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  • Century Magazine/Volume 57/Issue 4/Cole's Old English Masters. John Opie - Wikisource, the free online library
    their joint prospects and the year after they went up to London It was agreed that they should share fortune alike Opie to work with his brush and Wolcott to point out his wonderfulness with pen and tongue but after a year to quote Wolcott my pupil told me I could return to the country as he could now do for himself In the meantime Wolcott had pushed the Wonder into notice Reynolds had commended his work and declared it like Caravaggio and Velasquez in one he had been introduced at court and given commissions by the king and a mob of fashionables had gone daft over his heads of beggars The rage was violent while it lasted Its subsidence was violent too but it did not leave Opie totally neglected Some friends stood by him he was a faithful worker and he went on painting portraits with unabated energy All his life he was a student and in the end he became a painter of force and considerable invention He was elected a Royal Academician and in 1805 he was the Academy s professor of painting delivering several rather remarkable discourses after the Reynolds initiative He was married twice the second Mrs Opie being the novelist over whose productions our grandmothers shed some intermittent tears in the years past Opie seems to have been self taught and no one knows how he took his bent toward broad masses of light and shade and rather coarse handling It is easy to say that he was influenced by Rembrandt and Caravaggio but there is no record that he knew anything about either of these painters Indeed it is more reasonable to assume that his hand was rather coarse by nature and that he painted in broad masses because he had neither the delicacy nor the skill to paint otherwise He never at any time approximated a worker in cloisonné His line was heavy with little grace about it his contours were square turned his light was wanting in subtlety and his surfaces were rough and painty Yet perhaps these very defects made up his redeeming feature strength The simplicity of the means gave the feeling of rugged power Its resemblance to the strength of Velasquez however was entirely superficial Opie was only a tyro with the brush where Velasquez was a passed master His art gathered force from his artlessness and some of his boldest effects were the result of his untutored simplicity Opie s success however is not to be belittled He did no more with the historical canvas than his contemporaries but among the five hundred portraits that he painted there are some of remarkable vigor The portrait of Mary Wollstonecraft wife of William Godwin and mother of the second Mrs Shelley which Mr Cole has engraved 2 is one of the best known of his works and is a striking study in character The reverie in which the subject seems steeped is well given though the workmanship is

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  • Charles von Hügel - Wikisource, the free online library
    verbatim translation kindly made by her for my mother of Dr Wiesner s speech which induced me last year to defer no longer the collection of material for these Memoirs Nor would they have even now appeared had it not been for the unfailing sympathy and ever ready help which l have received from my wife throughout the course of their compilation I hope later to amplify these Memoirs with notices of various members of my father s family and to give other particulars of his own life including a sketch of his early years written by himself for his children and reprints of the letters from him to my mother concerning the flight of Prince Metternich in 1848 published by my brother in the National Review for June 1883 Of the memoirs now reprinted two were written by old and valued friends of my parents Lady Georgiana Fullerton and Baron von Reumont The third the address by Dr Wiesner at the unveiling of the Hügeldenkmal has an interest of its own as coming from one who without any personal knowledge of my father grew through years of botanical research not only to value his scientific attainments but also greatly to esteem and admire his character I cannot allow this opportunity to pass without expressing the deep gratitude felt by my mother my brother and myself to Dr Wiesner and to the Verein der Gärtner und Gartenfreunde in Hietzing of which he was the mouth piece for having revived in Austria the memory of my father s work I have to thank the Autotype Company for the care which they have bestowed on the excellent reproductions of portraits given in this volume the negatives for which were at considerable trouble kindly taken for me by Mr H A Chapman of the Fitzwilliam Museum I add a plate representing the Patron s Medal of the Royal Geographical Society of London to the list of distinctions received by my father He valued this medal given for his explorations in Cashmere and the Armee Kreuz commemorative of the 1813 14 campaign of which I also give a figure perhaps more than any of his other decorations for they he used to say meant real hard work The 1849 medal given by Pope Pius IX see page xx commemorates a remarkable episode in the history of the Church which rises vividly to mind at this moment when the death of Leo XIII the illustrious successor of Pius IX in the Chair of Peter is hourly expected ANATOLE von HÜGEL Croft Cottage Cambridge July 17 1903 TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE List of Illustrations xiii Events in the life of Charles von Hügel xv Distinctions conferred on Charles von Hügel xix Inscription on the Hügeldenkmal 4 Memorial Address delivered at the unveiling of the Hügeldenkmal at Hietzing near Vienna October 3 1901 by Hofrath Dr Julius Wiesner Professor of Botany at the University of Vienna Translated from the German 5 Biographical Sketch by Alfred Baron von

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  • A Christmas Carol (Dickens, 1843) - Wikisource, the free online library
    THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS 39 PAGE STAVE III THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS 74 PAGE STAVE IV THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS 121 PAGE STAVE V THE END OF IT 152 Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title A Christmas Carol Dickens 1843 oldid 6034861 Categories Featured texts 1843 works Christmas Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in

