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  • The Annotated Prince - Wikisource, the free online library
    III Concerning mixed principalities IV Why the kingdom of Darius conquered by Alexander did not rebel against the successors of Alexander at his death V Concerning the way to govern cities or principalities which lived under their own laws before they were annexed VI Concerning new principalities which are acquired by one s own arms and ability VII Concerning new principalities which are acquired either by the arms of others or by good fortune VIII Concerning those who have obtained a principality by wickedness IX Concerning a civil principality X Concerning the way in which the strength of all principalities ought to be measured XI Concerning ecclesiastical principalities XII How many kinds of soldiery there are and concerning mercenaries XIII Concerning auxiliaries mixed soldiery and one s own XIV That which concerns a prince on the subject of the art of war XV Concerning things for which men and especially princes are praised or blamed XVI Concerning liberality and meanness XVII Concerning cruelty and clemency and whether it is better to be loved than feared XVIII Concerning the way in which princes should keep faith XIX That one should avoid being despised and hated XX Are fortresses and many other things to which princes often resort advantageous or hurtful XXI How a prince should conduct himself so as to gain renown XXII Concerning the secretaries of princes XXIII How flatterers should be avoided XXIV Why the princes of Italy have lost their states XXV What fortune can effect in human affairs and how to withstand her XXVI An exhortation to liberate Italy from the barbarians Glossary of Proper Names This work is a translation and has a separate copyright status to the applicable copyright protections of the original content Original This work was published before January 1 1923 and is

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  • The Prince (Hill Thomson) - Wikisource, the free online library
    Princedoms Chapter XII How Many Different Kinds of Soldiers There Are and of Mercenaries Chapter XIII Of Auxiliary Mixed and National Arms Chapter XIV Of the Duty of a Prince In Respect of Military Affairs Chapter XV Of the Qualities In Respect of Which Men and Most of all Princes Are Praised or Blamed Chapter XVI Of Liberality and Miserliness Chapter XVII Of Cruelty and Clemency and Whether It Is Better To Be Loved or Feared Chapter XVIII How Princes Should Keep Faith Chapter XIX That a Prince Should Seek to Escape Contempt and Hatred Chapter XX Whether Fortresses and Certain Other Expedients to Which Princes Often Have Recourse are Profitable or Hurtful Chapter XXI How a Prince Should Bear Himself So As to Acquire Reputation Chapter XXII Of the Secretaries of Princes Chapter XXIII That Flatterers Should Be Shunned Chapter XXIV Why the Princes of Italy Have Lost Their States Chapter XXV What Fortune Can Effect in Human Affairs and How She May Be Withstood Chapter XXVI An Exhortation to Liberate Italy from the Barbarians This work is a translation and has a separate copyright status to the applicable copyright protections of the original content Original This work was published before January 1 1923 and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Public domain Public domain false false Translation This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1921 so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 80 years or less This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Prince_%28Hill_Thomson%29 (2016-02-13)
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  • Ninian Hill Thomson - Wikisource, the free online library
    in 1921 so works by this author are also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 80 years or less Works by this author may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 70890100 LCCN nb99149652 Project Gutenberg 5985 English Wikisource 144882 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author Ninian Hill Thomson oldid 5668111 Categories Authors Th 1830 births Early modern authors 1921 deaths Modern authors Male authors Author PD old 80 1923 Hidden categories Author pages without image Author pages with gender in Wikidata Author pages connected to Wikidata Author pages with authority control data Pages using authority control with parameters Author pages with VIAF on Wikidata Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Author Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Tools What links here Related

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:Ninian_Hill_Thomson (2016-02-13)
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  • Discourses on Livy - Wikisource, the free online library
    offered you more You may well complain of the poverty of my endeavor since these narrations of mine are poor and of the fallacy of my judgement when I deceive myself in many parts of my discussion Which being so I do not know which of us should be less obligated to the other either I to you who have forced me to write that which by myself I would not have written or you to me that having written I have not satisfied you Accept this therefore in that manner that all things are taken from friends where always the intention of the sender is more than the quality of the thing that is sent And believe me I obtain satisfaction from this when I think that even if I should have been deceived on many occasions I know I have not erred on this one in having selected you to whom above all other of my friends I address dedicate these Discourses as much because in doing this it appears to me I have shown some gratitude for the benefits I have received as well because it appears to me I have departed from the common usage of those writers who usually always address dedicate their works to some Prince and blinded by ambition and avarice laud him for all his virtuous qualities when they should be censuring him for all his shameful parts Whence I so as not to incur this error have selected not those who are Princes but those who by their infinite good qualities would merit to be such and not to those who could load me with rank honors and riches but to those who although unable to would want to do so For men when they want to judge rightly should esteem

