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  • Oliver Twist - Wikisource, the free online library
    Are Introduced To The Intelligent Reader Connected With Whom Various Pleasant Matters Are Related Appertaining To This History Chapter 14 Comprising Further Particulars Of Oliver s Stay At Mr Brownlow s With The Remarkable Prediction Which One Mr Grimwig Uttered Concerning Him When He Went Out On An Errand Chapter 15 Showing How Very Fond Of Oliver Twist The Merry Old Jew And Miss Nancy Were Chapter 16 Relates What Became Of Oliver Twist After He Had Been Claimed By Nancy Chapter 17 Oliver s Destiny Continuing Unpropitious Brings A Great Man To London To Injure His Reputation Chapter 18 How Oliver Passed His Time In The Improving Society Of His Reputable Friends Chapter 19 In Which A Notable Plan Is Discussed And Determined On Chapter 20 Wherein Oliver Is Delivered Over To Mr William Sikes Chapter 21 The Expedition Chapter 22 The Burglary Chapter 23 Which Contains The Substance Of A Pleasant Conversation Between Mr Bumble And A Lady And Shows That Even A Beadle May Be Susceptible On Some Points Chapter 24 Treats On A Very Poor Subject But Is A Short One And May Be Found Of Importance In This History Chapter 25 Wherein This History Reverts To Mr Fagin And Company Chapter 26 In Which A Mysterious Character Appears Upon The Scene And Many Things Inseparable From This History Are Done And Performed Chapter 27 Atones For The Unpoliteness Of A Former Chapter Which Deserted A Lady Most Unceremoniously Chapter 28 Looks After Oliver And Proceeds With His Adventures Chapter 29 Has An Introductory Account Of The Inmates Of The House To Which Oliver Resorted Chapter 30 Relates What Oliver s New Visitors Thought Of Him Chapter 31 Involves A Critical Position Chapter 32 Of The Happy Life Oliver Began To Lead With His Kind Friends Chapter 33 Wherein The Happiness Of Oliver And His Friends Experiences A Sudden Check Chapter 34 Contains Some Introductory Particulars Relative To A Young Gentleman Who Now Arrives Upon The Scene And A New Adventure Which Happened To Oliver Chapter 35 Containing The Unsatisfactory Result Of Oliver s Adventure And A Conversation Of Some Importance Between Harry Maylie And Rose Chapter 36 Is A Very Short One And May Appear Of No Great Importance In Its Place But It Should Be Read Notwithstanding As A Sequel To The Last And A Key To One That Will Follow When Its Time Arrives Chapter 37 In Which The Reader May Perceive A Contrast Not Uncommon In Matrimonial Cases Chapter 38 Containing An Account Of What Passed Between Mr And Mrs Bumble And Mr Monks At Their Nocturnal Interview Chapter 39 Introduces Some Respectable Characters With Whom The Reader Is Already Acquainted And Shows How Monks And The Jew Laid Their Worthy Heads Together Chapter 40 A Strange Interview Which Is A Sequel To The Last Chamber Chapter 41 Containing Fresh Discoveries And Showing That Surprises Like Misfortunes Seldom Come Alone Chapter 42 An Old Acquaintance Of Oliver s Exhibiting Decided Marks Of

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Oliver_Twist (2016-02-13)
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  • Hans Christian Andersen - Wikisource, the free online library
    Mary Howitt 1847 What the Moon Saw and Other Tales Project Gutenberg Translated by H W Dulcken illustrated by A W Bayes 1866 Fairytales and Stories edit A String of Pearls 1 2 Chicken Grethe s Family 3 Clumsy Hans Croak Everything in the Right Place Great Grandfather Andersen Fairy Tales Holger Danske In a Thousand Years Ib and Little Christine Little Claus and Big Claus Little Ida s Flowers Little Tuk She was Good for Nothing Something Soup on a Sausage peg The Angel The Beetle Who Went on His Travels The Bell The Bell Deep The Blue Mountains The Bottle Neck The Buckwheat The Butterfly The Candles The Child in the Grave The Conceited Apple Branch The Court Cards The Daisy The Darning Needle The Drop of Water The Dryad The Elf of the Rose The Elfin Hill The Emperor s New Clothes The Farm Yard Cock and the Weather Cock The Fir Tree The Flax The Flying Trunk The Gardener and the Noble Family Andersen Fairy Tales The Garden of Paradise The Gate Key The Goloshes of Fortune The Great Sea Serpent The Happy Family The Jewish Maiden The Jumper The Little Elder Tree Mother The Little Match Girl The Little Mermaid The Loveliest Rose in the World The Loving Pair The Marsh King s Daughter The Metal Pig The Money Pig The Most Incredible Thing The Naughty Boy also known as The Saucy Boy The Neighbouring Families The Nightingale The Old Bachelor s Nightcap The Old Grave Stone The Old House The Old Street Lamp The Pea Blossom The Pen and the Inkstand The Princess and the Pea The Psyche The Red Shoes The Sandman also known as Ole Luk Oie The Dream God The Shadow The Shepherdess and the Chimneysweep The Shepherd s Story of the Bond