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  • The Hambledon Men - Wikisource, the free online library
    held the pen during the composition of this classic a word should however be said He was born in 1787 and lived almost as long as William Beldham dying in 1877 He was at his father s school at Enfield where Keats also was a scholar It was through Leigh Hunt that he came to know the Novellos and the Lambs and John Nyren and in 1828 he married Mary Victoria Novello who survived him until 1898 Together they compiled the Shakespeare Concordance by which their name lives Clarke himself became known all throughout England by his Shakespeare lectures and readings He made friends all his life and when he died these lines from his own pen were placed on his tomb at Genoa by his own wish Hic jacet Let not a bell be toll d or tear be shed When I am dead Let no night dog with dreary howl Or ghastly shriek of boding owl Make harsh a change so calm so hallowed Lay not my bed Mid yews and never blooming cypresses But under trees Of simple flow r and odorous breath The lime and dog rose and beneath Let primrose cups give up their honied lees To sucking bees Who all the shining day while labouring Shall drink and sing A requiem o er my peaceful grave For I would cheerful quiet have Or no noise ruder than the linnet s wing Or brook gurgling In harmony I ve liv d so let me die That while mid gentler sounds this shell doth lie The Spirit aloft may float in spheral harmony The Rev John Mitford s review of Nyren s book on p 121 was printed in the Gentleman s Magazine for July and September 1833 Mr Mitford was then Rector of Benhall in Suffolk and was Sylvanus Urban too He had peculiar opportunities of writing with knowledge of the early game for he kept a Nestor on the premises in the person of old Fennex who had been an All England man for years Mr Mitford wrote Mr Pycroft in his Oxford Memories 1886 related to me his first introduction to William Fennex as follows One evening we had been practising so much to our own satisfaction that one of our number doing what he pleased with the bowling fancied that for the time with eye well in he could keep up his wicket at that moment against Lillywhite himself Just then it happened that I observed a hale and hearty man of between fifty and sixty years of age leaning on his stick with a critical expression of countenance which induced me to say I think from the interest you take in our game that you have been a player in your day This led to a few observations about a defect in my friend s play and eventually Fennex for he it was offered to bowl a few balls Much to our surprise he rattled about our stumps in a way that showed us that in the art of cricket there was after all a great deal more than was dreamt of in our philosophy Fennex had a very high underhand delivery rather after the style of David Harris as described by John Nyren who seemed to force the ball forward from under his arm pitching with great spin and very near the bat with a very abrupt rise and defying forward play That evening I had much talk with Fennex about the old game and the new He said You can see sir my bowling would be queer if I were a younger man and some of our old bowlers much as it is the fashion to despise the fair underhand bowling would rip up your present players in no time at all Indeed people have no notion of what the best of the old under hand bowlers could do This observation was confirmed by Mr Ward who said that the round arm bowling was rendered necessary rather because the old under hand bowlers were used up and that there were many difficult bowlers he met in the counties who were not brought forward and the old style ceased to have its fair chance In confirmation of this view of the case I must cite the case of William Clarke The result of this meeting was that Fennex was hospitably appointed by Mr Mitford to a sinecure office created expressly in his honour in the beautiful gardens of Benhall and Pilch 1 and Box and Bayley and all his old acquaintance will not be surprised to hear that the old man would carefully water and roll his little cricket ground on summer mornings and on wet and wintry days would sit in the chimney corner dealing over and over again by the hour to an imaginary partner a very dark and dingy pack of cards and would then sally forth to teach a longremembered lesson to some hob nailed frequenter of the village ale house Mr Mitford s name does not occur in Lillywhite s Cricket Scores and Biographies and I have no record of his proficiency in the field But he could write of cricket with gusto and he reverenced the past He died in 1859 aged seventy eight To pass from the Rev John Mitford to the Rev James Pycroft and The Cricket Field is a very easy transition for it was upon the MS volume where is it now of Fennex s reminiscences which the older enthusiast sent to the younger in 1836 that the historical part of that book was founded The Cricket Field from the second edition of which 1854 I quote the two chapters on the Hambledon men together with other matters