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  • A specimen of the botany of New Holland - Wikisource, the free online library
    Edward Smith 1793 A SPECIMEN OF THE BOTANY OF NEW HOLLAND BY JAMES EDWARD SMITH M D F R S MEMBER OF THE ROYAL ACADEMIES OF TURIN UPSAL STOCKHOLM AND LISBON CORRESPONDENT OF THOSE OF MONTPELLIER AND DAUPHINY c c PRESIDENT OF THE LINNÆAN SOCIETY THE FIGURES BY JAMES SOWERBY F L S Tendebantque manus ripæ ulterioris amore Virg VOL I LONDON PRINTED BY J DAVIS PUBLISHED BY J SOWERBY NO 2 MEAD PLACE LAMBETH TO BE HAD AT NO 42 PATERNOSTER ROW AND OF THE TOWN AND COUNTRY BOOKSELLERS M DCC XCIII TO THOMAS WILSON ESQ F L S AT WHOSE PERSUASION THIS WORK WAS UNDERTAKEN AND ON WHOSE FRIENDLY COMMUNICATIONS IT IS FOUNDED THE FOLLOWING PAGES ARE INSCRIBED BY THE AUTHOR Preface Billardiera scandens Tetratheca juncea Ceratopetalum gummiferum Banksia spinulosa Goodenia ramosissima Platylobium formosum Embothrium speciosissimum Embothrium silaifolium Embothrium sericeum Embothrium buxifolium Pimelea linifolia Pultenaea stipularis Eucalyptus robusta Styphelia tubiflora Mimosa myrtifolia Mimosa hispidula This work was published before January 1 1923 and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title A specimen of the

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  • Stops of Various Quills - Wikisource, the free online library
    XVIII THE BURDEN XIX CALVARY XX CONSCIENCE XXI REWARD AND PUNISHMENT XXII SYMPATHY XXIII STATISTICS XXIV PARABLE XXV VISION XXVI SOCIETY XXVII GOOD SOCIETY XXVIII FRIENDS AND FOES XXIX SPHINX XXX MATERIALS OF A STORY XXXI THE KING DINES XXXII LABOR AND CAPITAL XXXIII EQUALITY XXXIV JUDGMENT DAY XXXV MORTALITY XXXVI ANOTHER DAY XXXVII SOME ONE ELSE XXXVIII LIFE XXXIX WEATHER BREEDER XL PEONAGE XLI RACE XLII TEMPERAMENT XLIII WHAT SHALL IT PROFIT This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1920 so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 80 years or less This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Stops of Various Quills oldid 3170368 Categories Featured texts 1895 works PD old 80 1923 United States authors Modern poets American poetry Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions

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  • Studies of a Biographer - Wikisource, the free online library
    The Story of Scott s Ruin 1 The Importation of German 38 Matthew Arnold 76 Jowett s Life 123 Oliver Wendell Holmes 160 Life of Tennyson 196 Pascal 241 volume 3 The following chapters are reprinted from articles which with three exceptions appeared in the National Review The chapter upon Huxley appeared in the Nineteenth Century that upon Milton in the Quarterly Review and the chapter In Praise of Walking in the Monthly Review I have to thank the proprietors of these periodicals for permission to republish them Leslie Stephen September 1902 CONTENTS page The Browning Letters 1 John Donne 36 John Ruskin 83 William Godwin s Novels 119 Walter Bagehot 155 Thomas Henry Huxley 188 James Anthony Froude 220 In Praise of Walking 254 volume 4 CONTENTS page Shakespeare as a Man 1 Southey s Letters 45 New Lights on Milton 86 Emerson 130 Anthony Trollope 168 Robert Louis Stevenson 206 The Cosmopolitan Spirit in Literature 247 This work was published before January 1 1923 and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Studies of

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  • Susan B. Anthony petition for remission of fine - Wikisource, the free online library
    the positions of your petitioner s counsel upon both of the legal questions presented holding that your petitioner was not entitled to vote and that if she voted in good faith in the belief that she had a right to vote it would constitute no defense the grounds of the decision on the last point being that your petitioner was bound to know that by law she was not a legal voter and that even if she voted in good faith in the contrary belief it constituted no defense to the crime with which she was charged The decision of the Judge upon those questions was read from a written document obviously and at the close of the reading the Judge said that the decision of those questions disposed of the case and left no question of fact for the jury and that he should therefore direct the jury to find a verdict of guilty The judge then said to the jury that the decision of the Court had disposed all of there was in the case and that he directed them to find a verdict of guilty and he instructed the clerk to enter such a verdict At this time before any entry had been made by the clerk your petitioner s counsel asked the Judge to submit the case to the jury and to give to the jury the following several instructions First That if the defendant at the time of voting believed that she had a right to vote and voted in good faith in that belief she was not guilty of the offence charged Second That in determining the question whether she did or did not believe that she had a right to vote the jury might take into consideration as bearing upon that question the advice which she received from the counsel to whom she applied Third That they might also take into consideration as bearing upon the question the fact that the inspectors considered the question and came to the conclusion that she had a right to vote Fourth That the jury had a right to find a general verdict of guilty or not guilty as they should believe that she had or had not been guilty of the offense described in the statute The Judge declined to submit the case to the jury upon any question whatever and directed them to render a verdict of guilty against your petitioner Your petitioner s counsel excepted to the decision of the Judge upon the legal questions and to his direction to the jury to find a verdict of guilty insisting that it was a direction which no court had a right to give in any criminal case The Judge then instructed the clerk to take the verdict and the clerk said Gentlemen of the jury hearken to your verdict as the court hath recorded it You say you find the defendant guilty of the offence charged So say you all No response whatever was made

