archive-org.com » ORG » W » WIKISOURCE.ORG

Total: 1648

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • The Oak (Ward) - Wikisource, the free online library
    renders it now quite impossible to master the works which appear almost daily on various branches of science or to keep up with the proceedings of our numerous Scientific Societies A distinguished statesman has recently expressed the opinion that we cannot expect in the next fifty years any advance in science at all comparable to that of the last half century Without wishing to dogmatise I should be disposed to hope that in the future the progress of science will be even more rapid In the first place the number of students is far greater in the second our means of research the microscope and telescope the spectroscope photography and many other ingenious appliances are being added to and rendered more effective year by year and above all the circle of science is ever widening so that the farther we advance the more numerous are the problems opening out before us No doubt there are other Scientific Series but it is not believed that the present will exactly compete with any of them The International Scientific Series and Nature Series are no doubt useful and excellent and some of the volumes contained in them would well carry out the ideas of the Publishers but as a rule they are somewhat more technical and go into minuter details The names of the Authors are a sufficient guarantee that the subjects will be treated in an interesting and thoroughly scientific manner High Elms Farnborough November 1891 CONTENTS chapter page Introduction 1 I The Acorn and its Germination the Seedling 10 II The Seedling and Young Plant 24 III The Seedling and Young Plant continued Its Shoot system Distribution of the Tissues 39 IV The Seedling and Young Plant continued Structure of the Vascular Tissues etc 52 V The Seedling and Young Plant

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Oak_%28Ward%29 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Harry Marshall Ward - Wikisource, the free online library
    Ward Harry Marshall 1892 The Oak Laslett Thomas Ward Harry Marshall 1894 Timber and timber trees Ward Harry Marshall 1894 Text book of the diseases of trees Ward Harry Marshall 1901 Disease in plants Ward Harry Marshall 1909 Timber and some of its diseases Ward Harry Marshall Trees multiple volumes Contributions to EB1911 edit Bacteriology in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 in part Berkeley Miles Joseph in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 Cohn Ferdinand Julius in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 De Bary Heinrich Anton in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 Fungi in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 in part Plants in Encyclopædia Britannica 11th ed 1911 Pathology Articles in Popular Science Monthly edit Elementary Botany in General Education in Popular Science Monthly Volume 38 January 1891 Works about Ward edit Thiselton Dyer William 1913 Harry Marshall Ward 1854 1906 in Oliver Francis Wall ed Makers of British botany 261 279 Works by this author published before January 1 1923 are in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Translations or editions published later may be copyrighted Posthumous works may be copyrighted based on how long they have been published in certain countries and areas Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 8168537 LCCN n87103113 ISNI 0000 0000 8355 1019 GND 117565768 SUDOC 120535599 Botanist H M Ward Project Gutenberg 39791 Open Library OL2574054A Freebase m 080pfh ODNB 101036729 English Wikisource 585246 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author Harry Marshall Ward oldid 5832713 Categories 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica contributors Authors Wa 1854 births Early modern authors 1906 deaths Modern authors Male authors Author PD old Botanists with author abbreviations English authors United Kingdom authors Phytopathologists Hidden categories Author pages with image Author pages with gender in Wikidata

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:Harry_Marshall_Ward (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • File:A Wayfarer in China fp 168.jpg - Wikisource, the free online library
    in China fp 168 jpg English Memorial Arch to a Virtuous Widow Chengtu Plain Facing page 168 of book Date 1913 Source A Wayfarer in China http archive org details wayfarerinchinai00kendrich Author Elizabeth Kimball Kendall Licensing edit Public domain Public domain false false The author died in 1952 so this work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 60 years or less This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published or registered with the U S Copyright Office before January 1 1923 File history Click on a date time to view the file as it appeared at that time Date Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 19 30 8 July 2012 2 660 1 793 760 KB Keith Edkins int filedesc Information Description en 1 Memorial Arch to a Virtuous Widow Chengtu Plain Facing page 168 of book date 1913 Source A Wayfarer in China http archive org details wayfarerinchinai00kendrich Author Elizabeth Kim File usage The following 4 pages link to this file A Wayfarer in China Chapter 8 User William Maury Morris II Wikisource

