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  • File:The Marriage of Heaven and Hell - copy D.djvu - Wikisource, the free online library
    domain in the United States This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law including all related and neighboring rights Other versions PDF File history Click on a date time to view the file as it appeared at that time Date Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 19 45 25 August 2008 1 200 1 778 27 pages 1 06 MB John Vandenberg Information Description The Marriage of Heaven and Hell Source http www loc gov rr rarebook rosenwald blake html Date 1794 Author William Blake Permission PD old 100 other versions Image The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D pdf File usage The following 30 pages link to this file User William Maury Morris II Wikisource Proofread of the Month Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 1 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 10 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 11 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 12 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 13 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 14 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 15 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 16 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 17 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 18 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 19 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 2 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 20 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 21 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy D djvu 22 Page The Marriage of Heaven and Hell copy

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  • The Marriage of Heaven and Hell - Wikisource, the free online library
    that all Gods would at last be proved to originate in ours to be the tributaries of the Poetic Genius it was this that our great poet King David desired so fervently invokes so patheticly saying by this he conquers enemies governs kingdoms and so we loved our God that we cursed in his name all the deities of surrounding nations and asserted that they had rebelled from these opinions the vulgar came to think that all nations would at last be subject to the jews This said he like all firm persuasions is come to pass for all nations believe the jews code and worship the jews god and what greater subjection can be I heard this with some wonder must confess my own conviction After dinner I ask d Isaiah to favour the world with his lost works he said none of equal value was lost Ezekiel said the same of his I also asked Isaiah what made him go naked and barefoot three years he answerd the same that made our friend Diogenes the Grecian I then asked Ezekiel why he eat dung lay so long on his right left side he answerd the desire of raising other men into a perception of the infinite this is the North American tribes practise is he honest who resists his genius or conscience only for the sake of present ease or gratification The ancient tradition that the world will be consumed in fire at the end of six thousand years is true as I have heard from Hell For the cherub with his flaming sword is hereby commanded to leave his guard at tree of life and when he does the whole creation will be consumed and appear infinite and holy whereas now it appears finite corrupt This will come to pass by an improvement of sensual enjoyment But first the notion that man has a body distinct from his soul is to be expunged this I shall do by printing in the infernal method by corrosives which in Hell are salutary and medicinal melting apparent surfaces away and displaying the infinite which was hid If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is infinite For man has closed himself up til he sees all things thro narrow chinks of his cavern A Memorable Fancy I was in a Printing house in Hell saw the method in which knowledge is transmitted from generation to generation In the first chamber was a Dragon Man clearing away the rubbish from a caves mouth within a number of dragons were hollowing the cave In the second chamber was a Viper folding round the rock the cave and others adorning it with gold silver and precious stones In the third chamber was an Eagle with wings and feathers of air he caused the inside of the cave to be infinite around were numbers of Eagle like men who built palaces in the immense cliffs In the fourth chamber were Lions of flaming fire raging around melting the metals into living fluids In the fifth chamber were Unnam d forms which cast the metals into the expanse There they were reciev d by Men who occupied the sixth chamber and took the forms of books were arranged in libraries The Giants who formed this world into its sensual existence and now seem to live in it in chains are in truth the causes of its life the sources of all activity but the chains are the cunning of weak and tame minds which have power to resist energy according to the proverb the weak in courage is strong in cunning Thus one portion of being is the Prolific the other the Devouring to the devourer it seems as if the producer was in his chains but it is not so he only takes portions of existence and fancies that the whole But the Prolific would cease to be the Prolific unless the Devourer as a sea recieved the excess of his delights Some will say Is not God alone the Prolific I answer God only Acts Is in existing beings or Men These two classes of men are always upon earth they should be enemies whoever tries to reconcile them seeks to destroy existence Religion is an endeavour to reconcile the two Note Jesus Christ did not wish to unite but to seperate the two as in the Parable of sheep and goats he says I came not to send Peace but a Sword Messiah or Satan or Tempter was formerly thought to be one of the Antediluvians who are our Energies A Memorable Fancy An Angel came to me and said O pitiable