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  • The Tales of Mother Goose/Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper - Wikisource, the free online library
    they held on as if they had done nothing else their whole lives The fairy then said to Cinderella Well you see here a carriage fit to go to the ball in are you not pleased with it Oh yes she cried but must I go as I am in these rags Her godmother simply touched her with her wand and at the same moment her clothes were turned into cloth of gold and silver all decked with jewels This done she gave her a pair of the prettiest glass slippers in the whole world Being thus attired she got into the carriage her godmother commanding her above all things not to stay till after midnight and telling her at the same time that if she stayed one moment longer the coach would be a pumpkin again her horses mice her coachman a rat her footmen lizards and her clothes would become just as they were before She promised her godmother she would not fail to leave the ball before midnight She drove away scarce able to contain herself for joy The King s son who was told that a great princess whom nobody knew was come ran out to receive her He gave her his hand as she alighted from the coach and led her into the hall where the company were assembled There was at once a profound silence every one left off dancing and the violins ceased to play so attracted was every one by the singular beauties of the unknown newcomer Nothing was then heard but a confused sound of voices saying Ha how beautiful she is Ha how beautiful she is The King himself old as he was could not keep his eyes off her and he told the Queen under his breath that it was a long time since he had seen so beautiful and lovely a creature All the ladies were busy studying her clothes and head dress so that they might have theirs made next day after the same pattern provided they could meet with such fine materials and able hands to make them The King s son conducted her to the seat of honor and afterwards took her out to dance with him She danced so very gracefully that they all admired her more and more A fine collation was served but the young Prince ate not a morsel so intently was he occupied with her She went and sat down beside her sisters showing them a thousand civilities and giving them among other things part of the oranges and citrons with which the Prince had regaled her This very much surprised them for they had not been presented to her Cinderella heard the clock strike a quarter to twelve She at once made her adieus to the company and hastened away as fast as she could As soon as she got home she ran to find her godmother and after having thanked her she said she much wished she might

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Tales_of_Mother_Goose/Cinderella,_or_the_Little_Glass_Slipper (2016-02-13)
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  • Lewis Carroll - Wikisource, the free online library
    of Evaluation as Applied to Pi 1865 The Dynamics of a Parti cle 1865 Facts Figures and Fancies 1865 1868 The New Belfry of Christ Church Oxford 1873 The Vision of the Three T s 1873 The Blank Cheque 1874 An Easter Greeting 1876 Doublets a word puzzle 1879 external link The Game of Logic 1887 Eight or Nine Wise Words about Letter Writing 1890 Curiosissima Curatoria 1892 What the Tortoise Said to Achilles 1895 Symbolic logic 1896 part 1 The Lewis Carroll picture book Edited by Stuart Dodgson Collingwood 1899 external link Feeding the mind 1907 external link Works as by Charles L Dodgson edit A Guide to the Mathematical Student in Reading Reviewing and Working Examples 1864 external link An elementary treatise on determinants 1867 external link Euclid and His Modern Rivals 1879 second ed 1885 Euclid 1883 books I II book V The Principles of Parliamentary Representation 1884 Curiosa Mathematica Part I A New Theory of Parallels 1888 external link Curiosa Mathematica Part II Pillow Problems 1893 Works about Carroll edit The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll by S D Collingwood 1898 The Story of Lewis Carroll by Isa Bowman 1899 Dodgson Charles Lutwidge in Dictionary of National Biography Supplement London Smith Elder Co 1901 in 3 vols Dodgson Charles Lutwidge in A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature by John William Cousin London J M Dent Sons 1910 Dodgson Charles Lutwidge in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 Dodgson Charles Lutwidge in The New Student s Reference Work Chicago F E Compton and Co 1914 Works by this author published before January 1 1923 are in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Translations or editions published later may be copyrighted Posthumous works may be copyrighted based on how long