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  • Tales (Poe)/The Black Cat - Wikisource, the free online library
    cat I remembered had been hung in a garden adjacent to the house Upon the alarm of fire this garden had been immediately filled by the crowd by some one of whom the animal must have been cut from the tree and thrown through an open window into my chamber This had probably been done with the view of arousing me from sleep The falling of other walls had compressed the victim of my cruelty into the substance of the freshly spread plaster the lime of which with the flames and the ammonia from the carcass had then accomplished the portraiture as I saw it Although I thus readily accounted to my reason if not altogether to my conscience for the startling fact just detailed it did not the less fail to make a deep impression upon my fancy For months I could not rid myself of the phantasm of the cat and during this period there came back into my spirit a half sentiment that seemed but was not remorse I went so far as to regret the loss of the animal and to look about me among the vile haunts which I now habitually frequented for another pet of the same species and of somewhat similar appearance with which to supply its place One night as I sat half stupefied in a den of more than infamy my attention was suddenly drawn to some black object reposing upon the head of one of the immense hogsheads of Gin or of Rum which constituted the chief furniture of the apartment I had been looking steadily at the top of this hogshead for some minutes and what now caused me surprise was the fact that I had not sooner perceived the object thereupon I approached it and touched it with my hand It was a black cat a very large one fully as large as Pluto and closely resembling him in every respect but one Pluto had not a white hair upon any portion of his body but this cat had a large although indefinite splotch of white covering nearly the whole region of the breast Upon my touching him he immediately arose purred loudly rubbed against my hand and appeared delighted with my notice This then was the very creature of which I was in search I at once offered to purchase it of the landlord but this person made no claim to it knew nothing of it had never seen it before I continued my caresses and when I prepared to go home the animal evinced a disposition to accompany me I permitted it to do so occasionally stooping and patting it as I proceeded When it reached the house it domesticated itself at once and became immediately a great favorite with my wife For my own part I soon found a dislike to it arising within me This was just the reverse of what I had anticipated but I know not how or why it was its evident fondness for myself rather disgusted and annoyed me By slow degrees these feelings of disgust and annoyance rose into the bitterness of hatred I avoided the creature a certain sense of shame and the remembrance of my former deed of cruelty preventing me from physically abusing it I did not for some weeks strike or otherwise violently ill use it but gradually very gradually I came to look upon it with unutterable loathing and to flee silently from its odious presence as from the breath of a pestilence What added no doubt to my hatred of the beast was the discovery on the morning after I brought it home that like Pluto it also had been deprived of one of its eyes This circumstance however only endeared it to my wife who as I have already said possessed in a high degree that humanity of feeling which had once been my distinguishing trait and the source of many of my simplest and purest pleasures With my aversion to this cat however its partiality for myself seemed to increase It followed my footsteps with a pertinacity which it would be difficult to make the reader comprehend Whenever I sat it would crouch beneath my chair or spring upon my knees covering me with its loathsome caresses If I arose to walk it would get between my feet and thus nearly throw me down or fastening its long and sharp claws in my dress clamber in this manner to my breast At such times although I longed to destroy it with a blow I was yet withheld from so doing partly by a memory of my former crime but chiefly let me confess it at once by absolute dread of the beast This dread was not exactly a dread of physical evil and yet I should be at a loss how otherwise to define it I am almost ashamed to own yes even in this felon s cell I am almost ashamed to own that the terror and horror with which the animal inspired me had been heightened by one of the merest chimeras it would be possible to conceive My wife had called my attention more than once to the character of the mark of white hair of which I have spoken and which constituted the sole visible difference between the strange beast and the one I had destroyed The reader will remember that this mark although large had been originally very indefinite but by slow degrees degrees nearly imperceptible and which for a long time my reason struggled to reject as fanciful it had at length assumed a rigorous distinctness of outline It was now the representation of an object that I shudder to name and for this above all I loathed and dreaded and would have rid myself of the monster had I dared it was now I say the image of a hideous of a ghastly thing of the Gallows oh mournful and terrible engine of horror