foolish young man O horrible O dreadful state consider the hot burning dungeon thou art preparing for thyself to all eternity to which thou art going in such a career I said perhaps you will be willing to shew me my eternal lot we will contemplate together upon it and see whether your lot or mine is most desirable So he took me thro a stable thro a church down into the church vault at the end of which was a mill thro the mill we went and came to a cave down the winding cavern we groped our tedious way till a void boundless as a nether sky appeared us we held by the roots of trees and hung over this immensity but I said if you please we will commit ourselves to this void and see whether this providence is here also if you will not I will but he answerd do not presume O young man but as we here remain behold thy lot which will soon appear when the darkness passes away So I remained with him sitting in the twisted root of an oak he was suspended in a fungus which hung with the head downward into the deep By degrees we beheld the infinite Abyss fiery as

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  • William Blake - Wikisource, the free online library
    carried it like a long fork Some Men created for destruction come Blake s apology for his Catalogue Cosway Frazer Baldwin of Egypts Lake The Errors of a Wise Man make your Rule Laocoon c 1826 7 As illustrator only Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes 1798 The Bard A Pindaric Ode 1798 A Father s Memoirs of his Child 1805 Works about Blake edit Biographies edit Notes on Blake the illustrator from Introduction A Father s Memoirs of his Child by B H Malkin illustrations by Blake 1805 pp xviii xli Extracts from the Diary Letters and Reminiscences of Henry Crabb Robinson transcribed from the Original MSS in Dr Williams s Library 1810 1852 in William Blake edited by Symons 1907 Part II Records from contemporary sources Obituary Notices in the Literary Gazette and Gentleman s Magazine reprinted in William Blake 1907 edited by Symons 1827 William Blake The Lives of the Most Eminent British Painters Sculptors and Architects Vol 2 Cunningham 1830 140 79 Reprint in William Blake by Arthur Symons 1907 Life of William Blake by Alexander Gilchrist D G Rossetti W M Rossetti Anne Gilchrist 1863 1880 Biography in Nollekens and His Times by J T Smith 1829 Essay on Blake James Smetham London Quarterly Review January 1869 Reprint Essay on Blake by James Smetham in Gilchrist Life of William Blake 1880 Volume 2 Life of Blake Frederick Tatham MS reprinted in The Letters of William Blake together with His Life by F Tatham A G B Russell ed 1906 William Blake Chesterton 1910 Articles from reference works edit Redgrave Samuel 1878 Blake William in A Dictionary of Artists of the English School 44 45 Blake William in The Nuttall Encyclopædia by James Wood London Frederick Warne and Co Ltd 1907 Blake William in A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature by John William Cousin London J M Dent Sons 1910 Blake William 1757 1827 in Dictionary of National Biography London Smith Elder Co 1885 1900 in 63 vols Gilchrist Anne Blake William The New International Encyclopædia New York Dodd Mead and Co 1905 Blake William in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 William Blake Poet and Painter by Edmund Clarence Stedman from Genius and other essays 1911 piece originally published in 15 January 1881 issue of The Critic Other edit Postscript of Letter to The Rev H F Cary 6 February 1818 by Coleridge Fragment of a Letter to Charles Augustus Tulk 12 February 1818 by Coleridge Extract from Diary illustrative of the Times of George the Fourth by Lady Charlotte Bury 1820 Blake s Horoscope reprint originally in Urania or the Astrologers Choice 1825 extract from Varley s Zodiacal Physiognomy 1828 The Poems of William Blake essay by James Thomson 1865 William Blake a critical essay by Swinburne 1868 Poetical sketches by William Blake now first reprinted from the original edition of 1783 Edited by R H Shepherd 1868 The works of William Blake poetic symbolic

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  • File:Old-Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs.djvu - Wikisource, the free online library
    Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 14 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 142 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 146 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 15 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 153 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 154 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 155 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 156 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 16 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 17 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 18 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 19 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 2 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 20 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 21 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 22 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 23 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 24 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 25 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 26 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 27 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 28 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 29 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 3 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 30 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 31 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 32 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 33 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 34 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 35 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 36 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 37 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 38 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 39 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 4 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 40 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 41 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu 42 Page Old Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs djvu