elsewhere in these pages remains after Nyren the best book on the game It has that blend of simplicity and enthusiasm which is essential to the good writer on cricket and cricketers Mr Pycroft does not seem to have known Nyren personally but he had the inestimable advantage of conversing with William Beldham and these conversations together with the Fennex MS and correspondence with Mr Budd with whom he had also played put him in a stronger position than any historian of the game can ever occupy again The Cricket Field is now in its tenth edition and will I hope reach many more In 1836 James Pycroft was twenty three years of age and had just become a B A of Oxford and in that same year he immortalized his memory by reviving with Bishop Ryle the Oxford and Cambridge match Four years later in 1840 he took orders and subsequently settling at Bath played for the Lansdown Club and spent most of his leisure in preparing The Cricket Field 1851 The Cricket Tutor 1862 Cricketana 1865 and other books including a novel or two I should also remark that as early as 1835 he had put forth a pamphlet on The Principles of Scientific Batting His last book was Oxford Memories 1886 a work in which the author doubtless meant to be faithful to his theme but in which the bat beats the University again and again and at length drives it from the field altogether Like his great predecessor John Nyren Mr Pycroft was a left hander During his latter years he lived at Brighton and I remember well his tall erect clerical figure clad always in black with a cape and a silk hat his pure white hair and a fringe of white whisker his pink cheeks and bright eyes He disliked to sit formally in the Pavilion but would walk round and round the ground pausing or I might say hovering every few steps to watch the play more closely He died in 1895 aged eighty two sharing some of the longevity of his friends Mr Budd who was ninety and Beldham ninety eight Old Clarke s letter I take from William Bolland s Cricket Notes 1851 William Bolland was Perpetual President of the I Zingari and a great friend of the Ponsonbys with whom and Tom Taylor and others he founded the Old Stagers Dramatic Club in 1842 His other claim to memory could there be a better is that he was a friend of Thackeray and the original of Fred Bayham in The Newcomes William Bolland was the son of Judge Bolland for whom he acted as marshal but he took his legal duties very lightly He was a better actor than cricketer and a better companion than either Old Clarke in point of years is well outside the limits of this book since although a great performer at Nottingham from 1816 onwards he did not play at Lord s in the first class game as we say until 1836 when he was thirty seven and was not considered good enough for the Players against the Gentlemen until ten years later But in all respects save the date he belonged to the old traditions bowling under hand till the end Caffyn who was a member of his team says of him in his excellent book Seventy Not Out From what I have read of the old Hambledon Club bowlers I should be inclined to think that Clarke was an exact counterpart of some of them He was more than an ordinary under hand bowler as under hand bowling was understood both in my time and at the present He was by no means a bad bat being a hard and clean hitter but he was greatly handicapped in this department through having had the sight of his right eye destroyed at fives at which game he excelled almost as much as at cricket He would play this game for hours together and made such hard work of it that when he leaned exhausted against the wall of the fives court he often left a sort of silhouette of himself in perspiration on the wall Clarke was above medium height and inclining to stoutness He had a kind of half grim half smiling expression especially when he was getting wickets easily The picture of him in The Cricket Field is an excellent one He was always eager to get the best end of a wicket to bowl on I ll have this end and you can have which you like he would say to his fellow bowler Better counsel on cricket than Old Clarke s in this Letter I never read It is so wise and so racy too He thought of everything and one feels by innuendo paid off several old scores on the way The reference to the funny man for example on p 170 one imagines a distinct offender in the old man s eye The conversation with the Sixth Earl of Bessborough I have extracted by the kind permission of the author from a little gossiping and entertaining History of Kennington which Bishop Montgomery himself a cricketer wrote in 1889 with a very interesting account of Old Cricket and Surrey Cricket at the end of it Against the score of the Eton and Harrow match of 1864 Mr Haygarth writes in Lilly white s book Mr Henry Hutchinson Montgomery s first match at Lord s Is a fine free hitter combined with great steadiness and had he only been able to participate in the great matches of the day he would most likely have highly distinguished himself in the national pastime of Old England As a field he excels at point standing up close and