freight and passenger train struck a cow belonging to John Dorsey living at Doe Run and completely decapitated her without injury to the train The train made two trips per day to Pomeroy Leaving Delaware City about 7 a m it would arrive in Pomeroy at approximately 9 30 It would depart again traveling to Newark and back again to Pomeroy In the evening it would depart Pomeroy and run the length of the line to Delaware City The company underwent foreclosure in 1879 but was reorganized In 1880 a bill was introduced in the Delaware legislature to legalize the sale of the line south of Newark An advantage would be gained in the transport of peaches because it shortened the distance west to Baltimore In fact it was the north south route of the railroad that changed Delaware into the Peach State making the peach blossom the state flower In anticipation of the railroad construction farmers planted peaches in more rural areas Prior to this peaches were only grown in Wilmington and in Delaware City because of access to steamboat transport Peach production became a part of the Delaware economy and most peaches were shipped by rail Unfortunately a disease called the yellows struck the trees and ended the peach endeavor in the 1890s Farmers then switched to

    Original URL path: http://whiteclayfriends.org/pomeroy_and_newark_railroad.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Friends of White Clay Creek State Park: Tracking the “Pumpsie Doodle” Along White Clay Creek
    church a school and five dwellings Richard Edward s 1880 Industry of Delaware describes McClellandsville as having a Post Office and a station on the Pennsylvania and Delaware Railroad two miles north of Newark It is a thriving growing place with a church an hotel a large carriage shop several stores and a population of more than 150 with the prospects of becoming quite a place In 1880 Mansell Tweed converted the bark mill into a flint mill that produced six tons per day and employed eight men Flint ground quartz was used in the porcelain industry It is possible that Mansell Tweed s ground flint product was transported on the Pomeroy railroad A Pennsylvania Railroad timetable of 1887 lists the Tweed stop as M Tweed and as an individual siding as was F F Armstrong W Dean and S B Wright at Newark Center This suggests that freight was delivered or loaded at Tweed just as it was at these other locations A bridge over the creek at Wedgewood road connected McClellandsville and the mill to the rails on the east side of the creek Another road was built on the east side of the creek connecting the station to Milford Crossroads a major intersection on the road from Newark to Limestone Road This provided access to rail transport for passengers and industrial enterprises along major roads from both the east and west THOMPSON STATION Thompson Station was located west of the creek just south of Chambers Rock Road It is listed by Richard Edwards 1880 as being 4 miles north from Newark on the Pennsylvania and Delaware Railroad and is a postal station with a population of 15 or 20 families with the usual ambition of being a city The 1899 Biographical and General History of Delaware describes it as a village of some 30 to 40 inhabitants a station on the Pomeroy and Newark Railroad The station was named after the Thompson family who owned the farmland on which the station was built Right of way access across the Thompson farm was granted by Joel Thompson Jr and his wife S Cornelia Thompson to the Pennsylvania and Delaware Railway Company for 400 on July 23 1873 Terms of the indenture included an agreement that the railroad company would construct and maintain a station house and side track and erect and maintain a lawful fence on the line Mr Thompson agreed to provide a public road about 270 feet long and 30 feet wide extending from the County Road to the Depot grounds This road was to be kept open and maintained as a county road Today the only trace of Thompson Station that can be detected is this road Mr Eugene Robinson personal communication 2002 remembers the barn like building as one and one half stories high and rectangular in shape approximately 55 feet long and 35 feet wide Thompson Station was strictly a freight station It is possible that this changed at some point because Mr

    Original URL path: http://whiteclayfriends.org/tracking_pumpsie_doodle.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Friends of White Clay Creek State Park: The Horn
    County and New Castle County defined in a 1701 survey was an arc of 12 miles radius with the center in the city of New Castle At that time New Castle Kent and Sussex were the three southern counties of Pennsylvania and most of the boundary markers were temporary in nature Many of the original survey markers had disappeared by the late 1800s and significant questions arose as to the actual location of the boundary between Delaware and Pennsylvania In 1889 Delaware and Pennsylvania authorized commissioners to define and mark the boundary The boundary was resurveyed in 1892 3 and a decision was made to use separate arcs different radii and center points to define the western and eastern portions of the arc boundary This was done because of the lack of any markers on the western section and errors in the original 1701 survey The western arc that was chosen intersected with an extension of the Mason Dixon line at the present arc corner approximately 2000 feet east of the previously accepted location and intersected with the eastern arc just west of Centerville The commissioners awarded the resulting horn shaped section of land to Pennsylvania and the wedge to