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    it stand fifteen or twenty minutes Dissolve the sugar in two quarts of warm water pour both into a barrel half filled with cold water then add the essence and the yeast let it stand one half hour then fill up with cold water Let it ferment six to twelve hours and bottle GINGER WINE Take four gallons of water ten pounds of loaf sugar one and one quarter pounds of bruised ginger one ounce of hops the shaved rinds of five lemons or Seville oranges Let these boil together for two hours carefully skimming Pour it without straining on to two pounds of raisins When cool put in the juice of the lemons or oranges rinse the pulp in a pint or two of the wine and strain it to the rest Ferment it with yeast mix one half cup of solid yeast with a pint or two of the wine and with that work the rest Next day tun it raisins hops ginger and all together and fill it up for a fortnight either with wine or with good new beer then dissolve one ounce of isinglass in a little of the wine and return it to the rest to fine it A few days afterward bung it close This wine will be in full perfection in six months It may be bottled but is apt to fly and if made exactly by the above directions and drawn from the cask it will sparkle like champagne TO MAKE GOOSEBERRY WINE Boil four gallons of water and one half pound of sugar an hour skim it well and let it stand till it is cold Then to every quart of that water allow one and one half pounds of gooseberries first beaten or bruised very well let it stand twenty four hours Then strain it out and to every gallon of this liquor put three pounds of sugar let it stand in the vat twelve hours Then take the thick scum off and put the clear into a vessel fit for it and let it stand a month then draw it off and rinse the vessel with some of the liquor Put it in again and let it stand four months and bottle it GOOSEBERRY WINE Take to every four pounds of gooseberries one and one quarter pounds of sugar and one quart of fair water Bruise the berries and steep them twenty four hours in the water stirring them often then press the liquor from them and put your sugar to the liquor Then put in a vessel fit for it and when it is done working stop it up and let it stand a month then rack it off into another vessel and let it stand five or six weeks longer Then bottle it out putting a small lump of sugar into every bottle cork your bottles well and three months end it will be fit to drink In the same manner is currant and raspberry wine made but cherry wine differs for the cherries are not to be bruised but stoned and put the sugar and water together and give it a boil and a skim and then put in your fruit letting it stew with a gentle fire a quarter of an hour and then let it run through a sieve without pressing and when it is cold put it in a vessel and order it as your gooseberry or currant wine The only cherries for wine are the great bearers Murray cherries Morelloes Black Flanders or the John Treduskin cherries GOOSEBERRY WINE NO 2 Pick and bruise the gooseberries and to every pound of berries put one quart of cold spring water and let it stand three days stirring it twice or thrice a day Add to every gallon of juice three pounds of loaf sugar Fill the barrel and when it is done working add to every ten quarts of liquor one pint of brandy and a little isinglass The gooseberries must be picked when they are just changing color The liquor ought to stand in the barrel six months Taste it occasionally and bottle when the sweetness has gone off GOOSEBERRY AND CURRANT WINE The following method of making superior gooseberry and currant wines is recommended in a French work For currant wine four pounds of honey dissolved in seven gallons of boiling water to which when clarified is added the juice of four pounds of red or white currants It is then fermented for twenty four hours and one pound of sugar to every one gallon of water is added The preparation is afterward clarified with whites of eggs and cream of tartar For gooseberry wine the fruit is gathered dry when about half ripe and then pounded in a mortar The juice when properly strained is mixed with sugar in the proportion of three pounds to every two gallons of juice It is then left in a quiet state for fifteen days at the expiration of which it is carefully poured off and left to ferment for three months when the quantity is under fifteen gallons and five months when double that quantity It is then bottled and soon becomes fit for drinking PEARL GOOSEBERRY WINE Take as many as you please of the best gooseberries bruise them and let them stand all night The next morning press or squeeze them out and let the liquor stand to settle seven or eight hours then pour off the clear from the settling and measure it as you put it into your vessel adding to every three pints of liquor one pound of double refined sugar Break your sugar into fine lumps and put it in the vessel with a bit of isinglass stop it up and at three months end bottle it out putting into every bottle a lump of double refined sugar This is the fine gooseberry wine RED GOOSEBERRY WINE Take five gallons cold soft water five and one half gallons red gooseberries and ferment Now mix eight pounds raw sugar one pound beet root sliced one half ounce red tartar in fine powder Afterward put in one half pound sassafras chips one half gallon brandy or less This will make nine gallons RED AND WHITE GOOSEBERRY WINE Take one and one half gallons cold soft water three quarts red gooseberries two quarts white gooseberries Ferment Now mix two and one