pluckily to the opposing batsman On the three occasions he appeared in the Harrow Eleven against Eton he had the good fortune each time to be on the winning side and each time in a single innings In May 1866 at Harrow he won distance 200 yards the Champion Ebrington cup Lord Bessborough is better known to cricketers as the Hon Frederick Ponsonby perhaps the best judge of the game in his day He was born in 1815 played his first match at Lord s for Harrow against Eton in 1832 founded the I Zingari in 1845 succeeded to the peerage in 1880 and died in 1895 He comes within the scope of this book only by virtue of what he had heard of Lambert and Lord Frederick Beauclerk and his recollections of Old Clarke and it was to him it will be noticed that Old Clarke s letter is dedicated Ponsonby and his life long friend Bob Grimston whose life the late Frederick Gale wrote with such spirit and affection were the patron saints of Harrow cricket Lord Charles Russell s very rare little pamphlet of cricket recollections was dedicated in 1879 to these old friends once champions of cricket now guardians of that game with this stanza beneath Old Damon and old Pythias Were always found together I never saw those chums apart In smooth or stormy weather But Ponsonby and Grimston Triumphantly compare With that somewhat sentimental Superannuated pair Harrow Classic I should like to say much more of Ponsonby and Grimston but if at all it must be in another book They belong to the great round arm period from Lillywhite to Southerton say of which there is as much to write as of the Hambledon men with better chance of getting first hand recollections too The Memoirs of the Old Cricketers which come next are brought together here from the first volume of Lillywhite s Cricket Scores and Biographies to which they were contributed by the late Mr Arthur Haygarth after years of patient toil It would be impossible to praise too highly his efforts towards commemorating the early players of the great game It was his life work in the fullest sense of that term Mr Haygarth was born at Hastings on August 4th 1825 and was educated at Harrow From the account of him probably by Fred Lillywhite in Vol iii of the Scores and Biographies against a match in 1842 between Harrow and Harrow Town I take this passage As a batsman he has proved himself to be one of the steadiest there ever has been forward in style and has made many a long innings as to time especially in the Gentlemen v Players matches in 1846 1855 and 1857 having been chosen to play in this the match of the season no less than sixteen times before he had completed his thirty fourth year Has however very little hit except the drive but his patience and perseverance when at the wicket like the late Tom Walker of Surrey have proved very tiring to his adversaries He generally went in early first wicket down and often took the sting out of the bowling by getting his runs remarkably slow on an average perhaps not more than ten or twelve in an hour Lillywhite s Guide of 1856 has the following of him Is a terror to the bowlers opposed to him commanding as he does a very strong defence and the patience of Job In the Autumn Edition of the Guide of 1860 are also the following remarks His defence is really perfect and he will play the best bowling with the greatest science and ease He will take a long time to get an innings and is in consequence of great annoyance to his opponents For about fifteen seasons being very active he always took long leg Pavilion end at Lord s and middle wicket but afterward generally short leg He participated in the game from first to last for twenty seasons and curiously enough during his whole career he never once hit his wicket or was caught at cover point Mr Haygarth brought to a close the Scores and Biographies in 1895 with volume xiv Of himself and his great task it is there written He is the sole compiler of the whole of the Cricket Scores and Biographies a work to which he has devoted his entire life commencing at sixteen years of age and he has spent a small fortune in collecting the materials and facts contained in the same He has loved his arduous task with an abiding affection and was never weary in seeking out unexplored fields that promised to contain any records or novelties connected with the noble game He wishes however to observe and to call to the notice of all true cricketers that the statement made at the beginning of vol i that the late William Lillywhite or his son Frederick had any thing to do in the slightest degree with the compilation is totally and completely false That paragraph was inserted by W Lillywhite s son F to suit his own ends The great wish of the compiler A H always has been and still is to bring up his work to date and though he has had to encounter much opposition and numerous obstacles he hopes yet to succeed It may also be mentioned that he has worked at the Scores and Biographies entirely and gratuitously throughout and solely on account of his love for the game and for no other reason or object As a batsman his defence during the twenty years he appeared at Lord s on the rough bumpy and often dangerous wickets as used in his time was considered to have been equal to any other cricketer of his day especially against fast bowling though his hitting was poor entirely through lack of physical strength From the age of eight to twelve 1833 1837 he was at Temple Grove School East Sheen Surrey being part of that time under the care of Doctor Pinkney who was succeeded by Mr Thompson as head master He went to Harrow School in September 1839 and having formed one of the Eleven in 1842 and 1843 which contended victoriously at Lord s v Winchester and Eton he left that nursery of amateur cricketers in July 1843 and it may be added that during the twenty years he

