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  • Dante Alighieri - Wikisource, the free online library
    spiritual autobiography The Rime collection of poetry Convivio De Monarchia Works About Dante Dante in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 Dante Alighieri in Catholic Encyclopedia 1913 Dante in The Harvard Classics Lectures on The Harvard Classics Volume 51 1914 by Charles Hall Grandgent On His Works Review of Lord Vernon s Inferno Di Dante 1869 by Sir Frederick Pollock External scan The Divina Commedia and Canzoniere of Dante Alighieri by Edward Hayes Plumptre External scan Works by this author published before January 1 1923 are in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Translations or editions published later may be copyrighted Posthumous works may be copyrighted based on how long they have been published in certain countries and areas Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 97105654 LCCN n78095495 ISNI 0000 0001 2144 6210 GND 118523708 SELIBR 183027 SUDOC 026811081 BNF cb118985852 ULAN 500265888 NLA 36583628 NDL 00437214 NKC jn19990001625 CiNii DA00360083 SBN IT ICCU CFIV 008732 DBNL dant001 PTBNP 25800 NTA 068727046 BAV ADV10159444 NUKAT n96017200 Project Gutenberg 507 Find a Grave 5101 BNE XX1153531 Open Library OL5988928A IMDB nm0019604 Freebase m 028p0 GEC 0021438 English Wikisource 2307 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author Dante Alighieri oldid 5644312 Categories Authors Al 1265 births Medieval authors 1321 deaths Male authors Author PD old Italian authors Medieval poets Political theorists Roman Catholics Hidden categories Author pages with image Author pages with gender in Wikidata Author pages connected to Wikidata AC with 25 elements Author pages with authority control data Pages using authority control with parameters Author pages with VIAF on Wikidata Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Author Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main

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  • The Divine Comedy/Inferno/Canto IV - Wikisource, the free online library
    in that Limbo were suspended Tell me my Master tell me thou my Lord Began I with desire of being certain Of that Faith which o ercometh every error Came any one by his own merit hence Or by another s who was blessed thereafter And he who understood my covert speech Replied I was a novice in this state When I saw hither come a Mighty One With sign of victory incoronate Hence he drew forth the shade of the First Parent And that of his son Abel and of Noah Of Moses the lawgiver and the obedient Abraham patriarch and David king Israel with his father and his children And Rachel for whose sake he did so much And others many and he made them blessed And thou must know that earlier than these Never were any human spirits saved We ceased not to advance because he spake But still were passing onward through the forest The forest say I of thick crowded ghosts Not very far as yet our way had gone This side the summit when I saw a fire That overcame a hemisphere of darkness We were a little distant from it still But not so far that I in part discerned not That honourable people held that place O thou who honourest every art and science Who may these be which such great honour have That from the fashion of the rest it parts them And he to me The honourable name That sounds of them above there in thy life Wins grace in Heaven that so advances them In the mean time a voice was heard by me All honour be to the pre eminent Poet His shade returns again that was departed After the voice had ceased and quiet was Four mighty shades I saw approaching us Semblance had they nor sorrowful nor glad To say to me began my gracious Master Him with that falchion in his hand behold Who comes before the three even as their lord That one is Homer Poet sovereign He who comes next is Horace the satirist The third is Ovid and the last is Lucan Because to each of these with me applies The name that solitary voice proclaimed They do me honour and in that do well Thus I beheld assemble the fair school Of that lord of the song pre eminent Who o er the others like an eagle soars When they together had discoursed somewhat They turned to me with signs of salutation And on beholding this my Master smiled And more of honour still much more they did me In that they made me one of their own band So that the sixth was I mid so much wit Thus we went on as far as to the light Things saying tis becoming to keep silent As was the saying of them where I was We came unto a noble castle s foot Seven times encompassed with lofty walls Defended round