half pounds raw sugar three quarters pound honey one half ounce tartar in fine powder Afterwards put in one ounce bitter almonds a small handful sweet briar two quarts brandy or less WHITE GOOSEBERRY OR CHAMPAGNE WINE Take four and one half gallons cold soft water and fifteen quarts of white gooseberries Ferment Now mix six pounds refined sugar four pounds honey one ounce white tartar in fine powder Put in one ounce dry orange and lemon peel or two ounces fresh and add one half gallon white brandy This will make nine gallons UNFERMENTED GRAPE JUICE Wash and take from the stems ten pounds ripe Concord grapes Add two quarts water and bring them to a boil Use a potato masher When the seeds separate strain through double cheese cloth Add two pounds of granulated sugar and strain again Bring again to a boil and bottle directly boiling hot cork and seal or put into patent bottles Serve with cracked ice in the glass or diluted with about one third ice water GRAPE WINE Two quarts of grape juice two quarts of water four pounds of sugar Extract the juice of the grape in any simple way if only a few quarts are desired we do it with a strainer and a pair of squeezers if a large quantity is desired put the grapes into a cheese press made particularly clean putting on sufficient weight to extract the juice of a full hoop of grapes being careful that none but perfect grapes are used perfectly ripe and free from blemish After the first pressing put a little water with the pulp and press a second time using the juice of the second pressing with the water to be mixed with the clear grape juice If only a few quarts are made place the wine as soon as mixed into bottles filling them even full and allow to stand in a warm place until it ferments which will take about thirty six hours usually then remove all the scum cool and put into a dark cool place If a few gallons are desired place in a keg but the keg must be even full and after fermentation has taken place and the scum removed draw off and bottle and cork tight GRAPE WINE NO 2 The larger the proportion of juice and the less of water the nearer it will approach to the strength and richness of foreign wine There ought not to be less than one third juice pure Squeeze the grapes in a hair sieve bruising them with the hand rather than any heavier press as it is better not to crush the stones Soak the pulp in water until a sufficient quantity is obtained to fill up the cask As loaf sugar is to be used for this wine and it is not easily dissolved in cold liquid the best plan is to pour over the sugar three pounds in every gallon required as much boiling water as will dissolve it and stir till it is dissolved When cold put it in the cask with the juice fill up from water in which the pulp has been steeped To each gallon of wine put one half ounce of bitter almonds not blanched but cut small The fermentation will not be very great When it subsides proceed with brandy and papering GRAPE WINE NO 3 Crush the grapes and let them stand one week Drain off the juice strain add one quart of water and three pounds of sugar to each gallon Put in a barrel or cask with a thin piece of muslin tacked over the bung hole and let stand until fermentation stops Put in a cask and seal securely and let stand six months Then bottle and seal and keep in cool place HOP BEER Turn five quarts of water on six ounces of hops boil three hours Strain off the liquor turn on four quarts more of water and twelve spoonfuls of ginger and boil the hops three hours longer Strain and mix it with the other liquor and stir in two quarts of molasses Brown very dry one half pound of bread and put in rusked bread is best Pound it fine and brown it in a pot like coffee After cooling to be about luke warm add one pint of new yeast that is free from salt Keep the beer covered in a temperate situation till fermentation has ceased which is known by the settling of the froth then turn it into a keg or bottles and keep it in a cool place JUNIPER BERRY WINE Take four and one half gallons of cold soft water seven pounds Malaga or Smyrna raisins two and one quarter quarts juniper berries one half ounce red tartar one half handful wormwood one half handful sweet marjoram one pint whiskey or more Ferment for ten or twelve days KOUMISS A TARTAR WINE Take a quantity of fresh mare s milk add to it one sixth part water pour the mixture into a wooden bowl Use as a ferment one eighth part of skimmed milk but at any future preparation a small portion of old koumiss will answer better Cover the vessel with a thick cloth and set in a moderately warm place for twenty four hours at the end of which time the milk will have become sour and a thick substance gathered at the top Now with a churn staff beat it till the thick substance above mentioned be blended intimately with the adjacent fluid Leave it to rest twenty four hours more after which pour it into a higher and narrower vessel resembling a churn where the agitation must be repeated as before In this state it is called koumiss The taste should be a pleasant mixture of sweet and sour It should always be well shaken before used KOUMISS Heat four cups milk cool when lukewarm add one fourth yeast cake dissolved in one fourth cup lukewarm water and two tablespoons sugar Pour into bottles with patent stoppers fill two thirds full cork tightly Shake let stand in kitchen six hours then on ice for twenty four hours serve ice cold TO MAKE LEMON WINE Take six large lemons pare off the rind and squeeze out the juice steep the rind in the juice and put to it one quart of brandy Let it stand in an earthen pot close stopped three days then squeeze six more and mix with two quarts of water and as much sugar as will sweeten the whole Boil the water lemons and sugar together letting it stand till it is cool then add one quart of white wine and the other lemon and brandy and mix them together and run it through a flannel bag into some vessel Let it stand three months and bottle it off cork your bottles very well and keep it cool It will be