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  • Richard Fitzscrob (DNB00) - Wikisource, the free online library
    the time of Domesday and his lands were held by his son Osbern Osbern FitzRichard fl 1088 had held lands in Shropshire Herefordshire and Worcestershire in the time of King Edward In Domesday he appears as one of the few tenants in chief in the first named county he then also held lands in Bedfordshire and Warwickshire He took part with Earl Roger of Shrews bury s men in the rebellion of 1088 and was one of the leaders of the force which threatened Worcester and was repulsed by the curse of Bishop Wulstan Ord Vit iii 270 He gave Boraston in Burford Shropshire to the church of Worcester Freeman seems to be mistaken in identifying Osbern FitzRichard with Osbern Pentecost Osbern s wife was perhaps Nest daughter of Gruffydd ap Llewelyn Her daughter married Bernard fl 1093 q v of Neufmarché and a son Hugh FitzOsbern who married Eustachia de Say died before 1140 Hugh had two sons Osbern who died about 1185 and Hugh de Say who was ancestor of the Talbots of Richard s Castle and of the Cornwalls of Burford It has been conjectured that the great northern family of Scrope was descended from Richard FitzScrob Richard is called Ricardus Scrupe in the Herefordshire Domesday p 186 and his son Osbern is once called Osbern filius Escrob Hemming Cartulary i 78 In an early charter of Hugh FitzOsbern there is mention of a Richard de Escrop In 1163 Pipe Roll 5 Henry II a Robert de Scrupa held two knights fees in Gloucestershire The Gloucestershire name is also spelt Escropes and Escrupes and eventually appears as Croupes the various forms are sufficiently close to suggest a connection between Scrob and Scrope The Yorkshire family appears to be derived from a Robert Scrope of Lincolnshire in the

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  • Robert d'Oilgi (DNB00) - Wikisource, the free online library
    Abbey providing both for them and for the monks There is no good evidence that the castle and priory of Wallingford were erected by him Robert d Oilgi died in September probably in 1090 he and his wife were buried on the north side of the high altar at Abingdon The great fee of Oilly which included about twenty eight manors in Oxfordshire passed to his brother Nigel whose name occurs frequently in Oxfordshire and Berkshire charters till about 1119 By his wife Agnes Nigel had two sons Robert and Fulk the former of whom Robert d Oilgi II fl 1130 1142 was constabularius regis Henrici primi and became civitatis Oxnefordiæ sub rege præceptor Gesta Stephani p 74 Ann Mon iv 19 In the war between Stephen and Matilda Robert who is called in the Gesta Stephani vir mollis et deliciis magis quam animi fortitudine affluens took the side of the empress He went to her at Reading in 1141 and invited her to Oxford Castle where she was besieged by Stephen October December 1142 and eventually obliged to escape on the ice to Wallingford The Oseney chronicler states definitely although the statement is difficult to reconcile with mention of him in an assumably later charter at Oseney Mon Angl vi 251 No iv that Robert d Oilgi II died fifteen days before this siege and was buried at Eynsham Ann Mon iv 24 Kennet Par Ant i 155 8 infers from certain payments to the sheriffs of Oxfordshire in 1155 and 1157 that Robert died about 1156 Robert received in marriage the king s mistress Edith daughter of Forne lord of Greystock with Steeple Claydon in Buckinghamshire as her dower He left two sons Henry d Oilgi I d 1163 and Gilbert The barony on the death of Henry d Oilgi II passed to the family of his sister Margaret the wife of Henry Newburgh earl of Warwick Robert and his wife Edith with Robert her son by King Henry are remarkable for their munificence to religious bodies such as the Templars of Cowley near Oxford 1143 the Cistercians of Oddington or Thame c 1138 and the abbeys of Eynsham Gloucester and Godstow Their most important work was the foundation of Oseney Abbey for Austin canons on a branch of the Thames near Oxford at a spot where Edith had noticed the noise of chattering pyes explained by her confessor Ranulph a canon of St Frideswide s as the complaints of souls in purgatory The original endowment in 1129 included the tithes of six manors and other estates and was largely augmented in 1149 by the annexation of St George in the Castle with its increased property and by many other lands in the fee of Oilly St George s was afterwards used by the abbey for the accommodation of their students at the university and Henry V at one time intended to turn it into a large college Wiggod the second prior and first abbot of Oseney 1138