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  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - Wikisource, the free online library
    Building of the Ship 1850 The Burial of the Poet 1880 Cadenabbia The Castle Builder Castles in Spain Catawba Wine 1858 The Challenge The Chamber over the Gate 1880 Changed Charlemagne 1863 Charles Sumner 1874 To Charles Sumner in Littell s Living Age 128 1655 1874 later published as part of Three Friends of Mine Chaucer Children The Children s Crusade The Children s Hour 1860 Chimes Christmas Bells 1863 Chrysaor 1850 The City and the Sea The Cobbler of Hagenau 1863 The Cross of Snow 1879 The Cumberland A Day of Sunshine Daybreak Daylight and Moonlight Decoration Day Delia The Discoverer of the North Cape Divina Commedia 1867 A Dutch Picture Elegiac 1880 Elegiac Verse Elizabeth 1863 Emma and Eginhard 1863 The Emperor s Bird s Nest The Emperor s Glove Enceladus Epimetheus or the Poet s Afterthought The Falcon of Ser Federigo 1863 Fata Morgana The Fiftieth Birthday of Agassiz 1857 The Fire of Drift Wood 1850 Flower de Luce 1867 Four by the Clock The Four Lakes of Madison A Fragment From my Arm Chair 1879 From my Armchair in Littell s Living Age 141 1818 Gaspar Becerra 1850 Giotto s Tower 1867 The Golden Mile Stone 1857 Haroun Al Raschid The Haunted Chamber Haunted Houses Hawthorne 1867 Helen of Tyre 1880 Hermes Trismegistus The Herons of Elmwood Hymn for My Brother s Ordination 1850 In the Churchyard at Cambridge Inscription on the Shanklin Fountain The Iron Pen 1880 The Jewish Cemetery at Newport Jugurtha 1880 Kambalu 1863 Killed at the Ford 1867 King Robert of Sicily 1863 King Trisanku King Witlaf s Drinking Horn 1850 The Ladder of St Augustine Lady Wentworth 1863 The Leap of Roushan Beg The Legend Beautiful 1863 The Legend of Rabbi Ben Levi 1863 The Lighthouse 1850 Loss and Gain Mad River Maiden and Weathercock 1880 The Meeting Memories The Monk of Casa Maggiore 1863 Monte Cassino Moonlight The Mother s Ghost 1863 My Books My Cathedral 1880 My Lost Youth Night 1880 Noel Old St David s at Radnor 1880 Oliver Basselin The Open Window 1850 Palingenesis 1867 Paul Revere s Ride 1863 Pegasus in Pound 1850 The Phantom Ship Poem of Scanderbeg 1863 The Poet and his Songs The Poet s Calendar Possibilities President Garfield 1881 Prometheus or the Poet s Forethought Resignation 1850 The Revenge of Rain in the Face The Rhyme of Sir Christopher 1863 Robert Burns 1880 The Ropewalk Sand of the Desert in an Hour Glass 1850 Sandalphon Santa Filomena Scanderbeg Seaweed 1850 The Secret of the Sea 1850 The Sermon of St Francis The Sifting of Peter 1880 The Singers 1850 Sir Humphrey Gilbert 1850 Snow Flakes Something Left Undone Song Stay Stay at Home my Heart and Rest Songo River Sonnet on Mrs Kemble s Reading from Shakespeare 1850 Sundown Suspiria 1850 Tegner s Drapa 1850 There Was a Little Girl The Three Kings The Tide Rises the Tide Falls 1880 The Tides in Littell s Living Age 128 1655 To morrow 1867