fit to drink in a month or six weeks LEMON WINE NO 2 Four pounds sugar one pound raisins bruised two gallons water Boil then add one gallon cider Ferment and add one quart of spirits three quarters ounce white tartar a few drops essence of lemon Observe to shake the essence with a little of the spirit until it becomes milky before adding it to the wine MADEIRA WINE To five gallons prepared cider add one half pound loaf sugar Let it stand ten days draw it off carefully fine it down and again rack it into another cask MALT WINE OR ENGLISH SHERRY Take twelve pounds of good moist sugar two gallons of water Boil them together two hours skimming carefully When the scum is all removed and the liquor looks clear add one half ounce of hops which should boil one quarter hour and twenty minutes When the liquor is quite cold add to it five quarts of strong beer in the height of working cover up and let it work forty eight hours then skim and tun If none remains for filling up use new beer for that purpose This method may be adopted with all boiled wines and will be found to improve their strength and promote their keeping In a fortnight or three weeks when the head begins to sink add two and one half pounds raisins free from stalks one ounce of sugar candy one ounce of bitter almonds one half cup of the best brandy brown paper as in former articles It may be bottled in one year but if left three years in the wood and then bottled it will be found equal in strength and flavor to foreign wine MEAD The following is a good recipe for mead On five pounds of honey pour five quarts of boiling water boil and remove the scum as it rises add one quarter ounce of the best hops and boil for ten minutes Then pour the liquor into a tub to cool when all but cold add a little yeast spread upon a slice of toasted bread Let it stand in a warm room When fermentation is finished bung it down leaving a peg hole which can afterwards be closed and in less than a year it will be fit to bottle SMALL WHITE MEAD Take three gallons of spring water make it hot and dissolve in it three quarts of honey and one pound of loaf sugar Let it boil about one half hour and skim it as long as any scum rises Then pour it out into a tub and squeeze in the juice of four lemons put in the rinds but of two Twenty cloves two races of ginger one top of sweet briar and one top of rosemary Let it stand in a tub till it is but blood warm then make a brown toast and spread it with two or three spoonfuls of ale yeast Put it into a vessel fit for it let it stand four or five days then bottle it out TO MAKE STRONG MEAD Take of spring water what quantity you please make it more than blood warm and dissolve honey in it until it is strong enough to bear an egg the breadth of a shilling then boil it gently near an hour taking off the scum as it rises Then put to nine or ten gallons seven or eight large blades of mace three nutmegs quartered twenty cloves three or four sticks of cinnamon two or three roots of ginger and one quarter ounce of Jamaica pepper put these spices into the kettle to the honey and water a whole lemon with a sprig of sweet briar and a sprig of rosemary Tie the briar and rosemary together and when they have boiled a little while take them out and throw them away but let your liquor stand on the spice in a clear earthen pot till the next day Then strain it into a vessel that is fit for it put the spice in a bag hang it in the vessel stop it and at three months draw it into bottles Be sure that it is fine when it is bottled After it is bottled six weeks it is fit to drink MEAD METHEGLIN OR HONEY WINE Boil honey in water for an hour the proportion is from three to four pounds to each gallon Half an ounce of hops will both refine and preserve it but is not commonly added Skim carefully draining the skimmings through a hair sieve and return what runs through When of a proper coolness stir in yeast one teacupful of solid yeast will serve for nine gallons Tun it and let it work over filling it up till the fermentation subsides Paste over brown paper and watch it Rich mead will keep seven years and afford a brisk nourishing and pleasant drink Some people like to add the thinly shaved rind of a lemon to each gallon while boiling and put the fruit free from pith into the tub Others flavor it with spices and sweet herbs and mix it with new beer or sweet wort it is then called Welsh Braggart METHEGLIN Mix one and one half barrels of water with as much honey as will cause an egg to rise a little above the water then boil the mixture to one barrel skimming off the surface It will be a fine red or wine color and clear Then remove from the fire and when cold put it into a barrel leaving the bung hole open for several days until fermentation be over then stop it close and put into a cold cellar MOLASSES BEER One ounce hops one gallon water Boil for ten minutes strain add one pound molasses and when lukewarm add one spoonful yeast Ferment MORELLO WINE Take the juice of Morello or tame cherries and to each quart of the juice put three quarts of water and four pounds of coarse brown sugar Let them ferment and skim until worked clear Then draw off avoiding the sediment at the bottom Bung up or bottle which is best for all wines letting the bottles lie always on the side either for wines or beers TO MAKE MORELLO CHERRY WINE Let your cherries be very ripe pick off the stalks and bruise your fruit without breaking the stones Put them in an open vessel together let them stand twenty four hours then press them and to every gallon put two pounds of fine sugar then put it up in your cask and when it has done working stop it close Let it stand three or four months and bottle it it will be fit to drink in two months MOUNTAIN WINE Pick out the big stalks of your Malaga raisins then chop them very small five pounds to every gallon of cold spring water Let them steep a fortnight or more squeeze out the liquor and barrel it in a vessel fit for it First fume the vessel with brimstone don t stop it up till the hissing