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  • Edward Verrall Lucas - Wikisource, the free online library
    1 1 Contributions to 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica 1 2 DNB 1912 Supplement 2 Works about Lucas Works edit Highways and Byways in Sussex 1904 The Hambledon Men editor 1907 Rose and Rose A Story 1921 The Second Post A Companion to The Gentlest Art The Life of Charles Lamb Dodgson Charles Lutwidge in Dictionary of National Biography Supplement London Smith Elder Co 1901 in 3 vols The Debt A treasury of war poetry British and American poems of the world war 1914 1919 Part 23 The Fallen p 375 Contributions to 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica edit Austen Jane in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 Lamb Charles in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 DNB 1912 Supplement edit Leno Dan May Philip William Works about Lucas edit Death Edward Verrall Lucas in The Times 1938 Some or all works by this author are in the public domain in the United States because they were published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1938 so works by this author are also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 75 years or less Works by this author may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 30334993 LCCN n80037002 ISNI 0000 0001 2100 3508 GND 118884964 SUDOC 076053644 NDL 01032938 NTA 067618073 Project Gutenberg 818 Open Library OL113754A ODNB 101034622 English Wikisource 378802 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author Edward Verrall Lucas oldid 6098655 Categories Contributors to DNB 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica contributors Authors Lu 1868 births Early modern authors 1938 deaths Modern authors Male authors Author PD old 75 1923

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  • Euripides (Mahaffy) - Wikisource, the free online library
    OF HIS WORKS 39 Chapter IV HIS PLOTS 45 Chapter V DRAMAS OF CHARACTER AND OF SITUATION THE CYCLOPS 65 Chapter VI SPECIAL CHARACTERS HEROINES 88 Chapter VII HEROES HERALDS SLAVES 101 Chapter VIII HIS LYRIC POETRY CHORAL ODES MONODIES 111 Chapter IX PROLOGUES EPILOGUES LESSER CHARACTERISTICS 120 Chapter X THE HISTORY AND FORTUNES OF HIS WORKS 128 CLASSICAL WRITERS EURIPIDES J P MAHAFFY Edited by J R GREEN This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1919 so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 80 years or less This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Euripides Mahaffy oldid 6019746 Categories 1879 works Ancient drama PD old 80 1923 Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history

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  • John Pentland Mahaffy - Wikisource, the free online library
    Greek Literature 1880 Old Greek Education 1881 Greek Life and Thought 1887 The Story of Alexander s Empire 1887 The Greek World Under Roman Sway 1890 Problems in Greek History 1892 The Empire of the Ptolemies 1893 The Progress of Hellenism in Alexander s Empire 1905 The Silver Age of the Greek World 1906 Translations edit Fischer Kuno A Commentary on Kant s Critick of the Pure Reason 1866 Some or all works by this author are in the public domain in the United States because they were published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1919 so works by this author are also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 80 years or less Works by this author may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 76358022 LCCN n50041037 ISNI 0000 0001 2140 1362 GND 116679506 SUDOC 03026992X BNF cb12172160p NLA 35985673 NTA 070705690 Project Gutenberg 37584 Freebase m 0phzk ODNB 101034833 English Wikisource 484253 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author John Pentland Mahaffy oldid 6068582 Categories Authors Ma 1839 births Early modern authors 1919 deaths Modern authors Male authors Author PD old 80 1923 Irish authors Irish Anglicans Irish philosophers Theologians Classical scholars Educators Translators Hidden categories Author pages with image Author pages with gender in Wikidata Author pages connected to Wikidata Author pages with authority control data Pages using authority control with parameters Author pages with VIAF on Wikidata Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Author Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history