    Original URL path: http://whiteclayfriends.org/the_horn.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Friends of White Clay Creek State Park: Carrie A. Nation and Harvest Home
    and The Fairview Lodge of the Good Templars The Templars were a worldwide temperance group supporting total abstinence and prohibition The popularity of Ebenezer s Harvest Home was noted in the newspapers One article in 1905 said throngs of vehicles of all kinds and persons from miles around attended despite bad weather Candidates for office visited and by nightfall the grove was adorned with their cards Hacks would meet people at the various Newark train stations and transport them to the festival A noontime dinner and evening supper were prepared and served by the ladies of the church Fried chicken in abundance and other delicacies of the season were offered Root beer orange and grape drink were served Music often of a patriotic nature was offered by local and regional bands The speakers usually represented the temperance movement After Arthur Whiteman sold his farm to Samuel Hallock DuPont in 1929 the Harvest Home was moved to Little s Grove which is south of the Ebenezer Methodist Church on Polly Drummond Road It continued to be held there until the late 1940s Carrie A Nation s Visit Carrie A Nation 1846 1911 visited the Harvest Home in Whiteman s Grove on August 4 1904 Her national reputation was created when she started to enter saloons and liquor stores with bricks or hatchets and proceeded to smash bar features and stock Between 1900 and 1910 she was arrested about 30 times To pay her fines and support herself she traveled the country giving lectures and selling souvenir hatchets and books Her anger against liquor stemmed from her first failed marriage to an alcoholic At nearly 6 feet tall and 175 pounds Carrie Nation was a formidable presence She traveled alone all around the country She described herself as a bulldog running along

    Original URL path: http://whiteclayfriends.org/harvest_home.php (2016-04-26)
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  • Friends of White Clay Creek State Park: Mason and Dixon in Mill Creek
    binding and included provisions of many of the earlier decrees The most important provision was that the northern boundary of Maryland would be 15 miles south of the southernmost part of Philadelphia A commission made up of people from the colonies was selected to draw up the boundaries The commission knew it needed to do a proper survey and at first local surveyors were hired Unfortunately they lacked the technical skills needed and their instruments were not as precise as was required It also became evident that the surveyors must be viewed as independent or the attacks on them would continue The solution was to hire Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in 1763 They had achieved renown by observing the Transit of Venus in 1761 in Southern Africa In this rare event Venus passes between the sun and the earth enabling scientists to determine the distance from the earth to the sun The surveyors faced many potential problems One problem was armed conflict between Native Americans and colonists in the western part of Pennsylvania and Maryland The alliance of tribes under Chief Pontiac was attacking settlers and forts in the area Another problem was where to start the survey line 15 miles south of Philadelphia If they traveled due south from the southernmost point they would have to go across the Delaware River and start in New Jersey They decided to head due west instead and stopped at John Harlan s farm 31 miles west of Philadelphia That spot is marked today by what is called the Stargazers Stone in a front yard on Stargazers Road in Embreeville The stone was named for the many astronomical observations made by the surveyors to determine their exact location Once they were sure they were exactly west of the southernmost point of Philadelphia they began to work their way south in January and February 1764 First ax men were hired to cut trees in an eight yard wide path to accommodate the survey Then Mason and Dixon started their measurements After two and a half weeks they came to a field owned by Alexander Bryan 15 miles south of the turning point on Harlan s farm An observation platform was built on the spot from which celestial readings were made to confirm that they had measured accurately When they were certain they had the right spot they placed a stout oak post in the ground and painted it white with the word west on its western face This was to be called the Post Mark d West It was from this point 15 miles south and 31 miles west of Philadelphia that they would begin their survey This became a constant point of reference that they would use as they moved westward to establish the boundary between the battling colonies of Pennsylvania and Maryland This is how Mason described the location of this significant point in his journal The point 15 miles South of the Southernmost Point of the City of Philadelphia is

    Original URL path: http://whiteclayfriends.org/mason_and_dixon.php (2016-04-26)
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