of Friendship The Shirt Collar The Silver Shilling The Snow Man The Snow Queen The Steadfast Tin Soldier The Storks The Story of a Mother The Story of the Year The Sunken Convent The Swineherd The Tinder Box The Top and Ball Andersen Fairy Tales The Travelling Companion The Ugly Duckling The Wicked Prince The Wild Swans Thirty first Evening Thumbelina Under the Willow Tree What the Old Man does is Always Right What the Moon Saw Poems edit The Poet s Last Song in Littell s Living Age 127 1639 The Tallow Candle External links edit Andersen s fairy tales translated by H P Paull all in public domain Andersen s fairy tales translated by Jean Hersholt 1956 not in public domain yet Works by this author published before January 1 1923 are in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Translations or editions published later may be copyrighted Posthumous works may be copyrighted based on how long they have been published in certain countries and areas Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 4925902 LCCN n79022941 ISNI 0000 0001 2118 4353 GND 118502794 SELIBR 176031 SUDOC 026685809 BNF

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:Hans_Christian_Andersen (2016-02-13)
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  • The Little Mermaid - Wikisource, the free online library
    lille Havfrue The Little Mermaid Hans Christian Andersen English language translations of Den lille Havfrue include Paull transl The Little Mermaid 1872 Helen Stratton ill The Little Mermaid The fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen Philadelphia Lippincott 1899 W Heath Robinson ill The Little Mermaid Hans Andersen s fairy tales London Constable 1913 H L Brækstad transl Hans Tegner ill The Little Mermaid Fairy tales and stories by Hans Christian Andersen New York The Century Co 1913 William A Craigie J K Craigie transl The Little Sea Maid Fairy tales and other stories London Toronto Oxford University Press 1914 Dugald Stewart Walker ill The Mermaid Fairy Tales From Hans Christian Andersen Garden City New York Doubleday Page Co 1914 Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title The Little Mermaid oldid 6104306 Categories Spoken works Translations pages Fairy tales Works originally in Danish Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Display Options Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Little_Mermaid (2016-02-13)
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  • Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont - Wikisource, the free online library
    1923 are in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Translations or editions published later may be copyrighted Posthumous works may be copyrighted based on how long they have been published in certain countries and areas Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 31999252 LCCN n84174360 ISNI 0000 0001 2278 0077 GND 119481006 SELIBR 262522 SUDOC 026984334 BNF cb11912539z NLA 35778244 NDL 00447090 NKC mzk2003195877 PTBNP 1414523 NTA 069566283 BAV ADV10870159 NUKAT n2003022680 Project Gutenberg 31518 BNE XX972443 Freebase m 0fhxc2 English Wikisource 418383 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author Jeanne Marie Le Prince de Beaumont oldid 5665006 Categories Authors Pr 1711 births Early modern authors 1780 deaths Women authors Author PD old French authors Novelists Children s authors Hidden categories Author pages with Wikidata image Author pages with gender in Wikidata Author pages connected to Wikidata AC with 17 elements Author pages with authority control data Pages using authority control with parameters Author pages with VIAF on Wikidata Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Author Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:Jeanne-Marie_Le_Prince_de_Beaumont (2016-02-13)
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  • Beauty and the Beast (Lumsden and Son) - Wikisource, the free online library
    and still nobody came at last he was so hungry that he could stay no longer but took a chicken and ate it in two mouthfuls trembling all the while After this he drank a few glasses of wine and growing more courageous he went out of the hall and crossed through several grand apartments with magnificent furniture till he came into a chamber which had an exceeding good bed in it and as he was very much fatigued and it was past midnight he concluded it was best to shut the door and go to bed It was ten the next morning before the merchant waked and as he was going to rise he was astonished to see a good suit of clothes in the room of his own which were quite spoiled Certainly said he this palace belongs to some kind fairy who has seen and pitied my distress He looked through a window but instead of snow saw the most delightful arbours interwoven with the most beautiful flowers that ever were beheld He then returned to the