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  • The Divine Comedy/Inferno/Canto VI - Wikisource, the free online library
    muzzles filth begrimed Of Cerberus the demon who so thunders Over the souls that they would fain be deaf We passed across the shadows which subdues The heavy rain storm and we placed our feet Upon their vanity that person seems They all were lying prone upon the earth Excepting one who sat upright as soon As he beheld us passing on before him O thou that art conducted through this Hell He said to me recall me if thou canst Thyself wast made before I was unmade And I to him The anguish which thou hast Perhaps doth draw thee out of my remembrance So that it seems not I have ever seen thee But tell me who thou art that in so doleful A place art put and in such punishment If some are greater none is so displeasing And he to me Thy city which is full Of envy so that now the sack runs over Held me within it in the life serene You citizens were wont to call me Ciacco For the pernicious sin of gluttony I as thou seest am battered by this rain And I sad soul am not the only one For all these suffer the like penalty For the like sin and word no more spake he I answered him Ciacco thy wretchedness Weighs on me so that it to weep invites me But tell me if thou knowest to what shall come The citizens of the divided city If any there be just and the occasion Tell me why so much discord has assailed it And he to me They after long contention Will come to bloodshed and the rustic party Will drive the other out with much offence Then afterwards behoves it this one fall Within three suns and rise again the other By force of him who now is on the coast High will it hold its forehead a long while Keeping the other under heavy burdens Howe er it weeps thereat and is indignant The just are two and are not understood there Envy and Arrogance and Avarice Are the three sparks that have all hearts enkindled Here ended he his tearful utterance And I to him I wish thee still to teach me And make a gift to me of further speech Farinata and Tegghiaio once so worthy Jacopo Rusticucci Arrigo and Mosca And others who on good deeds set their thoughts Say where they are and cause that I may know them For great desire constraineth me to learn If Heaven doth sweeten them or Hell envenom And he They are among the blacker souls A different sin downweighs them to the bottom If thou so far descendest thou canst see them But when thou art again in the sweet world I pray thee to the mind of others bring me No more I tell thee and no more I answer Then his straightforward eyes he turned askance Eyed me a little and then bowed

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  • File:The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri, Translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Inferno, Canto V.ogg - Wikisource, the free online library
    Alighieri Translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Inferno Canto V ogg The Divine Comedy Inferno Canto V Date Source http librivox org the divine comedy by dante alighieri Author Writed by Dante Alighieri Translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Read by Cori Samuel Other versions http www archive org download divine comedy librivox divinecomedy longfellow 01 dante 64kb mp3 Licensing edit The copyright holder of this work allows anyone to use it for any purpose including unrestricted redistribution commercial use and modification Please check the source to verify that this is correct In particular note that publication on the Internet like publication by any other means does not in itself imply permission to redistribute Files without valid permission should be tagged with subst npd Usage notes If the work requires attribution use Attribution instead If this is your own work please use Cc zero instead Copyrighted free use commons wikimedia org wiki File The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri Translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Inferno Canto V ogg File history Click on a date time to view the file as it appeared at that time Date Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12 11 11 April 2008 Sorry your browser either has JavaScript disabled or does not have any supported player You can download the clip or download a player to play the clip in your browser 8 min 28 s 3 75 MB Yanngeffrotin commonswiki Information Description The Divine Comedy Inferno Canto V Source http librivox org the divine comedy by dante alighieri Date Author Writed by Dante Alighieri Translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Read by http www piratelibrary File usage The following page links to this file The Divine Comedy Inferno Canto V Metadata This file contains additional information probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create

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  • File:Blake Dante Hell V.jpg - Wikisource, the free online library
    Unknown Licensing edit This is a faithful photographic reproduction of a two dimensional public domain work of art The work of art itself is in the public domain for the following reason Public domain Public domain false false This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 100 years or less You must also include a United States public domain tag to indicate why this work is in the public domain in the United States This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law including all related and neighboring rights The official position taken by the Wikimedia Foundation is that faithful reproductions of two dimensional public domain works of art are public domain This photographic reproduction is therefore also considered to be in the public domain in the United States In other jurisdictions re use of this content may be restricted see Reuse of PD Art photographs for details File history Click on a date time to view the file as it appeared at that time Date Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 06 47 28 September 2006 1 232 910 309 KB Meladina BLAKE William b 1757 London d 1827 London The Lovers Whirlwind Francesca da Rimini and Paolo Malatesta The scene is from Dante s Divine Comedy Hell Canto V 37 138 1824 27 Pen and ink and watercolour 374 x 530 mm City Museum and Art Galler File usage The following page links to this file The Divine Comedy Inferno Canto V Global file usage The following other wikis use this file Usage on de wikipedia org Benutzer Mayer Bruno Bilder Usage on en wikipedia org William Blake Medievalism Usage on en wikiquote org