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:Lewis_Carroll (2016-02-13)
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  • Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Wikisource, the free online library
    of One Syllable 1905 adapted by J C Gorham Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Alice 27s Adventures in Wonderland oldid 5972379 Category Versions pages Hidden category Pages with noyearcat Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read View source View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Alice%27s_Adventures_in_Wonderland (2016-02-13)
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  • James Matthew Barrie - Wikisource, the free online library
    Peter Pan or the Boy Who Wouldn t Grow Up 1904 Walker London 1907 What Every Woman Knows 1908 When Wendy Grew Up 1908 Der Tag 1914 Half Hours 1914 Shakespeare s Legacy 1916 Dear Brutus 1917 Echoes of the War 1918 Alice Sit by the Fire 1919 Shall We Join the Ladies 1927 first act of an unfinished play Other works edit An Edinburgh Eleven 1889 A Holiday in Bed and Other Sketches 1892 A Tillyloss Scandal 1893 Two of Them 1893 An Auld Licht Manse and Other Sketches 1893 Allahakbarries C ricket C lub 1893 Scotland s Lament 1895 My Lady Nicotine 1896 Margaret Ogilvy 1896 The Allahakbarrie Book of Broadway Cricket for 1899 1899 Life in a Country Manse 1899 George Meredith 1909 Charles Frohman A Tribute 1915 Who was Sarah Findlay by Mark Twain With a Suggested Solution 1917 Courage 1922 Neil and Tintinnabulum 1925 The Greenwood Hat 1930 Works about J M Barrie edit Barrie James Matthew in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 Barrie James Matthew in A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature by John William Cousin London J M Dent Sons 1910 Some or all works by this author are in the public domain in the United States because they were published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1937 so works by this author are also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 75 years or less Works by this author may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 64001320 LCCN n50000555 ISNI 0000 0000 8077 5690 GND 11865733x SELIBR 366795 SUDOC

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:J._M._Barrie (2016-02-13)
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  • Peter and Wendy - Wikisource, the free online library
    from https en wikisource org w index php title Peter and Wendy oldid 5257934 Category Versions pages Hidden category Pages with noyearcat Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Display Options Tools What

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  • The Tales of Mother Goose/The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood - Wikisource, the free online library
    should have nothing to fear from curious people After a hundred years the son of the King then reigning who was of another family from that of the sleeping Princess was a hunting on that side of the country and he asked what those towers were which he saw in the middle of a great thick wood Every one answered according as they had heard Some said that it was an old haunted castle others that all the witches of the country held their midnight revels there but the common opinion was that it was an ogre s dwelling and that he carried to it all the little children he could catch so as to eat them up at his leisure without any one being able to follow him for he alone had the power to make his way through the wood The Prince did not know what to believe and presently a very aged countryman spake to him thus May it please your royal Highness more than fifty years since I heard from my father that there was then in this castle the most beautiful princess that was ever seen that she must sleep there a hundred years and that she should be waked by a king s son for whom she was reserved The young Prince on hearing this was all on fire He thought without weighing the matter that he could put an end to this rare adventure and pushed on by love and the desire of glory resolved at once to look into it As soon as he began to get near to the wood all the great trees the bushes and brambles gave way of themselves to let him pass through He walked up to the castle which he saw at the end of a large avenue and you can imagine he was a good deal surprised when he saw none of his people following him because the trees closed again as soon as he had passed through them However he did not cease from continuing his way a young prince in search of glory is ever valiant He came into a spacious outer court and what he saw was enough to freeze him with horror A frightful silence reigned over all the image of death was everywhere and there was nothing to be seen but what seemed to be the outstretched bodies of dead men and animals He however very well knew by the ruby faces and pimpled noses of the porters that they were only asleep and their goblets wherein still remained some drops of wine showed plainly that they had fallen asleep while drinking their wine He then crossed a court paved with marble went up the stairs and came into the guard chamber where guards were standing in their ranks with their muskets upon their shoulders and snoring with all their might He went through several rooms full of gentlemen and ladies some standing and others sitting but all were asleep He came into a gilded chamber where he saw upon a bed the curtains of which were all open the most beautiful sight ever beheld a princess who appeared to be about fifteen or sixteen years of age and whose bright and resplendent beauty had something divine in it He approached with trembling and admiration and fell down upon his knees before her Then as the end of the enchantment was come the Princess awoke and looking on him with eyes more tender than could have been expected at first sight said Is it you my Prince You have waited a long while The Prince charmed with these words and much more with the manner in which they were spoken knew not how to show his joy and gratitude he assured her that he loved her better than he did himself Their discourse was not very connected but they were the better pleased for where there is much love there is little eloquence He was more at a loss than she and we need not wonder at it she had had time to think of what to say to him for it is evident though history says nothing of it that the good fairy during so long a sleep had given her very pleasant dreams In short they talked together for four hours and then they said not half they had to say In the meanwhile all the palace had woke up with the Princess every one thought upon his own business and as they were not in love they were ready to die of hunger The lady of honor being as sharp set as the other folks grew very impatient and told the Princess aloud that the meal was served The Prince helped the Princess to rise She was entirely and very magnificently dressed but his royal Highness took care not to tell her that she was dressed like his greatgrandmother and had a high collar She looked not a bit the less charming and beautiful for all that They went into the great mirrored hall where they supped and were served by the officers of the Princess s household The violins and haut boys played old tunes but they were excellent though they had not been played for a hundred years and after supper without losing any time the lord almoner married them in the chapel of the castle They had but very little sleep the Princess scarcely needed any and the Prince left her next morning to return into the city where his father was greatly troubled about him The Prince told him that he lost his way in the forest as he was hunting and that he had slept in the cottage of a charcoal burner who gave him cheese and brown bread The King his father who was a good man believed him but his mother could not be persuaded that it was true and seeing that he went almost every day a hunting and