great hall where he had supped the night before and found some chocolate ready made on a little table Thank you good Madam Fairy said he aloud for being so careful as to provide me a breakfast I am extremely obliged to you for all your favours The good man drank his chocolate and then went to look for his horse but passing through an arbour of roses he remembered Beauty s request to him and gathered a branch on which were several immediately he heard a great noise and saw such a frightful beast coming towards him that he was ready to faint away You are very ungrateful said the beast to him in a terrible voice I have saved your life by receiving you into my castle and in return you steal my roses which I value beyond any thing in the universe but you shall die for it I give you but a quarter of an hour to prepare yourself to say your prayers The merchant fell on his knees and lifted up both his hands My Lord said he I beseech you to forgive me indeed I had no intention to offend in gathering a rose for one of my daughters who desired me to bring her one My name is not My Lord replied the monster but Beast I don t love compliments not I I like people should speak as they think and so do not imagine I am to be moved by any of your flattering speeches but you say you have got daughters I will forgive you on condition that one of them come willingly and suffer for you Let me have no words but go about your business and swear that if your daughter refuse to die in your stead you will return within three months The merchant had no mind to sacrifice his daughters to the ugly monster but he thought in obtaining this respite he should have the satisfaction of seeing them once more so he promised upon oath he would return and the Beast told him he might set out when he pleased but added he you shall not depart empty handed go back to the room where you lay and you will see a great empty chest fill it with whatever you like best and I will send it to your home and at the same time Beast withdrew Well said the good man to himself if I must die I shall have the comfort at least of leaving something to my poor children He returned to the bed chamber and finding a great quantity of broad pieces of gold he filled the great chest the Beast had mentioned locked it and afterwards took his horse out of the stable leaving the palace with as much grief as he had entered it with joy The horse of his own accord took one of the roads of the forest and in a few hours the good man was at home His children came around him but instead of receiving their embraces with pleasure he looked on them and holding up the branch he had in his hands he burst into tears Here Beauty said he take these roses but little do you think how dear they are like to cost your unhappy father and then related his fatal adventure immediately the two eldest set up lamentable outcries and said all manner of ill natured things to Beauty who did not cry at all Do but see the pride of that little wretch said they she would not ask for fine clothes as we did but no truly Miss wanted to distinguish herself so now she will be the death of our poor father and yet she does not so much as shed a tear Why should I answered Beauty it would be very needless for my father shall not suffer upon my account since the monster will accept of one of his daughters I will deliver myself up to all his fury and I am very happy in thinking that my death will save my father s life and be a proof of my tender love for him No sister said her three brothers that shall not be we will go find the monster and either kill him or perish in the attempt Do not imagine any such thing my sons said the merchant Beast s power is so great that I have no hopes of your overcoming him I am charmed with Beauty s kind and generous offer but I cannot yield to it I am old and have not long to live so can only lose a few years which I regret for your sakes alone my dear children Indeed father said Beauty you shall not go to the palace without me you cannot hinder me from following you It was to no purpose all they could say Beauty still insisted on setting out for the fine palace and her sisters were delighted at it for her virtue and amiable qualities made them envious and jealous Illustration Beauty Delivered up to the Beast The merchant was so afflicted at the thoughts of losing his daughter that he had quite forgot the chest full of gold but at night when he retired to rest no sooner had he shut his chamber door than to his great astonishment he found it by his bedside he was determined however not to tell his children that he was grown rich because they would have wanted to return to town and he was resolved not to leave the country but he trusted Beauty with the secret who informed him that two gentlemen came in his absence and courted her sisters she begged her father to consent to their marriage