is over MULBERRY WINE On a dry day gather mulberries when they are just changing from redness to a shining black spread them thinly on a fine cloth or on a floor or table for twenty four hours and then press them Boil a gallon of water with each gallon of juice putting to every gallon of water one ounce of cinnamon bark and six ounces of sugar candy finely powdered Skim and strain the water when it is taken off and settled and put in the mulberry juice Now add to every gallon of the mixture one pint of white or Rhenish wine Let the whole stand in a cask to ferment for five or six days When settled drain it off into bottles and keep cool NOYAN Take six ounces of peach kernels and one ounce of bitter almonds Break them slightly Put them into a jug with three pints of white French brandy Let them infuse three weeks shaking the jug every day Then drain the liquor from kernels and strain it through a line bag Melt three quarters of a pound of best loaf sugar in one pint of rose water mix it with the liquor and filter it through a sieve the bottom of which is to be covered on the inside with blotting paper Let the vessel which is placed underneath to receive the liquor be entirely white that you may be better en abled to judge of its clearness If it is not clear the first time repeat the filtering Then bottle for use TO MAKE ORANGE WINE Put twelve pounds of fine sugar and the whites of eight eggs well beaten into six gallons of spring water let it boil an hour skimming it all the time Take it off and when it is pretty cool put in the juice and rind of fifty Seville oranges and six spoonfuls of good ale yeast and let it stand two days Then put it into your vessel with two quarts of Rhenish wine and the juice of twelve lemons You must let the juice of lemons and wine and two pounds of double refined sugar stand close covered ten or twelve hours before you put it in the vessel to your orange wine and skim off the seeds before you put it in The lemon peels must be put in with the oranges half the rinds must be put into the vessel It must stand ten or twelve days before it is fit to bottle ORANGE OR LEMON WINE BOTTLED Take five gallons of water fourteen pounds of loaf sugar three eggs the whites and shells one ounce of hops Boil together the sugar water and eggs when it has boiled an hour and become quite clear add the hops and the thinly shaved rinds of six or eight of the fruit more or less according as the bitter flavor is desired Let it boil in all two hours meanwhile remove all the peel and white pith of the fruit and squeeze the juice Pour a gallon or two of the hot liquor on the pulp stir it well about and when cool strain to the rest and add the juice Some people strain off the hops rind and eggs others prefer their remaining It is by no means important which mode is adopted Work it with yeast as the foregoing article and refine with isinglass dissolved in a quart of brandy This wine should be one year in wood and on in bottles when it will be found excellent ORANGE OR LEMON WINE WITHOUT BOILING Take one half chest of Seville oranges they are most juicy in March Shave the rinds of one or two dozen more or less according as the bitter flavor is desired or otherwise Pour over this one or two quarts of boiling water cover up and let it stand twelve hours then strain to the rest Put into the cask fifty six pounds of good Lisbon sugar Clear off all the peel and white pith from the oranges and squeeze through a hair sieve Put the juice into the cask to the sugar Wash the sieve and pulp with cold water and let the pulp soak in the water twenty four hours Strain and add to the last continually stirring it add more water to the pulp let it soak then strain and add Continue to do so till the cask is full often stirring it with a stick until all the sugar is dissolved Then leave it to ferment The fermentation will not be nearly so great as that of currant wine but the hissing noise will be heard for some weeks when this subsides add honey and brandy and paste over the brown paper This wine should remain in the cask a year before bottling TO MAKE ORANGE WINE WITH RAISINS Take seven and one half pounds of Malaga raisins pick them clean and chop them small You must have five large Seville oranges two of them you must pare as thin as for preserving Boil about two gallons of soft water till a third part be consumed let it cool a little Then put five quarts of it hot upon your raisins and orange peel stir it well together cover it up and when it is cold let it stand five days stirring it up once or twice a day Then pass it through a hair sieve and with a spoon press it as dry as you can and put it in a runlet fit for it and put to it the rinds of the other three oranges cut as thin as the first then make a syrup of the juice of five oranges with one quarter pound of white sugar It must be made the day before you tun it up stir it well together and stop it close Let it stand two months to clear then bottle it up it will keep three years and is better for keeping ORGEAT Boil two quarts of milk with one stick of cinnamon and let it stand to be quite cold taking out the cinnamon Blanch four ounces of the best sweet almonds pound them well in a marble mortar with a little rose water mix them well with the milk sweeten to your taste Let it boil again for a few minutes strain through a fine sieve till quite smooth and free from almonds Serve either cold or warm in handled glasses TO MAKE PALERMO WINE Take to every quart of water one pound of Malaga raisins rub and cut the raisins small and put them to the water and let them stand ten days stirring once or twice a day You may boil the water an hour before you put it to the raisins and let it stand to cool At ten days end strain out your liquor and put a little yeast to it and at three days end put it in the vessel with one sprig of dried wormwood Let it be close stopped and at three months end bottle it off TO MAKE PARSNIP WINE To six pounds of parsnips cut in slices add two gallons of water boil them till they