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  • The Hare and the Tortoise (Aesop) - Wikisource, the free online library
    fell fast asleep At last waking up and moving as fast as he could he saw the Tortoise had reached the goal and was comfortably dozing after her fatigue Slow but steady wins the race Jacobs translation 1894 edit The Hare and the Tortoise The Hare was once boasting of his speed before the other animals I have never yet been beaten said he when I put forth my full speed I challenge any one here to race with me The Tortoise said quietly I accept your challenge That is a good joke said the Hare I could dance round you all the way Keep your boasting till you ve beaten answered the Tortoise Shall we race So a course was fixed and a start was made The Hare darted almost out of sight at once but soon stopped and to show his contempt for the Tortoise lay down to have a nap The Tortoise plodded on and plodded on and when the Hare awoke from his nap he saw the Tortoise just near the winning post and could not run up in time to save the race Then said the Tortoise Plodding wins the race Retrieved from https en

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Hare_and_the_Tortoise_%28Aesop%29 (2016-02-13)
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  • The Valiant Little Tailor - Wikisource, the free online library
    Anning Bell illus 1912 Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title The Valiant Little Tailor oldid 5811741 Categories Versions pages Fairy tales Hidden category Pages with noyearcat Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Valiant_Little_Tailor (2016-02-13)
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  • Ellis Parker Butler - Wikisource, the free online library
    Water goats and other troubles Some or all works by this author are in the public domain in the United States because they were published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1937 so works by this author are also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 75 years or less Works by this author may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 29892220 LCCN n81040602 ISNI 0000 0000 7368 8986 GND 1029039232 SUDOC 110846516 NLA 35024308 Project Gutenberg 585 Open Library OL993246A IMDB nm0124909 Freebase m 02d7p3 English Wikisource 114709 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author Ellis Parker Butler oldid 5653461 Categories Authors Bu 1869 births Early modern authors 1937 deaths Modern authors Male authors Author PD old 75 1923 United States authors Novelists Early modern poets Modern poets Pulp writers Short story authors Humour authors Essayists Hidden categories Author pages without image Author pages with gender in Wikidata Author pages connected to

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:Ellis_Parker_Butler (2016-02-13)
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  • Pigs Is Pigs - Wikisource, the free online library
    me to call in the pig docther an have their pulses took Wan thing I do know howiver which is they ve glorious appytites for pigs of their soize Ate They d ate the brass padlocks off of a barn door I If the paddy pig by the same token ate as hearty as these dago pigs do there d be a famine in Ireland To assure himself that his report would be up to date Flannery went to the rear of the office and looked into the cage The pigs had been transferred to a larger box a dry goods box Wan two t ree four five six sivin eight he counted Sivin spotted an wan all black All well an hearty an all eatin loike ragin hippypottymusses He went back to his desk and wrote Mr Morgan Head of Tariff Department he wrote Why do I say dago pigs is pigs because they is pigs and will be til you say they ain t which is what the rule book says stop your jollying me you know it as well as I do As to health they are all well and hoping you are the same P S There are eight now the family increased all good eaters P S I paid out so far two dollars for cabbage which they like shall I put in bill for same what Morgan head of the Tariff Department when he received this letter laughed He read it again and became serious By George he said Flannery is right pigs is pigs I ll have to get authority on this thing Meanwhile Miss Kane take this letter Agent Westcote N J Regarding shipment guinea pigs File No A6754 Rule 83 Gen eral Instruction to Agents clearly states that agents shall collect from consignee all costs of provender etc etc required for live stock while in transit or storage You will proceed to collect same from consignee Flannery received this letter next morning and when he read it he grinned Proceed to collect he said softly How thim clerks do loike to be talkin Me proceed to col lect two dollars and twinty foive cints off Misther Morehouse I wonder do thim clerks know Misther Morehouse I ll git it Oh yes Misther Morehouse two an a quarter plaze Cert nly me dear frind Flannery Delighted Not Flannery drove the express wagon to Mr Morehouse s door Mr Morehouse answered the bell Ah ha he cried as soon as he saw it was Flannery So you ve come to your senses at last have you I thought you would Bring the box in I hev no box said Flannery coldly I hev a bill agin Misther John C Morehouse for two dollars and twinty foive cints for kebbages aten by his dago pigs Wud you wish to pay ut Pay Cabbages gasped Mr Morehouse Do you mean to say that two little guinea pigs Eight said Flannery Papa an mamma an the six childer Eight For answer Mr Morehouse slammed the door in Flannery s face Flannery looked at the door reproachfully I take ut the con sign y don t want to pay for thim kebbages he said If I know signs of refusal the con sign y refuses to pay for wan dang kebbage leaf an be hanged to me Mr Morgan the head of the Tariff Department consulted the president of the Interurban Express Company regarding guinea pigs as to whether they were pigs or not pigs The president was inclined to treat the matter lightly What is the rate on pigs and on pets he asked Pigs thirty cents pets twenty five said Morgan Then of course guinea pigs are pigs said the president Yes agreed Morgan I look at it that way too A thing that can come under two rates is naturally due to be classed as the higher But are guinea pigs pigs Aren t they rabbits Come to think of it said the president I believe they are more like rabbits Sort of half way station between pig and rabbit I think the question is this are guinea pigs of the domestic pig family I ll ask professor Gordon He is authority on such things Leave the papers with me The president put the papers on his desk and wrote a letter to Professor Gordon Unfortunately the Professor was in South America collecting zoological specimens and the letter was forwarded to him by his wife As the Professor was in the highest Andes where no white man had ever penetrated the letter was many months in reaching him The president forgot the guinea pigs Morgan forgot them Mr Morehouse forgot them but Flannery did not One half of his time he gave to the duties of his agency the other half was devoted to the guinea pigs Long before Professor Gordon received the president s letter Morgan received one from Flannery About them dago pigs it said what shall I do they are great in family life no race suicide for them there are thirty two now shall I sell them do you take this express office for a menagerie answer quick Morgan reached for a telegraph blank and wrote Agent Westcote Don t sell pigs He then wrote Flannery a letter calling his attention to the fact that the pigs were not the property of the company but were merely being held during a settlement of a dispute regarding rates He advised Flannery to take the best possible care of them Flannery letter in hand looked at the pigs and sighed The dry goods box cage had become too small He boarded up twenty feet of the rear of the express office to make a large and airy home for them and went about his business He worked with feverish intensity when out on his rounds for the pigs required attention and took most of his time Some months later in desperation he