and give them fortunes for she was so good that she loved them and forgave them heartily all their ill usage These wicked creatures rubbed their eyes with an onion to force some tears when they parted with their sister but her brothers were really concerned Beauty was the only one who did not shed tears at parting because she would not increase their uneasiness The horse took the direct road to the palace and towards evening they perceived it illuminated as at first the horse went of himself into the stable and the good man and his daughter came into the great hall where they found a table splendidly served up and two covers The merchant had no heart to eat but Beauty endeavoured to appear cheerful sat down to table and helped him Afterwards thought she to herself Beast surely has a mind to fatten me before he eats me since he provides such a plentiful entertainment When they had supped they heard a great noise and the merchant all in tears bid his poor child farewell for he thought Beast was coming Beauty was sadly terrified at his horrid form but she took courage as well as she could and the monster having asked her if she came willingly y e s said she trembling You are very good and I am greatly obliged to you honest man go your ways tomorrow morning but never think of returning here again Farewell Beauty Farewell Beast answered she and immediately the monster withdrew Oh daughter said the merchant embracing Beauty I am almost frightened to death believe me you had better go back and let me stay here No father said Beauty in a resolute tone you shall set out tomorrow morning and leave me to the care and protection of Providence They went to bed and thought they should not close their eyes all night but scarce were they laid down than they fell fast asleep and Beauty dreamed a fine lady came and said to her I am content Beauty with your good will this good action of yours in giving up your own life to save your father s shall not go unrewarded Beauty waked and told her father her dream and though it helped to comfort him a little yet he could not help crying bitterly when he took leave of his dear child As soon as he was gone Beauty sat down in the great hall and fell a crying likewise but as she was mistress of a great deal of resolution she recommended herself to God and resolved not to be uneasy the little time she had to live for she firmly believed Beast would eat her up that night However she thought she might as well walk about till then and view this fine castle which she could not help admiring it was a delightful pleasant place and she was extremely surprised at seeing a door over which was wrote BEAUTY S APARTMENT She opened it hastily and was quite dazzled with the magnificence that reigned throughout but what chiefly took up her attention was a large library a harpsichord and several music books Well said she to herself I see they will not let my time hang heavy on my hands for want of amusement Then she reflected Were I but to stay here a day there would not have been all these preparations This consideration inspired her with fresh courage and opening the library she took a book and read these words in letters of gold Welcome Beauty banish fear You are queen and mistress here Speak your wishes speak your will Swift obedience meets them still Alas said she with a sigh there is nothing I desire so much as to see my poor father and to know what he is doing She had no sooner said this when casting her eyes on a great looking glass to her great amazement she saw her own home where her father arrived with a very dejected countenance her sisters went to meet him and notwithstanding their endeavours to appear sorrowful their joy felt for having got rid of their sister was visible in every feature a moment after every thing disappeared and Beauty s apprehensions at this proof of Beast s complaisance Illustration Beauty Looking in the Glass At noon she found dinner ready and while at table was entertained with an excellent concert of music though without seeing any body but at night as she was going to sit down to supper she heard the noise Beast made and could not help being sadly terrified Beauty said the monster will you give me leave to see you sup That is as you please answered Beauty trembling No replied the Beast you alone are mistress here you need only bid me be gone if my presence is troublesome and I will immediately withdraw but tell me do not you think me very ugly That is true said Beauty for I cannot tell a lie but I believe you are very good natured So I am said the monster but then besides my ugliness I have no sense I know very well that I am a poor silly stupid creature Tis no sign of folly to think so replied Beauty for never did fool know this or had so humble a conceit of his own understanding Eat then Beauty said the monster and endeavour to amuse yourself in your