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  • The Times/1871/Obituary/The Late Mr. Charles Babbage, F.R.S. - Wikisource, the free online library
    themselves when they are analyzed into orders of differences an element an atom so to speak is arrived at from which by constant addition the numbers in the table may be formed It was the function of Mr Babbage s machine to perform this addition of differences by combinations of wheels acting upon each other in an order determined by a preliminary adjustment This working by differences gave it the name of the Difference Engine It has been repeatedly stated that the construction of this machine was suddenly suspended and that no reason was ever assigned for its suspension But the writer in the Dictionary already quoted above thus solves the mystery in which the matter has hitherto been shrouded In spite of the favourable report of a Commission appointed to inquire into the matter the Government were led by two circumstances to hesitate about proceeding further Firstly Mr Clements the engineer or machinist employed as his collaborateur suddenly withdrew all his skilled workmen from the work and what was worse removed all the valuable tools which had been employed upon it an act which is justified as strictly legal by Mr Weld in his History of the Royal Society though a plain common sense man of the world may reasonably doubt its equity as the tools themselves had been made at the joint expense of Mr Babbage and the Treasury Secondly says the same authority the idea of the Analytical Engine one that absorbed and contained as a small part of itself the Difference Engine arose before Mr Babbage Of course he could not help the fact that Alps upon Alps should arise in such matters and that when one great victory was achieved another and still greater battle remained to be faced and fought But no sooner did Mr Babbage like an honest man communicate the fact to the Government than the then Ministers with Sir Robert Peel and Mr H Goulburn at the head of the Treasury took alarm and scared at the prospect of untold expenses before them resolved to abandon the enterprise Mr Babbage apart from all help from the public purse had spent upon his machine as a pet hobby no small part of his private fortune a sum which has been variously estimated between 6 000 l and 17 000 l And so having resolved on not going further into the matter they offered Mr Babbage by way of compensation that the Difference Engine as constructed should remain as his own property an offer which the inventor very naturally declined to accept The engine together with the drawings of the machinery constructed and not constructed and many other contrivances connected with it extending it is said to some 400 or 500 drawings and plans was presented in 1843 to King s College London where we believe they are to be seen in the museum bearing their silent witness to great hopes dashed down to the ground or at all events to the indefinite

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  • The Time Machine (Heinemann text) - Wikisource, the free online library
    Heinemann text H G Wells 1895 Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter V Chapter VI Chapter VII Chapter VIII Chapter IX Chapter X Chapter XI Chapter XII Epilogue This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1946 so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 60 years or less This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title The Time Machine Heinemann text oldid 5238086 Categories 1895 works Featured texts PD old 60 1923 Early modern works Science fiction novels Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read View source View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Display Options Tools What links here

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  • Tracks of McKinlay and party across Australia - Wikisource, the free online library
    greatly dispelled this Australian sameness and in many parts substituted for scrub spinifex and parched ground the pleasant spectacle of lakes and running streams waving grass and flowery meadows Nevertheless a subdivision of the Journal into Chapters will be found acceptable We have succeeded in finding demarcation lines for eleven Chapters and at the beginning of each Chapter we have given a short précis of the subject At the beginning of the last Chapter we give the very interesting account of an Englishman James Morrill who had lived seventeen years with the Aborigines of the lower Burdekin and whose history lately reached us while occupied with this work With reference to the Illustrations the Publishers are indebted to the courtesy of the Proprietors of the Illustrated London News for permission to make use of three of the Lake Views and also of the Portraits of Burke and Wills and J McDouall Stuart The latter is taken from a photograph by Mr R S Stacey North Adelaide and is specially interesting from the fact that the background scene is a representation sketched by Mr Stuart himself of the shores of the Indian Ocean on the Northern coast of Australia The other Lake Views are from sketches supplied by Mr Davis and the Portraits of McKinlay and party are from a photograph supplied by the same gentleman As to the little canvas camp flying in all directions the Author in his Journal invokes the spirit or the pencil of Crowquill or the world known George to scratch that ludicrous scene It is hoped that our friend Mr C H Bennett has not unworthily caught the spirit both of the scene and the invocation The same gentleman has also it is believed adhered to nature and to truth in depicting the more serious scene of the alligators W W London June 1863 CONTENTS Page Dates of Australian Discovery Exploration and Settlement xv Introductory View RECENT AUSTRALIAN EXPLORATORY EXPEDITIONS Stuart s Expeditions 1858 1862 4 Burke and Wills Expedition 1860 1861 20 Landsborough s Expedition 1861 1862 27 McKinlay s Expedition 1861 1862 37 RESULTS OF RECENT EXPLORATION OF AUSTRALIA Physical Features and Climate 44 The Aboriginal Natives 62 The other Notabilia of the Way 67 The Outfit of an Australian Exploratory Party 69 Tributes to the Explorers 64 What is in the Future 66 CHAPTER I Adelaide to Blanchewater 71 CHAPTER II Blanchewater to the Depot Lake Buchanan 88 CHAPTER III Camp Life at the Depot 101 CHAPTER IV The Search for Burke and Wills 134 CHAPTER V Lake Buchanan to Lake Hodgkinson 169 CHAPTER VI Lake Hodgkinson to the Stony Desert 200 CHAPTER VII The Great Stony Desert 229 CHAPTER VIII Central District 281 CHAPTER IX Australia Traversed Tropical District 311 CHAPTER X Homeward Bound Carpentaria to Port Denison 341 CHAPTER XI The Return Home Port Denison to South Australia 390 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Page PORTRAITS OF J M c KINLAY J DAVIS R POOLE J C KIRBY AND P WYLDE Frontispiece

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