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/File:A_Wayfarer_in_China_fp_168.jpg (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • A Wayfarer in China - Wikisource, the free online library
    country best were most ready to speed me onward And as the following pages show there was nothing to fear I had no difficulties no adventures hardly enough to make the tale interesting It is true I had some special advantages I was an American and a woman and no longer young Chinese respect for grey hair is a very real thing a woman is not feared as a man may be and hostility is often nothing more than fear and even in remote Szechuan I met men who knew that the American Government had returned the Boxer indemnity and who looked kindly upon me for that reason If the word of certain foreigners is to be trusted I gained in not knowing the language the people would not take advantage of my helplessness That seems rather incredible if it is true the whole Western world has something to learn of China But I could not have done what I did without the wise and generous aid of many whom I met along the way Europeans and Chinese officials merchants and above all missionaries everywhere the pioneers To them all I tender here my grateful thanks And to the representatives of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank wherever I met them and also to those of the Russo Asiatic Bank I would express my gratitude for many courtesies shown me As I look back I know it was worth while all of it Half a dozen months count for little toward the real understanding of a strange civilization but it is something to have seen a great people in its home to have watched it at work and at play for you have been forced once again to realize that although East is East and West is West the thing that most matters is the nature of the man and that everywhere human nature is much the same The Orchard Wellesley Massachusetts November 1912 CONTENTS I Across Tonking 3 II Days in Yunnan Fu 24 III Across Yunnan 41 IV The Chien ch ang 71 V On the Mandarin Road 101 VI Tachienlu 123 VII The Lesser Trail 139 VIII Across Chengtu Plain 161 IX Omei Shan the Sacred 180 X Down the Yangtse 202 XI From the Great River to the Great Wall 221 XII The Mongolian Grassland 236 XIII Across the Desert of Gobi 256 XIV Urga the Sacred City 276 XV North to the Siberian Railway 289 XVI A Few First Impressions of China 308 Index 323 ILLUSTRATIONS The Little Fu t ou Caravan Headman p 6 Frontispiece Map of Chinese Empire 3 A Yunnan Valley 22 Outside the Walls of Yunnan Fu 22 My Sedan Chair and Bearers 32 A Memorial Arch near Yunnan Fu 32 Map of West China 42 On a Yunnan Road My Caravan The Military Escort 44 Wu ting chou Temple Getaway Temple Corner 60 Lolo Girls 80 Tame Wild Lolos 80 A Memorial Arch Szechuan 92 Fortified Village in the Chien

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Wayfarer_in_China (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Elizabeth Kimball Kendall - Wikisource, the free online library
    for School Use 1902 Some or all works by this author are in the public domain in the United States because they were published before January 1 1923 The author died in 1952 so works by this author are also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 60 years or less Works by this author may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 246640439 GND 159116910 Project Gutenberg 32712 English Wikisource 1344259 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author Elizabeth Kimball Kendall oldid 5660217 Categories Authors Ke 1855 births Early modern authors 1952 deaths Modern authors Women authors Author PD old 60 1923 Hidden categories Author pages without image Author pages with gender in Wikidata Author pages connected to Wikidata Author pages with authority control data Pages using authority control with parameters Author pages with VIAF on Wikidata Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Author Discussion Variants Views

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:Elizabeth_Kimball_Kendall (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • File:Hakewill, A Picturesque Tour of the Island of Jamaica, Plate 17.jpg - Wikisource, the free online library
    Public domain Public domain false false This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 100 years or less You must also include a United States public domain tag to indicate why this work is in the public domain in the United States This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law including all related and neighboring rights Licensing edit Public domain Public domain false false This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author s life plus 100 years or less You must also include a United States public domain tag to indicate why this work is in the public domain in the United States This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law including all related and neighboring rights File history Click on a date time to view the file as it appeared at that time Date Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 20 52 1 July 2012 2 412 1 572 1 MB Iain Bell Information Description Bryan Castle Great House Trelawny Source Orignal Hakewill 1875 A Picturesque Tour of the Island of Jamaica br Scan http archive org details picturesquetouro00hake Internet Archive Date 1820 1824 Author File usage The following 4 pages link to this file A Picturesque Tour of the Island of Jamaica User William Maury Morris II Wikisource Proofread of the Month Page A Picturesque Tour of the Island of Jamaica djvu 88 Metadata This file contains additional information probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it If the file has been modified from its