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  • Robert the Staller (DNB00) - Wikisource, the free online library
    palatii stabilitor et ejusdem Regis propinquus standing by the deathbed of Edward Mr Freeman queried the propinquus but apparently without cause Another of these charters mentions Robert s name in a way that implies he was sheriff of Essex In addition to his other estates Edward granted him the prebend of an outlawed canon of Shrewsbury which he presented to his son in law Domesday i 252 b On William s landing in England Robert who is described as a native of Normandy but residing in England sent to William domino suo et consanguineo says William of Poitiers warning that Harold was marching south flushed with victory and that he had better await him behind entrenchments Norman Conquest iii 415 18 The rest of our knowledge of him comes from Domesday which shows us that he was sheriff of Essex under William Domesday ii 98 but dead before the survey 1086 Freeman in his appendix on Robert and Swegen of Essex Norman Conquest vol iv has analysed the entries relating to each in Domesday and shown that Robert while losing some of the estates he had held before the Conquest obtained fresh ones especially in Essex Swegen his son and heir succeeded him as sheriff but lost the appointment before the survey Domesday ii 2 b He raised a castle at Rayleigh of which the earthworks remain and made a vineyard and a park there ib p 43 b His son and successor Robert known like him as De Essex was father of Henry de Essex the constable who forfeited the family estates for treason in 1163 They then vested in the crown as the honour of Rayleigh Vita Eadwardi Rolls Ser William of Poitiers Domesday Book Kemble s Codex Diplomaticus Freeman s Norman Conquest J H R Retrieved from

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  • Urse d'Abetot (DNB00) - Wikisource, the free online library
    royal charters and the charter of Henry I for holding the local courts issued between 1108 and 1112 is addressed to him as sheriff of Worcestershire Select Charters p 99 He was succeeded in this reign by his son Roger who offended Henry I by slaying one of his officers Will Malm ut supra There can be little doubt though the fact has escaped notice that this was the Roger Vicecomes de Wirecestria to whom is addressed a writ of Henry I Hale p 30 a and the Roger de Worcester whose lands were granted by Henry I to Walter de Beauchamp in a charter entered in the Warwick cartulary With him Urse s male issue seems to have become extinct though members of the house of Abetot continued in the county Liber Rubeus p 266 giving name to Croome d Abitot and Redmarley d Abitot The Evesham Chronicle speaks of them as Ursini Freeman speaks at the battle of Lincoln of Richard the son of Urse a descendant it would seem of the old enemy Urse of Abetott whose exploits that day might be taken as some atonement for the crimes of his kindred Norm Conq v 300 But there seems to have been no connection between the two Walter de Beauchamp who married Urse s daughter Emmeline Dugdale obtained from Henry I a confirmation of the lands given him by Adelisa Urse s widow together with the shrievalty of Worcestershire and the office of constable These grants which are recorded in the Warwick cartulary founded the greatness of the Beauchamps whose descendants it is said preserved the memory of Urse in the well known bear cognisance of the earls of Warwick It is well ascertained that Robert the Despencer another tenant in chief was brother to Urse Heming

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  • Domesday survey - Wikisource, the free online library
    button you are agreeing to the Terms of Use the Privacy Policy and you irrevocably agree to release your contribution under the CC BY SA 3 0 License and the GFDL You agree that a hyperlink or URL is sufficient attribution under the Creative Commons license Cancel Editing help opens in new window This page is a member of 1 hidden category Category Portals needing review Retrieved from https en