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  • Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper (Dalziel) - Wikisource, the free online library
    one of these she turned into a coachman and the other into a postilion The old lady then told Cinderella to go into the garden and seek for half a dozen lizards These she changed into six footmen dressed in the gayest livery When all these things had been done the kind godmother touching her with her wand changed her worn out clothes into a beautiful ball dress embroidered with pearls and silver She then gave her a pair of glass slippers that is they were woven of the most delicate spun glass fine as the web of a spider When Cinderella was thus attired her godmother made her get into her splendid coach giving her a caution to leave the ball before the clock struck twelve On her arrival her beauty struck everybody with wonder The gallant Prince gave her a courteous welcome and led her into the ball room and the King and Queen were as much enchanted with her as the Prince conducted her to the supper table and was too much occupied in waiting upon her to partake of anything himself While seated Cinderella heard the clock strike three quarters past eleven She rose to leave the Prince pressing her to accept an invitation for the ball on the following evening On reaching home her godmother praised her for being so punctual and agreed to let her go to the next night s ball Although she seemed to be tired her sisters instead of showing pity teased her with glowing accounts of the splendid scene they had just left and spoke particularly of the beautiful Princess Cinderella was delighted to hear all this and asked them the name of the Princess but they replied nobody knew her So much did they say in praise of the lady that Cinderella expressed a desire to go to the next ball to see the Princess but this only served to bring out their dislike of poor Cinderella still more and they would not lend her the meanest of their dresses The next evening the two sisters went to the ball and Cinderella also who was still more splendidly dressed than before Her enjoyment was even greater than at the first ball and she was so occupied with the Prince s tender sayings that she was not so quick in marking the progress of time To her alarm she heard the clock strike twelve She fled from the ball room but in a moment the coach changed again to a pumpkin the horses to mice the coachman and postilion to rats the footmen to lizards and Cinderella s beautiful dress to her old shabby clothes In her haste she dropped one of her glass slippers and reached home out of breath with none of her godmother s fairy gifts but one glass slipper When her sisters arrived after the ball they spoke in terms of rapture of the unknown Princess and told Cinderella about the little glass slipper she had

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  • The Clipper Ship Era - Wikisource, the free online library
    stated being from the most reliable records that can be obtained So far as I am aware no account of these vessels has ever been written beyond a few magazine and newspaper articles necessarily incomplete and often far from accurate while most of the men who knew these famous ships have now passed away It seems proper therefore that some account of this remarkable era should be recorded by one who has a personal knowledge of the most exciting portion of it and of many of the men and ships that made it what it was Of late years there has been a confusing mixture of the terms knot and mile as applied to the speed of vessels As most persons are aware there are three kinds of mile the geographical statute and sea mile or knot The geographical mile is based on a measure upon the surface of the globe and is a mathematical calculation which should be used by experts only The statute mile instituted by the Romans is a measure of 5280 feet The sea mile or knot is one sixtieth of a degree of latitude and while this measurement varies slightly in different latitudes owing to the elliptical shape of the globe for practical purposes the knot may be taken as 6080 feet The word knot is now frequently used to express long distances at sea This is an error as the term knot should be used only to denote an hourly rate of speed for instance to say that a vessel is making nine knots means that she is going through the water at the rate of nine knots an hour but it would be incorrect to say that she made thirty six knots in four hours here the term miles should be used meaning sea miles or knots The term knot is simply a unit of speed and is derived from the knots marked on the old fashioned log line and graduated to a twenty eight second log glass which was usually kept in the binnacle In this book the word mile means a sea mile and not a geographical or statute mile I wish to make my grateful acknowledgment to the Hydrographic Office at Washington the British Museum Lloyd s Register of Shipping the American Bureau of Shipping the Boston Athenæeum and the Astor Library for much of the data contained in this book A H C New York 1910 CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I American Shipping to the Close of the War of 1812 1 II British Shipping after 1815 The East India Company 19 III The North Atlantic Packet Ships 1815 1850 38 IV Opium Clippers and Early Clipper Ships 1838 1848 57 V Two Early Clipper Ship Commanders 73 VI The Repeal of the British Navigation Laws The Oriental 88 VII The Rush for California A Sailing Day 100 VIII The Clipper Ship Crews 119 IX California Clippers of 1850 and their Commanders Maury s Wind and Current Charts 134 X

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  • Come not, when I am dead - Wikisource, the free online library
    drop thy foolish tears upon my grave To trample round my fallen head And vex the unhappy dust thou wouldst not save There let the wind sweep and the plover cry But thou go by Child if it were thine error or thy crime I care no longer being all unblest Wed whom thou wilt but I am sick of Time And I desire to rest Pass on weak heart and leave me where I lie Go by go by This work was published before January 1 1923 and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Come not when I am dead oldid 4322789 Categories 1842 works Featured texts Early modern poetry Elegies Poems PD old Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Display Options Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item

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  • The Corsair (Byron, 1814) - Wikisource, the free online library
    1 1923 and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title The Corsair Byron 1814 oldid 4744213 Categories Featured texts 1814 works PD old Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More

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  • Daisy Miller: A Study (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879) - Wikisource, the free online library
    according to Act of Congress in the year 1878 by Harper Brothers In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington Part 1 Part 2 This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1916 so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 99 years or less This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Daisy Miller A Study New York Harper and Brothers 1879 oldid 4848400 Categories Featured texts 1879 works PD old 99 1923 Novellas Hidden category Pages with noyear Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Display Options Tools What links here Related

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