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  • Makers of British botany - Wikisource, the free online library
    Robert Brown 1773 1858 By J B Farmer 108 Sir William Hooker 1785 1865 By F O Bower 126 John Stevens Henslow 1796 1861 By George Henslow 151 John Lindley 1799 1865 By Frederick Keeble 164 William Griffith 1810 1845 By W H Lang 178 Arthur Henfrey 1819 1859 By F W Oliver 192 William Henry Harvey 1811 1866 By R Lloyd Praeger 204 Miles Joseph Berkeley 1803 1889 By George Massee 225 Sir Joseph Henry Gilbert 1817 1901 By W B Bottomley 233 William Crawford Williamson 1816 1895 By Dukinfield H Scott 243 Harry Marshall Ward 1854 1906 By Sir William Thiselton Dyer 261 A sketch of the Professors of Botany in Edinburgh from 1670 until 1887 By Isaac Bayley Balfour 280 Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker 1817 1911 By F O Bower 302 Index 324 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS PLATE To face p Frontispiece John Hutton Balfour 1878 I Robert Morison 8 II Great Gate of the Physic Garden Oxford 18 III John Ray 28 IV Nehemiah Grew 1701 44 V Plate from Anatomy of Vegetables Begun 1672 48 VI Facsimile of a page from The Comparative Anatomy of Trunks Nehemiah Grew 1675 52 VII From Grew s Anatomy Sheweth the Parts of a Goosberry Part of a Vine Branch cut transversly and splitt half way downe y e midle 56 VIII Stephen Hales 1759 65 IX Plate 18 from Hales s Vegetable Staticks 82 X John Hill 84 XI Robert Brown circa 1856 108 XII Sir William Jackson Hooker 1834 126 XIII John Stevens Henslow 1851 151 XIV John Lindley 164 XV William Griffith 1843 178 XVI From Griffith s Notulae Median section of the ovule of Cycas Nucellar apex of Cycas with pollen chamber and pollen grains 188 XVII William Henry Harvey 204 XVIII Miles Joseph Berkeley 225

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  • Mexico, as it was and as it is - Wikisource, the free online library
    to settle the domestic differences in the family of a neighbor who lives unhappily with his wife I beg leave however to dissent from this opinion Mexico is not merely a social neighbor whose rights are guarded and whose offences are punished by municipal laws but she is one of the great family of nations on this Continent striving to free herself from the tutelage under which she groaned for three centuries while the Spanish yoke hung round her neck She is bound by international ties pledged in international treaties burthened with international contracts and above all loaded with debts to foreigners growing not only out of regular loans but forced from individuals by exactions wrongs personal injury and enormous injustice The whole foreign world is therefore directly interested in this distracted realm independently of the concern that all Christian men must feel in the progress of nations but of all parts of Christendom none has so deep a stake in it as these United States If as in France since the fearful revolution of 98 each popular outbreak had been but a feebler swing of the great democratic pendulum bringing it nearer and nearer to repose and tranquillity we should bid these people God speed and hail them heartily on their way to republican greatness But instead of approaches to peace and happiness the pendulum of Mexican revolutions has swung with each vibration further and further from the centre of gravity so that instead of poising at length like a plummet above the Truth and the Right it is now converted into a vast weapon whose terrific gyrations threaten with ruin everything within the scope of its tremendous whirl There is however another view of the matter which should have weight in the consideration of Mexican affairs A recent letter from Yucatan received at New Orleans by way of Mexico says The people of Yucatan are in daily expectation of declaring the independence of that province Offences on the part of the Mexican Congress towards Yucatan have dictated this step Two assemblies composed of the most distinguished personages have already met to discuss the measure of separation and much is said of seeking assistance should it be necessary from the cabinet at Washington Nearly four years ago I took occasion in a private interview with a distinguished statesman then in power to indicate the probable disruption of the soi disant Republic of which this seems to be the premonitory symptom The people of the Mexican Provinces will no longer consent to be the prey of the central chiefs who make a Paris of the city of Mexico and control the nation when they hold the key of the capital Distracted dissatisfied divided fragmentary each one will perhaps set up for itself Zacetecas Durango Coahuila California and the rest going off in separate discontent and establishing themselves as petty principalities Each of these in the course of a few years will grow into little Mexicos The concentrated venom of the