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  • Riviere, Robert (DNB00) - Wikisource, the free online library
    in a small way employing only one man But not finding sufficient scope for his talents in that city he came in 1840 to London where he commenced business as a bookbinder at 28 Great Queen Street Lincoln s Inn Fields afterwards removing to 196 Piccadilly The excellent workmanship and good taste displayed in his bindings gradually won for them the appreciation of connoisseurs and he was largely employed by the Duke of Devonshire Mr Christie Miller Captain Brooke and other great collectors He also bound for the queen and the royal family In the Great Exhibition of 1851 he exhibited several examples of his skill and he obtained a medal He was chosen by the council to bind one thousand copies of the large Illustrated Catalogue intended for presentation to all the crowned heads in Europe and other distinguished persons It is said that two thousand skins of the best red morocco as well as fifteen hundred yards of silk for the linings of the covers were used by Riviere for this undertaking He also restored and bound the famous Domesday Book now preserved in the Record Office an excellent piece of work While the binding of Riviere like that of his equally celebrated fellow craftsman Francis Bedford is deficient in originality it is in all other respects in the quality of the materials the forwarding and in the finish and delicacy of the tooling deserving of almost unqualified commendation Taking into consideration the fact that he was entirely self taught his bindings are wonderful specimens of artistic taste skill and perseverance He died at his residence 47 Gloucester Road Regent s Park on 12 April 1882 and was buried in the churchyard at East End Finchley Riviere married in 1830 Eliza Sarah Pegler by whom he had two

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  • Domesday survey - Wikisource, the free online library
    3Atexts Author Frederic William Maitland Maitland Frederic William Domesday book and beyond three essays in the early history of England Cambridge University Press Boston Little Brown Co 1897 xiii 527 p http www archive org search php query Domesday 20book 20beyond 20AND 20mediatype 3Atexts http www dominiopublico gov br download texto mc000185 pdf text 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Domesday Book Ballard Adolphus The domesday boroughs 1904 http www archive org search php query domesday 20boroughs 20ballard 20AND 20mediatype 3Atexts Author Adolphus Ballard Ballard Adolphus The Domesday inquest 2nd ed London Methuen Co 1923 xvi 289 p front facsim 27 illus 18 pl 2 maps plan 23 cm http books google com au books id Gh8sAAAAIAAJ 1906 edition http www archive org search php query ballard 20Domesday 20inquest 20AND 20mediatype 3Atexts archive org 942 03 P822f Author Austin Lane Poole Poole Austin Lane From Domesday Book to Magna Carta 1087 1216 Series The Oxford history of England v 3 Oxford Clarendon Press 1951 2nd ed 1955 xv 541 p geneal tables maps 22 cm Summary By clicking the Save page button you are agreeing to the Terms of Use the Privacy Policy and you irrevocably agree to release your contribution under the

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  • 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Domesday Book - Wikisource, the free online library
    were disposed to evade the liabilities of their English predecessors The Domesday survey therefore recorded the names of the new holders of lands and the assessments on which their tax was to be paid But it did more than this by the king s instructions it endeavoured to make a national valuation list estimating the annual value of all the land in the country 1 at the time of King Edward s death 2 when the new owners received it 3 at the time of the survey and further it reckoned by command the potential value as well It is evident that William desired to know the financial resources of his kingdom and probable that he wished to compare them with the existing assessment which was one of considerable antiquity though there are traces that it had been occasionally modified The great bulk of Domesday Book is devoted to the somewhat arid details of the assessment and valuation of rural estates which were as yet the only important source of national wealth After stating the assessment of the manor the record sets forth the amount of arable land and the number of plough teams each reckoned at eight oxen available for working it with the additional number if any that might be employed then the river meadows woodland pasture fisheries i e weirs in the streams water mills saltpans if by the sea and other subsidiary sources of revenue the peasants are enumerated in their several classes and finally the annual value of the whole past and present is roughly estimated It is obvious that both in its values and in its measurements the survey s reckoning is very crude Apart from the wholly rural portions which constitute its bulk Domesday contains entries of interest concerning most of the towns which were probably made because of their bearing on the fiscal rights of the crown therein These include fragments of custumals records of the military service due of markets mints and so forth From the towns from the counties as wholes and from many of its ancient lordships the crown was entitled to archaic dues in kind such as honey The information of most general interest found in the great record is that on political personal ecclesiastical and social history which only occurs sporadically and as it were by accident Much of this was used by E A Freeman for his work on the Norman Conquest Although unique in character and of priceless value to the student Domesday will be found disappointing and largely unintelligible to any but the specialist Even scholars are unable to explain portions of its language and of its system This is partly due to its very early date which has placed between it and later records a gulf that is hard to bridge But in the Dialogus de scaccario temp Hen II it is spoken of as a record from the arbitrament of which there was no appeal from which its popular name of Domesday

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