become quite soft Squeeze the water out of them run it through a sieve and add to every gallon three pounds of loaf sugar Boil the whole three quarters of an hour and when it is nearly cold add a little yeast Let it stand ten days in a tub stirring it every day from the bottom then put it in a cask for twelve months as it works over fill it up every day PARSNIP WINE NO 2 Take one pound of parsnips cleaned and sliced When the water boils put in the parsnips and boil till they are perfectly tender drain through a sieve or colander without pressing Immediately return it to the copper with fourteen pounds of loaf sugar it will soon boil being already hot and what drips from the sieve may be added afterwards one and one half ounces of hops and boil it two hours Ferment with yeast let it stand four days to work in a warm place and tun and paste paper over It is most likely it will work up and burst the paper which must be renewed It may be cleared with isinglass but will not require any brandy PARSNIP WINE NO 3 Take seven and one half pounds of sliced parsnips and boil until quite soft in two and one half gallons of water squeeze the liquor well out of them run it through a sieve and add three pounds of coarse lump sugar to every gallon of liquor Boil the whole for three quarters of an hour When it is nearly cold add a little yeast on toast Let it remain in a tub for ten days stirring it from the bottom every day then put it into a cask for a year As it works over fill it up every day TO MAKE PEACH WINE Take three gallons cold soft water four and one quarter pounds refined sugar one pound honey one third ounce white tartar in fine powder ten or fourteen peaches Ferment then add six quarts of brandy The first division is to be put into a vat and the day after before the peaches are put in take the stones from them break these and the kernels then put them and the pulp into a vat and proceed with the general process PERRY OR PEAR CIDER Make this according to directions for apple cider Among the caricatures of the day just after Perry s victory on Lake Erie 1813 was one representing John Bull in the person of the King seated with his hand pressed upon his stomach indicating pain which the fresh juice of the pear called perry will produce This caricature is entitled Queen Charlotte and Johnny Bull got their dose of Perry PINEAPPLE RUM To three gallons rum made by the fruit method add two pineapples sliced and one half pound white sugar Let it stand two weeks before drawing off PLUM WINE Take five pounds of Malaga raisins pick rub and shred them and put them into a tub then take one gallon of water boil it an hour and let it stand till it is blood warm then put it to your raisins Let it stand nine or ten days stirring it once or twice a day strain out your liquor and mix it with one pint of damson juice Put it in a vessel and when it has done working stop it close at four or five months bottle it POP OR GINGER BEER The principal difference between ginger pop and ginger beer is that the former is bottled immediately the other is first put in a barrel for a few days It is also usual to boil the ingredients for ginger beer which is not done for pop Both are to be bottled in stone bottles and the corks tied or wired down If properly done the corks and strings will serve many times in succession the moment the string is untied the cork will fly out uninjured The bottles as soon as empty should be soaked a few hours in cold water shaken about and turned down and scalded immediately before using The corks also must be scalded On one pound of coarse loaf or fine moist sugar two ounces of cream of tartar one ounce of bruised ginger pour one gallon of boiling water stir it well and cover up to cool as the flavor of the ginger is apt to evaporate It is a good way to do thus far the last thing at night then it is just fit to set working the first thing in the morning Two large tablespoonfuls of yeast stir to it one teacupful of the liquor Let it stand a few minutes in a warmish place then pour it to the rest stir it well and cover up for eight hours Be particular as to time If done earlier the bottles are apt to fly if later the beer soon becomes vapid Skim strain bottle cork and tie down The cork should not touch the beer It will be fit for use next day Lemon rind and juice may be added but are not necessary PORTER Eight quarters pale malt six quarters amber malt two quarters brown malt Mash it twice with fifty five and forty eight barrels of water then boil with one hundredweight of Kent hops and set with ten gallons yeast seven pounds salt two pounds flour Twenty barrels of good table beer may be had from the grains If deficient in color add burnt malt PORTER FOR BOTTLING Five quarters pale malt three quarters amber malt two quarters brown malt burnt malt to color if required Mash with twenty four fourteen and eleven barrels of water then boil with one hundredweight Kent hops and set with seven gallons yeast three pounds salt Mash the grains for table beer PORT WINE To ten gallons prepared cider add one and one half gallons good port wine two and one half quarts wild grapes clusters two ounces bruised rhatany root three quarters ounce tincture of kino three quarters pound loaf sugar one half gallon spirits Let this stand ten days color if too light with tincture of rhatany then rack it off and fine it This should be repeated until the color is perfect and the liquid clear PORT WINE BRITISH 1 Two gallons damson juice two gallons cider three quarters ounce sloe juice one pound sugar one pound honey Ferment then add one quart spirit one gallon red cape a little over one ounce of red tartar dissolved the same of powder of catechu one tenth ounce bruised ginger one tenth ounce cassia a few cloves Mix well with two tablespoonfuls of brandy coloring 2 Two pounds bullace ten pounds damsons one and one half gallons water Boil the water skim it and pour it boiling hot on the fruit let it stand four or six days at least During that time bruise the fruit or squeeze it with