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  • Wikisource:Works/2016 - Wikisource, the free online library
    menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Project page Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Download print Create a book Download as PDF Printable version In other languages Add

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  • Poetry - Wikisource, the free online library
    May And summer s lease hath all too short a date Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines And often is his gold complexion dimm d And every fair from fair sometime declines By chance or nature s changing course untrimm d But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow st Nor shall death brag thou wander st in his shade When in eternal lines to time thou grow st So long as men can breathe or eyes can see So long lives this and this gives life to thee Author William Shakespeare edit view Categories Subcategories of Poems Poems Poems by era Poems by form Poems by author Collections of poetry Poems by religion Poems by country Poems by genre Poems by theme Poems of the Confederacy Redirects to poems edit view Did you know did you know To a Mouse written by Robert Burns in 1785 deals with the narrator s destruction unawares of a mouse s nest as he pursued his winter plowing and was the inspiration behind the title of John Steinbeck s 1937 novel Of Mice and Men did you know Dulce et Decorum est was orginally written as a personal letter to Jessie Pope known for her pro war poems widely published during World War I edit view Featured author Edgar Allan Poe January 19 1809 October 7 1849 was an American poet short story writer editor and critic and one of the leaders of the American Romantics He is best known for his tales of the macabre and his poems as well as being one of the early practitioners of the short story and a progenitor of detective fiction as well as crime fiction in the United States Poe died at the age of 40

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  • Ancient poetry - Wikisource, the free online library
    Apollonius Rhodius Sappho Abu l Qasim Suri Virgil Ancient poetry edit Table of contents A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Collections edit Ancient Egyptian Love Poems Fragments of poetry by Julius Caesar The Poems of Sappho A edit Aeneid Dryden translation B edit Baucis and Philemon Wikisource translation C edit Carmina The poems of Catullus H edit Hymn to Ares Hymn to Dionysus I edit The Iliad Homer Butler translation M edit Marius Metamorphoses O edit The Odyssey Homer Butler translation Cowper translation On his Consulship S edit Satires Horace Shield of Herakles T edit Theogony See also edit Portal Poetry Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Portal Ancient poetry oldid 4779167 Categories Language portals Portals Ancient poets Ancient poetry Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Portal Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history More Search Navigation Main Page Community portal Central discussion Recent changes Subject index Authors Random work Random author Random transcription Help Donate Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information

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  • Romantic poetry - Wikisource, the free online library
    tributes to the perfection of nature and often casting utopian philosophies about humanity in the process This series Romantic poetry encompasses only the third of these three ages the former two being under Renaissance poetry This portal is for the artistic movement you may be looking for Portal Love poetry or Portal Erotic poetry Subpages Romantic era poets Romantic era poems Romantic era poets edit Blake William Burns Robert Byron George Gordon Lord Coleridge Samuel Taylor Hugo Victor Keats John Shelley Percy Bysshe Southey Robert Wordsworth William Romantic era poems edit Table of contents A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A edit The Alchemists Samuel Taylor Coleridge B edit To a Beautiful Quaker Lord Byron The Book of Thel William Blake C edit The Cloud Percy Shelley The Cornelian Lord Byron D edit The Daffodils E edit Endymion John Keats The Eve of St Agnes John Keats F edit The First Kiss of Love Lord Byron Evolution Langdon Smith H edit Hebrew Melodies Byron Hyperion Keats I edit Isabella John Keats K edit Kubla Khan Samuel Taylor Coleridge L edit Lamia John Keats Letter on Browne Samuel Taylor Coleridge Lines Addressed to a Young Lady Lord Byron Love s Philosophy Percy Shelley M edit To the Moon Percy Shelley O edit Ode to Autumn Ode on a Grecian Urn Ode Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood Ode on Melancholy Ode to a Nightingale Ode to Psyche Ode to the West Wind Ozymandias R edit The Rime of the Ancient Mariner S edit Songs of Experience William Blake Songs of Innocence William Blake To Stella Shelley Percy Shelley T edit Thoughts Suggested by a College Examination Lord Byron Thought

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