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  • The Divine Comedy/Inferno/Canto V - Wikisource, the free online library
    the spirits maledict It hither thither downward upward drives them No hope doth comfort them for evermore Not of repose but even of lesser pain And as the cranes go chanting forth their lays Making in air a long line of themselves So saw I coming uttering lamentations Shadows borne onward by the aforesaid stress Whereupon said I Master who are those People whom the black air so castigates The first of those of whom intelligence Thou fain wouldst have then said he unto me The empress was of many languages To sensual vices she was so abandoned That lustful she made licit in her law To remove the blame to which she had been led She is Semiramis of whom we read That she succeeded Ninus and was his spouse She held the land which now the Sultan rules The next is she who killed herself for love And broke faith with the ashes of Sichaeus Then Cleopatra the voluptuous Helen I saw for whom so many ruthless Seasons revolved and saw the great Achilles Who at the last hour combated with Love Paris I saw Tristan and more than a thousand Shades did he name and point out with his finger Whom Love had separated from our life After that I had listened to my Teacher Naming the dames of eld and cavaliers Pity prevailed and I was nigh bewildered And I began O Poet willingly Speak would I to those two who go together And seem upon the wind to be so light And he to me Thou lt mark when they shall be Nearer to us and then do thou implore them By love which leadeth them and they will come Soon as the wind in our direction sways them My voice uplift I O ye weary souls Come speak to us if no one interdicts it As turtle doves called onward by desire With open and steady wings to the sweet nest Fly through the air by their volition borne So came they from the band where Dido is Approaching us athwart the air malign So strong was the affectionate appeal O living creature gracious and benignant Who visiting goest through the purple air Us who have stained the world incarnadine If were the King of the Universe our friend We would pray unto him to give thee peace Since thou hast pity on our woe perverse Of what it pleases thee to hear and speak That will we hear and we will speak to you While silent is the wind as it is now Sitteth the city wherein I was born Upon the sea shore where the Po descends To rest in peace with all his retinue Love that on gentle heart doth swiftly seize Seized this man for the person beautiful That was ta en from me and still the mode offends me Love that exempts no one beloved from loving Seized me with pleasure of this man so strongly That as thou

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  • Category:Subpages - Wikisource, the free online library
    A 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aa 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aal 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aalen 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aargau 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aaron s Rod 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abaca 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abacus 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abaddon 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abana 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abancourt Charles Xavier Joseph de Franqueville D 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abandonment 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abano Pietro D 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abatement 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abattoir 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abauzit Firmin 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Austin Canons 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Benedictine 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Bristol Cathedral 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Canterbury Cathedral 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Carthusians 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Cells 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Cistercian 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Citeaux 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Clairvaux 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Clermont 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Cluny 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey English Cluniac 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Fountains Abbey 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Hulne 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Kirkstall Abbey 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Mendicant Friars 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Norwich Gloucester 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Premonstratensians 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Santa Laura 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Vatopede 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey Westminster Abbey 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abbey York 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abdera 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abduction 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abettor 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abrogation 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abscess 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Absolute 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abstract of Title 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abu 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abundantia 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abutilon 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Abābda 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acacia 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acadian 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acanthocephala 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acceptilation 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Access 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Accession 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Accessory 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Accompaniment 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Accomplice 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Accordion 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acetic Acid 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acheron 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acholi 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acis 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acne 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acorus Calamus 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Acroterium 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Actaeon 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Adad 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Adagio 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Addax 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Adder 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Adelaide 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Adenine 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Admetus 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Adonis mythology 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Adrian city 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Adze 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aeacus 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aedui 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aeolian Harp 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aeolus 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aequi 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Afghanistan 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica African Lily 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Afridi 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aga 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Agapetus deacon 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Agasias 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Agriculture Ancient Husbandry 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Agriculture History of English Agriculture 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Agrimony 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Agrionia 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Agroteras Thusia 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Ague 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aire 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Akkad 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alabama River 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alabaster 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alastor 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Albania 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Albatross 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alcestis 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alcmaeon 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alcmene 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Aleurites 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alexander 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alexanders 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alexandria 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alexandria Virginia 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Alexandrite 1911 Encyclopædia

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