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Tales_of_Mother_Goose/The_Sleeping_Beauty_in_the_Wood (2016-02-13)
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  • The Jungle Book - Wikisource, the free online library
    from the original MacMillan edition of The Jungle Book 1894 Table of Contents edit NB Each even numbered item is a poem related to the preceding story Mowgli s Brothers Hunting Song of the Seeonee Pack Kaa s Hunting Road Song of the Bandar Log Tiger Tiger Mowgli s Song The White Seal Lukannon Rikki Tikki Tavi Darzee s Chant Toomai of the Elephants Shiv and the Grasshopper Her Majesty s Servants Parade Song of the Camp Animals This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1936 so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 75 years or less This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title The Jungle Book oldid 5622975 Categories 1894 works PD old 75 1923 Novels Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Jungle_Book (2016-02-13)
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  • Charles Dickens - Wikisource, the free online library
    Awake A Message from the Sea A Monument of French Folly Mr Robert Bolton The Gentleman Connected with the Press Mrs Lirriper s Legacy Mrs Lirriper s Lodgings Mugby Junction The Noble Savage Nobody s Story On Duty with Inspector Field Our Bore Our English Watering Place Our French Watering Place Our Honourable Friend Our School Our Vestry Out of the Season Out of Town The Pantomime of Life The Perils of Certain English Prisoners Plated Article A Poor Man s Tale of a Patent The Poor Relation s Story Prince Bull Public Life of Mr Tulrumble Once Mayor of Mudfog The Schoolboy s Story The Seven Poor Travellers The Signal Man Sketches of Young Couples Sketches of Young Gentlemen Some Particulars Concerning a Lion Somebody s Luggage Sunday Under Three Heads Thoughts about People Three Detective Anecdotes To Be Read at Dusk Tom Tiddler s Ground The Trial for Murder A Walk in a Workhouse What Christmas Is as We Grow Older The Wreck of the Golden Mary Essays edit In Memoriam W M Thackeray Articles edit A Coal Miner s Evidence Adelaide Anne Procter from The Atlantic Monthly December 1865 1 2 About edit Charles Dickens in The Times 1870 Dickens Charles by William Minto in Encyclopædia Britannica 9th ed 1878 Dickens Charles by Rossiter Johnson in The American Cyclopædia 1879 Dickens Charles in Dictionary of National Biography London Smith Elder Co 1885 1900 in 63 vols Dickens Charles The New International Encyclopædia New York Dodd Mead and Co 1905 Charles Dickens 1906 by Gilbert Keith Chesterton Dickens Charles in The Nuttall Encyclopædia by James Wood London Frederick Warne and Co Ltd 1907 Dickens Charles in A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature by John William Cousin London J M Dent Sons 1910 Dickens Charles John Huffam by Thomas Seccombe in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 Dickens Charles in The New Student s Reference Work Chicago F E Compton and Co 1914 Dickens Charles by William T Brewster in The Encyclopedia Americana New York The Encyclopedia Americana Corporation 1920 Dickens Charles in Collier s New Encyclopedia New York P F Collier Son Co On his works edit Appreciations and Criticisms of the Works of Charles Dickens 1911 by Gilbert Keith Chesterton David Copperfield by Wilbur L Cross in The Encyclopedia Americana New York The Encyclopedia Americana Corporation 1920 Great Expectations by William T Brewster in The Encyclopedia Americana New York The Encyclopedia Americana Corporation 1920 Review of The Old Curiosity Shop by Edgar Allan Poe Old Curiosity Shop in The New Student s Reference Work Chicago F E Compton and Co 1914 Old Curiosity Shop in The Encyclopedia Americana New York The Encyclopedia Americana Corporation 1920 Oliver Twist in The New Student s Reference Work Chicago F E Compton and Co 1914 Oliver Twist by William T Brewster in The Encyclopedia Americana New York The Encyclopedia Americana Corporation 1920 Pickwick Papers by Wilbur L Cross in The Encyclopedia Americana New York The Encyclopedia Americana Corporation 1920 Tale of

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:Charles_Dickens (2016-02-13)
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