palace for every thing here is yours and I should be very uneasy if you were not happy You are very obliging answered Beauty I own I am pleased with your kindness and when I consider that your deformity scarce appears Yes yes said the Beast my heart is good but still I am a monster Among mankind says Beauty there are many that deserve that name more than you and I prefer you just as your are to those who under a human form hide a treacherous corrupt and ungrateful heart If I had sense enough replied the Beast I would make a fine compliment to thank you but I am so dull that I can only say I am greatly obliged to you Beauty ate a hearty supper and had almost conquered her dread of the monster but she had liked to have fainted away when he said to her Beauty will you be my wife She was some time before she durst answer for she was afraid of making him angry if she refused At last however she said trembling No Beast Immediately the poor monster began to sigh and hissed so frightfully that the whole palace echoed But Beauty soon recovered her fright for Beast having said in a mournful voice then farewell Beauty left the room and only turned back now and then to look at her as he went out When Beauty was alone she felt a great deal of compassion for poor Beast Alas said she tis a thousand pities any thing so good natured should be so ugly Beauty spent three months very contentedly in the palace every evening Beast paid her a visit and talked to her during supper very rationally with plain good common sense but never with what the world calls wit and Beauty daily discovered some valuable qualifications in the monster and seeing him often had so accustomed her to his deformity that far from dreading the time of his visit she would often look on her watch to see when it would be nine for the Beast never missed coming at that hour There was but one thing that gave Beauty any concern which was that every night before she went to bed the monster always asked her if she would be his wife One day she said to him Beast you make me very uneasy I wish I could consent to marry you but I am too sincere to make you believe that will ever happen I shall always esteem you as a friend endeavour to be satisfied with this I must said the Beast for alas I know too well my own misfortune but then I love you with the tenderest affection however I ought to think myself happy that you will stay here promise me never to leave me Beauty blushed at these words she had seen in her glass that her father had pined himself sick for the loss of her and she longed to see him again I could answered she indeed promise never to leave you entirely but I have so great a desire to see my father that I shall fret to death if you refuse me that satisfaction I had rather die myself said the monster than give you the least uneasiness I will send you to your father you shall remain with him and poor Beast will die with grief No said Beauty weeping I love you too well to be the cause of your death I give you my promise to return in a week you have shewn me that my sisters are married and my brothers gone to the army only let me stay a week with my father as he is alone You shall be there tomorrow morning said the Beast but remember your promise you need only lay your ring on the table before you go to bed when you have a mind to come back farewell Beauty Beast sighed as usual bidding her good night and Beauty went to bed very sad at seeing him so afflicted When she waked the next morning she found herself at her father s and having rang a little bell that was by her bed side she saw the maid come who the moment she saw her gave a loud shriek at which the good man ran up stairs and thought he should have died with joy to see his dear daughter again He held her fast locked in his arms above a quarter of an hour As soon as the first transports were over Beauty began to think of rising and was afraid she had no clothes to put on but the maid told her that she had just found in the next room a large trunk full of gowns covered with gold and diamonds Beauty thanked good Beast for his kind care and taking one of the plainest of them she intended to make a present of the others to her sisters She scarce had said so when the trunk disappeared Her father told her that Beast insisted on her keeping them herself and immediately both gowns and trunk came back again Illustration Beauty at Supper with the Beast Beauty dressed herself and in the mean time they sent to her sisters who hasted thither with their husbands They were both of them very unhappy The eldest had married a gentleman extremely handsome indeed but so fond of his own person that he was full of nothing but his own dear self and neglected his wife The second had married

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Beauty_and_the_Beast_%28Lumsden_and_Son%29 (2016-02-13)