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Discourses_on_Livy (2016-02-13)
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  • Creating Discourses on Livy (Hill Thomson's translation) - Wikisource, the free online library
    other namespace relevant templates Warning You are not logged in Your IP address will be recorded in this page s edit history Anti spam check Do not fill this in Summary By clicking the Save page button you are agreeing to the Terms of Use the Privacy Policy and you irrevocably agree to release your contribution under the CC BY SA 3 0 License and the GFDL You agree that

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/w/index.php?title=Discourses_on_Livy_%28Hill_Thomson%27s_translation%29&action=edit&redlink=1 (2016-02-13)
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  • History of Florence and Of the Affairs Of Italy - Wikisource, the free online library
    Book III Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter V Chapter VI Chapter VII Book V Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter V Chapter VI Chapter VII Book VII Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter V Chapter VI Book II Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter V Chapter VI Chapter VII Chapter VIII Chapter IX Book IV Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter V Chapter VI Chapter VII Book VI Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter V Chapter VI Chapter VII Book VIII Chapter I Chapter II Chapter III Chapter IV Chapter V Chapter VI Chapter VII With an Introduction by HUGO ALBERT RENNERT Ph D Professor of Romanic Languages and Literature University of Pennsylvania PREPARER S NOTE This text was typed up from a Universal Classics Library edition published in 1901 by W Walter Dunne New York and London The translator was not named The book contains a photogravure of Niccolò Machiavelli from an engraving This work is a translation and has a separate copyright status to the applicable copyright protections of the original content Original This work was published before January 1 1923 and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Public domain Public domain false false Translation This work was published before January 1 1923 and it is anonymous or pseudonymous due to unknown authorship It is in the public domain in the United States as well as countries and areas where the copyright terms of anonymous or pseudonymous works are 100 years or less since publication Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title History of Florence and Of the Affairs Of Italy

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/History_of_Florence_and_Of_the_Affairs_Of_Italy (2016-02-13)
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  • A description of the methods adopted by the Duke Valentino when murdering Vitellozzo Vitelli, Oliverotto da Fermo, the Signor Pagolo, and the Duke di Gravina Orsini - Wikisource, the free online library
    da Fermo was sent to propose that if the duke wished to undertake an expedition against Tuscany they were ready if he did not wish it then they would besiege Sinigalia To this the duke replied that he did not wish to enter into war with Tuscany and thus become hostile to the Florentines but that he was very willing to proceed against Sinigalia It happened that not long afterwards the town surrendered but the fortress would not yield to them because the castellan would not give it up to any one but the duke in person therefore they exhorted him to come there This appeared a good opportunity to the duke as being invited by them and not going of his own will he would awaken no suspicions And the more to reassure them he allowed all the French men at arms who were with him in Lombardy to depart except the hundred lancers under Mons di Candales his brother in law He left Cesena about the middle of December and went to Fano and with the utmost cunning and cleverness he persuaded the Vitelli and Orsini to wait for him at Sinigalia pointing out to them that any lack of compliance would cast a doubt upon the sincerity and permanency of the reconciliation and that he was a man who wished to make use of the arms and councils of his friends But Vitellozzo remained very stubborn for the death of his brother warned him that he should not offend a prince and afterwards trust him nevertheless persuaded by Pagolo Orsini whom the duke had corrupted with gifts and promises he agreed to wait Upon this the duke before his departure from Fano which was to be on 30th December 1502 communicated his designs to eight of his most trusted followers among whom were Don Michele and the Monsignor d Euna who was afterwards cardinal and he ordered that as soon as Vitellozzo Pagolo Orsini the Duke di Gravina and Oliverotto should arrive his followers in pairs should take them one by one entrusting certain men to certain pairs who should entertain them until they reached Sinigalia nor should they be permitted to leave until they came to the duke s quarters where they should be seized The duke afterwards ordered all his horsemen and infantry of which there were more than two thousand cavalry and ten thousand footmen to assemble by daybreak at the Metauro a river five miles distant from Fano and await him there He found himself therefore on the last day of December at the Metauro with his men and having sent a cavalcade of about two hundred horsemen before him he then moved forward the infantry whom he accompanied with the rest of the men at arms Fano and Sinigalia are two cities of La Marca situate on the shore of the Adriatic Sea fifteen miles distant from each other so that he who goes towards Sinigalia has the mountains on his right

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_description_of_the_methods_adopted_by_the_Duke_Valentino_when_murdering_Vitellozzo_Vitelli,_Oliverotto_da_Fermo,_the_Signor_Pagolo,_and_the_Duke_di_Gravina_Orsini (2016-02-13)
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  • Niccolò Machiavelli - Wikisource, the free online library
    and you irrevocably agree to release your contribution under the CC BY SA 3 0 License and the GFDL You agree that a hyperlink or URL is sufficient attribution under the Creative Commons license Cancel Editing help opens in new window This page is a member of 7 hidden categories Category AC with 26 elements Category Author pages connected to Wikidata Category Author pages with VIAF on Wikidata Category Author

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/w/index.php?title=Author:Niccol%C3%B2_Machiavelli&action=edit§ion=3 (2016-02-13)
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