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Pigs_Is_Pigs (2016-02-13)
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  • The Prince and the Pauper - Wikisource, the free online library
    toils Chapter 11 At Guildhall Chapter 12 The Prince and his deliverer Chapter 13 The disappearance of the Prince Chapter 14 Le Roi est mort vive le Roi Chapter 15 Tom as King Chapter 16 The state dinner Chapter 17 Foo foo the First Chapter 18 The Prince with the tramps Chapter 19 The Prince with the peasants Chapter 20 The Prince and the hermit Chapter 21 Hendon to the rescue Chapter 22 A victim of treachery Chapter 23 The Prince a prisoner Chapter 24 The escape Chapter 25 Hendon Hall Chapter 26 Disowned Chapter 27 In prison Chapter 28 The sacrifice Chapter 29 To London Chapter 30 Tom s progress Chapter 31 The Recognition procession Chapter 32 Coronation Day Chapter 33 Edward as King Conclusion Justice and Retribution Notes Images This work was published before January 1 1923 and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title The Prince and the Pauper oldid 4742694 Categories 1882 works PD old Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Prince_and_the_Pauper (2016-02-13)
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  • The Little Match Girl - Wikisource, the free online library
    Girl 1872 Helen Stratton ill The Little Match Girl The fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen Philadelphia Lippincott 1899 H L Brækstad transl Hans Tegner ill The Little Match Girl Fairy tales and stories by Hans Christian Andersen New York The Century Co 1913 Sorry your browser either has JavaScript disabled or does not have any supported player You can download the clip or download a player to play the clip in your browser Listen to this text help file info or download Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title The Little Match Girl oldid 6104307 Categories Versions pages Spoken works Fairy tales Modern works Works originally in Danish Hidden category Pages with noyearcat Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Display Options Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Cite this page Download print Create a book Download as PDF Printable version In other languages Català Čeština Dansk Esperanto Suomi Français Italiano Polski Português

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Little_Match_Girl (2016-02-13)
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  • Disney - Wikisource, the free online library
    Reagan Ronald Reagan honoring the memory of Walt Disney on the 85th anniversary of his birth 1986 Summary By clicking the Save page button you are agreeing to the Terms of Use the Privacy Policy and you irrevocably agree to release your contribution under the CC BY SA 3 0 License and the GFDL You agree that a hyperlink or URL is sufficient attribution under the Creative Commons license Cancel

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/w/index.php?title=Portal:Disney&action=edit§ion=6 (2016-02-13)
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  • Proclamation 4725 - Wikisource, the free online library
    a joint resolution of February 13 1980 has requested the President to issue a proclamation honoring the memory of Walt Disney for his contribution to the American dream Now THEREFORE I JIMMY CARTER President of the United States of America do hereby call upon the people of this Nation to recall the accomplishments of Walt Disney and to honor his memory on February 19 1980 IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of February in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourth JIMMY CARTER Filed with the Office of the Federal Register 10 41 a m February 20 1980 This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government see 17 U S C 105 Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Proclamation 4725 oldid 3762451 Category PD USGov Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Proclamation_4725 (2016-02-13)
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