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  • Mrs. Caudle's curtain lectures - Wikisource, the free online library
    Curtain Lectures BY DOUGLAS JERROLD WITH ALL THE ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHARLES KEENE JOHN LEECH RICHARD DOYLE From the Original Blocks With an Introduction and a Bibliography by WALTER JERROLD LONDON R BRIMLEY JOHNSON 8 YORK BUILDINGS ADELPHI W C BRADBURY AGNEW CO LD PRINTERS LONDON AND TONBRIDGE CONTENTS PAGE List of illustrations vii Bibliographical note xi Author s preface xxiii Introduction xxvii The curtain lectures 1 Bibliography 207 This work was published before January 1 1923 and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Mrs Caudle 27s curtain lectures oldid 5935301 Categories Featured texts 1866 works PD old Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read View source View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Display Options Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item Cite this page Download print Create a book Download as PDF Printable version In other languages Add

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  • No Treason - Wikisource, the free online library
    American Civil War Spooner therefore supports the secession of the South even though he was fiercely anti slavery Similarly he argues that the secessionists did not commit treason since they never signed the Constitution and therefore are not bound to it Spooner issued three pamphlets carrying the title of No Treason numbered 1 II and VI Spooner on publishing No VI wrote For reasons not necessary to be explained the sixth is now published in advance of the third fourth and fifth 32450 Versions of No Treason Lysander Spooner Versions of No Treason include No 1 1867 No II The Constitution 1867 No VI The Constitution of no Authority 1870 Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title No Treason oldid 4732109 Categories Featured texts Versions pages Political philosophy Political tracts Politics Anarchism Libertarianism Early modern works Hidden category Pages with noyearcat Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read View source View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Display Options Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent

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  • Orders to German Commanders on Surrender (5 May 1945) - Wikisource, the free online library
    will be responsible for the accuracy of the information you give and the delivery of such information within the prescribed time limits You will make no communication by wireless or any other means with any other German unit force place or station from the time of receipt of this order except communication may now be established with Field Marshal Busch You will allow no destruction removal or consignment of war material of any description including records and documents of any description within your area You will disarm all your personnel when ordered by me and dump war material in places as ordered You will be responsible for the maintenance and safeguarding of all United Nations personnel in your area You will be responsible for your own maintenance and will make application for authority to carry out such movement as will be necessary for that purpose You will retain all animals now in your possession and will be held responsible for their maintenance You will take under your command immediately all members of the Kasernierte Polizei and ensure that the above orders are applied to them You will take under your control and be responsible for the maintenance of all concentration camps in your area You will arrest all personnel connected with the camps other than the inmates You will be responsible for notifying all troops under your command of these orders You will report for future orders as directed by me and will be accompanied by officers of your staff as required by me from time to time Your attention is drawn to Military Government Ordinance Number 1 the provisions of which are applicable to you and your troops and a copy of which is attached You will be responsible for promulgating this ordinance to all troops under your command

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  • Poems by Wilfred Owen - Wikisource, the free online library
    he named Greater Love The importance of his contribution to the literature of the War cannot be decided by those who like myself both admired him as a poet and valued him as a friend His conclusions about War are so entirely in accordance with my own that I cannot attempt to judge his work with any critical detachment I can only affirm that he was a man of absolute integrity of mind He never wrote his poems as so many war poets did to make the effect of a personal gesture He pitied others he did not pity himself In the last year of his life he attained a clear vision of what he needed to say and these poems survive him as his true and splendid testament Wilfred Owen was born at Oswestry on 18th March 1893 He was educated at the Birkenhead Institute and matriculated at London University in 1910 In 1913 he obtained a private tutorship near Bordeaux where he remained until 1915 During this period he became acquainted with the eminent French poet Laurent Tailhade to whom he showed his early verses and from whom he received considerable encouragement In 1915 in spite of delicate health he joined the Artists Rifles O T C was gazetted to the Manchester Regiment and served with their 2nd Battalion in France from December 1916 to June 1917 when he was invalided home Fourteen months later he returned to the Western Front and served with the same Battalion ultimately commanding a Company He was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry while taking part in some heavy lighting on 1st October He was killed on 4th November 1918 while endeavouring to get his men across the Sambre Canal A month before his death he wrote to his mother My nerves are in perfect order I came out again in order to help these boys directly by leading them as well as an officer can indirectly by watching their sufferings that I may speak of them as well as a pleader can Let his own words be his epitaph Courage was mine and I had mystery Wisdom was mine and I had mastery SIEGFRIED SASSOON PREFACE This book is not about heroes English Poetry is not yet fit to speak of them Nor is it about deeds or lands nor anything about glory honour dominion or power except War Above all this book is not concerned with Poetry The subject of it is War and the pity of War The Poetry is in the pity Yet these elegies are not to this generation This is in no sense consolatory They may be to the next All the poet can do to day is to warn That is why the true Poets must be truthful If I thought the letter of this book would last I might have used proper names but if the spirit of it survives Prussia my ambition and those names will be content for they will have achieved