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  • Antoine Galland - Wikisource, the free online library
    because the author died at least 100 years ago Translations or editions published later may be copyrighted Posthumous works may be copyrighted based on how long they have been published in certain countries and areas Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 27064866 LCCN n82127356 ISNI 0000 0001 0881 4082 GND 118716220 SELIBR 187882 SUDOC 026879441 BNF cb11903946c NLA 36452179 NKC jn20000601688 PTBNP 28516 NTA 069735247 BAV ADV10214032 NUKAT n00031134 Project Gutenberg 31901 BNE XX936346 Open Library OL688614A Freebase m 02z 2s English Wikisource 690462 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author Antoine Galland oldid 5657001 Categories Authors Ga 1646 births Early modern authors 1715 deaths Male authors Author PD old Hidden categories Author pages with Wikidata image Author pages with gender in Wikidata Author pages connected to Wikidata AC with 17 elements Author pages with authority control data Pages using authority control with parameters Author pages with VIAF on Wikidata Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Author Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:Antoine_Galland (2016-02-13)
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  • William Shakespeare - Wikisource, the free online library
    Denmark 1599 The Tragedy of Julius Caesar 1599 The Tragedy of Julius Caesar 1919 Yale s edition The Tragedy of King Lear 1605 The Tragedy of Macbeth 1606 First Folio edition The Tragedy of Othello The Moor of Venice 1604 The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet 1591 The Tragedy of Titus Andronicus 1592 authorship disputed The Two Noble Kinsmen c 1613 1614 co authored with John Fletcher Histories edit The Raigne of King Edward the Third Published 1597 Commonly attributed partly to Shakespeare partly to Thomas Kyd The Life and Death of King John 1596 The Tragedy of King Richard the Second 1597 The Tragedy of Richard the Third With the Landing of Earl Richmond and the Battle at Bosworth Field 1593 The First Part of King Henry the Fourth 1597 The Second Part of King Henry the Fourth 1597 The Life of Henry the Fifth 1599 The First Part of King Henry the Sixth 1592 The Second Part of King Henry the Sixth 1593 The Third Part of King Henry the Sixth 1595 The Life of King Henry the Eighth 1613 authorship disputed Poems edit Amiens Song Ariel s Song Dawn Song Dirge of Love Fancy Fidele s Dirge Ingratitude A Lover and His Lass A Lover s Complaint 1609 authorship disputed Love s Perjuries Lullaby A Madrigal O Mistress Mine Ophelia s Song The Passionate Pilgrim 1599 The Phoenix and the Turtle 1601 The Rape of Lucrece 1594 A Sea Dirge Silvia The Sonnets 1609 Sonnets to Sundry Notes of Music 1599 only one is unquestionably Shakespeare s Spring Take O Take The Rugged Pyrrhus Under the Greenwood Tree Venus and Adonis 1593 Where the Bee Sucks Winter Other edit Shakespeare s last will and testament Lost and disputed works edit Plays edit Cardenio lost Edward III attributed The Book of Sir Thomas More attributed Love s Labour s Wonne lost or given a different title Poems edit Shall I die attributed To the Queen by the players attributed Epitaph on Elias James attributed Epitaphs on John Combe attributed Collections edit First Folio prepared by John Heminges and Henry Condell in 1623 Works about Shakespeare and his works edit Hamlet and His Problems by T S Eliot Characters of Shakespeare s Plays by William Hazlitt Shakespeare in the Class Room by Theodore Dwight Weld 1886 Shakespeare William in Dictionary of National Biography London Smith Elder Co 1885 1900 in 63 vols Hero Shakespeare The New International Encyclopædia New York Dodd Mead and Co 1905 Shakespeare William in A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature by John William Cousin London J M Dent Sons 1910 Shakespeare William in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 The Religion of Shakespeare in Catholic Encyclopedia 1913 Midsummer Night s Dream The New International Encyclopædia New York Dodd Mead and Co 1905 Midsummer Night s Dream A in The Encyclopedia Americana New York The Encyclopedia Americana Corporation 1920 Tales from Shakespeare by Charles and Mary Lamb Shakespeare in General William Booth enters into Heaven and

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:William_Shakespeare (2016-02-13)
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  • Hamlet - Wikisource, the free online library
    in Characters of Shakespeare s Plays Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Hamlet oldid 3204572 Category Mainspace disambiguation pages Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Display Options Tools

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Hamlet (2016-02-13)
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