your hands Then draw or pour it off into a cask and to every gallon of liquor put two pounds and a half of fine sugar or rather more put some yeast on a slice of bread warm to work it When done working put a little brandy into the cask and fill it up Bung it up close and let it stand six or twelve months then bottle it off This wine is nearer in flavor to port than any other If made with cold water it will be equally as good but of a different color 3 Five gallons cider one gallon elder juice one gallon port wine one and one quarter pint brandy one and one fifth ounces red tartar one fifth ounce catechu one gill finings one ounce logwood Mix well and bung close TO MAKE QUINCE WINE Take your quinces when they are thoroughly ripe wipe off the fur very clean then take out the cores bruise them as you do apples for cider and press them adding to every gallon of juice two and one half pounds of fine sugar

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  • File:Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent, Sussex, and Surrey.djvu - Wikisource, the free online library
    Book and those of more recent days including comparative lists of the churches and some account of the Sepulchral Memorials and othe File usage More than 100 pages link to this file The following list shows the first 100 page links to this file only A full list is available Wikisource Proofread of the Month Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 1 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 10 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 100 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 109 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 11 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 111 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 112 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 12 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 127 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 128 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 129 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 13 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 130 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 14 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 15 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 179 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 181 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 182 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 188 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 189 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 19 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 190 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 2 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 200 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 201 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 202 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 211 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 212 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey djvu 214 Page Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent

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  • Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent, Sussex, and Surrey - Wikisource, the free online library
    REV ARTHUR HUSSEY M A LONDON JOHN RUSSELL SMITH 36 SOHO SQUARE MDCCCLII LONDON PRINTED BY E Tucker Frith Street Soho CONTENTS page Preface iii KENT Introduction 1 Explanation of the arrangement in the Comparative List Abbreviations c 5 Comparative List of the Churches 7 Notes on the Churches 19 Addenda 170 SUSSEX Introduction 171 Comparative List of the Churches 174 Notes on the Churches 183 Addenda 310 SURREY Introduction 313 Comparative List of the Churches 313 Notes on the Churches 318 Addenda General Index 347 Supplement 365 Kent 365 Sussex 372 Surrey 372 Index to Supplement 381 List of Subscribers 383 LIST OF ENGRAVINGS page Allington Church 20 Boughton Malherb Church 36 East Farleigh Church 67 Hawkhurst Church 76 Niche in Leybourne Church 92 Font in Rolvenden Church 143 Seal of the Grammar School Sevenoaks 148 Roman Altar at Stone in the Isle of Oxney 154 Tenterden Church 158 Woldham Church 166 Bodiam Church 201 Piscina in West Bourne Church 205 Font in Brighton Church 206 Chidingly Church 213 Doorway Etchingham Church 224 East Hoathly Church Remains of West Blatchington Church 239 Northiam Church 261 Wigsell Salehurst 282 Compton Church 324 Brass in Cranley Church 325 Reredos in St Mary s Church Guildford North Transept of the Old Church Dorking 331 Font in Shere Church 341 This work was published before January 1 1923 and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent Sussex and Surrey oldid 3428222 Categories 1852 works PD old Surrey Sussex Kent Church of England Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views

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  • Arthur Hussey - Wikisource, the free online library
    Sussex and Surrey 1852 Works by this author published before January 1 1923 are in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Translations or editions published later may be copyrighted Posthumous works may be copyrighted based on how long they have been published in certain countries and areas Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 309842440 English Wikisource 498488 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author Arthur Hussey oldid 5659380 Categories Authors Hu 1794 births Early modern authors 1862 deaths Male authors Author PD old English authors United Kingdom authors Clergymen Hidden categories Author pages without image Author pages with gender in Wikidata Author pages connected to Wikidata Author pages with authority control data VIAF not on Wikisource Author pages with VIAF on Wikidata Obituaries available Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Author Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item Cite this page

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