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  • Popular Science Monthly/Volume 1 - Wikisource, the free online library
    July 1872 Corals and Coral Architecture 257 The Physiology of Emotion 274 A Giant Planet 286 The Migrations of Men III 299 On the Digestibility of Vegetable and Animal Foods 308 Mr Martineau on Evolution 313 Musical Mice 323 The Study of Human Nature 327 Astro Meteorology 335 Iron and Civilization 339 Nervous Control of Animal Movements 344 Ventilation and the Reasons for it 356 Prof James D Dana 362 Editor s Table 366 Literary Notices 370 Miscellany 372 Notes 383 August 1872 The August and November Meteors 385 Modern Literatures in the Higher Education 396 The Nutritive Salts of Food 405 The Physiology of Sleep 411 Characteristics of the Calmucks 419 The Balance of Life in the Aquarium 434 Juries Judges and Insanity 440 Concerning Corpulence 445 The Study of Physical Science 451 Sight and the Visual Organ 457 On the Discovery of the Elements 474 The Causes of Physical Degeneracy 482 Sketch of Prof Gray 491 Editor s Table 496 Literary Notices 500 Miscellany 502 Notes 511 September 1872 The Study of Sociology III 513 Clever Fishes 529 Motions of the Stars 541 The Unconscious Action of the Brain 544 The Past and Future of Niagara 564 Yeast 573 Measurement of Earthquake Waves 586 School Dietaries 590 Scientific Dabblers 594 Town and Country as Producers of Intellect 600 Civilization as Accumulated Force 602 Popular Geology 613 On Moral Contagion 618 The Enemies We Import 620 Editor s Table 623 Literary Notices 627 Miscellany 637 Notes 640 October 1872 The Study of Sociology IV 641 A Glass of Water 655 Has our Climate Changed 665 As Regards Spiders 674 Man as the Interpreter of Nature 684 Physiological Influence of Condiments 701 English Against the Classics 707 The Transit of Venus 719 On the Derivation of American Plants 724 Visual

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  • The Problems of Philosophy - Wikisource, the free online library
    criticism seemed out of place For this reason theory of knowledge occupies a larger space than metaphysics in the present volume and some topics much discussed by philosophers are treated very briefly if at all I have derived valuable assistance from unpublished writings of Mr G E Moore and Mr J M Keynes from the former as regards the relations of sense data to physical objects and from the latter as regards probability and induction I have also profited greatly by the criticisms and suggestions of Professor Gilbert Murray CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I APPEARANCE AND REALITY 9 II THE EXISTENCE OF MATTER 26 III THE NATURE OF MATTER 42 IV IDEALISM 58 V KNOWLEDGE BY ACQUAINTANCE AND KNOWLEDGE BY DESCRIPTION 72 VI ON INDUCTION 93 VII ON OUR KNOWLEDGE OF GENERAL PRINCIPLES 109 VIII HOW A PRIORI KNOWLEDGE IS POSSIBLE 127 IX THE WORLD OF UNIVERSALS 142 X ON OUR KNOWLEDGE OF UNIVERSALS 158 XI ON INTUITIVE KNOWLEDGE 174 XII TRUTH AND FALSEHOOD 186 VIII KNOWLEDGE ERROR AND PROBABLE OPINION 204 XIV THE LIMITS OF PHILOSOPHICAL KNOWLEDGE 220 XV THE VALUE OF PHILOSOPHY 237 BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE 251 INDEX 253 This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1970 so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 30 years or less This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title The Problems of Philosophy oldid 5326594 Categories Featured texts 1912 works Spoken works PD old

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