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/File:Hakewill,_A_Picturesque_Tour_of_the_Island_of_Jamaica,_Plate_17.jpg (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • A Picturesque Tour of the Island of Jamaica - Wikisource, the free online library
    fourth sessions of 1791 bills were passed for further adding to these trustees In 1796 we again find the House occupied on the same subject and a bill passed for the erection of a stone bridge some difficulties however arising to the execution of this plan the cast iron bridge was at length resolved upon and erected in 1801 The banks of the Rio Cobre are naturally steep at this part of the river but the road was of necessity much raised above the natural level in order to insure a free watercourse at those times when the rainy season swelled the river to its greatest height and the vast body of water rolled along with an impetuosity to which nothing could afford an effectual resistance The suddenness and violence of these risings of the rivers can scarcely be imagined by reference to European streams When heavy rains take place in the mountains the first notice to the traveller is the roaring of the river above and as his attention is directed to the point from whence the sound proceeds he sees the appalling spectacle of the foaming waves dashing furiously along and bearing away in its violence immense trees which it has rooted up in its progress and not unfrequently the bodies of negroes who have attempted to pass a well known ford but who have been surprised by its unexpected depth and carried along by the violence of the stream This view is taken from the sloping grounds to the left of the Bridge in approaching Spanish Town from Kingston Under the arch appears the residence of Angus Kennedy Esq Provost Marshal Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by Sutherland Kingston Port Royal From Windsor Farm KINGSTON AND PORT ROYAL FROM WINDSOR FARM The city of Kingston was founded in the year 1693 The plan of it was drawn by Colonel Lilly an experienced engineer and in propriety of design it is perhaps not excelled by any town in the world The plan is a parallelogram one mile in length by half a mile in breadth traversed regularly by streets and lanes alternately crossing each other at right angles except in the upper part of the town where a large square is left but the buildings have now spread much beyond the boundary of the original plans The harbour is formed by an inlet of the sea which after passing Port Royal divides into two branches the western flowing to Passage Fort and the mouth of the Rio Cobre forms a small bay of shallow water the eastern branch runs beyond Kingston to Rock Fort making a course this way of nine miles in length and in the broadest part facing which the town is situated of two miles in breadth For a considerable way above and below the town the channel is deep enough to admit ships of the greatest burthen a thousand sail may anchor here in perfect safety and the water is so deep at the wharfs that vessels of 200 tons lie alongside to deliver their cargoes At the bottom of the town near the water side is the marketplace which is plentifully supplied with butcher s meat poultry fish and vegetables The latter are brought from the Liguanea mountains and are excellent the beef is chiefly from the pastures of Pedros in St Ann the mutton from the salt pan lands in St Catharine The square before mentioned at the upper end of the town is more generally called the Parade On the south side forming the N W angle of King Street is the parish church a plain convenient brick structure but without any pretensions to architectural beauty on the north side are the barracks and theatre the former accommodates about 400 men the latter will contain about 700 persons it belongs to the public and the performers pay into the public funds ten pounds for every night of performance But the handsomest building in Kingston is the Scotch Church in Duke Street which was erected about the year 1814 by a public subscription from a plan of James Delancy Esq It is of an octagon figure extending eighty six feet nine inches in the clear from east to west and sixty two feet seven inches from north to south having four entrances east west north and south with a portico over each entrance It is calculated to hold 1 000 persons The number of houses paying tax in Kingston are about 1 300 of the untaxed it is difficult to obtain the precise number but they may be stated at between three and four hundred In 1802 the royal assent was given to the act for constituting Kingston a corporation under the name of the Mayor Aldermen and Commonalty of the City and Parish of Kingston The election of officers took place on the 15th of November PORT ROYAL Is situated on the point of a peninsular or narrow neck of land called the Palisadoe which projecting from the main land about eight miles and three quarters forms a barrier to the harbour of Kingston against the sea The foundation of it was first laid by General Brayne in 1757 It was then called Cagua a corruption probably of Ceragua the Indian name for the Coratoe or great aloe which overspreads the adjacent Salt pan hill In 1672 it contained eight hundred well built houses and twenty years after the number was increased to two thousand it had then attained the height of its splendour In 1692 it contained upwards of three thousand five hundred inhabitants the greater number of the houses were of brick several stories in height founded close to the very brink of the water on a loose bank of land The fort which mounted sixty pieces of cannon and the rest of the houses were built on the rocky part of the peninsula On the 7th of June 1692 between eleven and twelve o clock at noon began that terrible earthquake which in two minutes produced such a scene of devastation All the principal streets which were next the water sunk at once with the people in them a high rolling sea followed closing immediately over them Not less than sixteen hundred were thus swallowed up Some of the streets were laid several fathoms under water and it stood so high as the upper rooms of those that remained It is computed that about two thousand whites and negroes perished the harbour had all the appearance of agitation as in a storm and the huge waves rolled with such violence as to snap the cables of the ships drive some from the anchors and overset others But the great advantage of the situation again attracted inhabitants and by degrees as the popular fears subsided the town increased in buildings and inhabitants though far short of its former state till 1703 when it was destroyed a second time by fire This ruinous accident caused another desertion to Kingston which thus began to thrive by the decline of her elder sister Port Royal was at this period reduced to a very low ebb yet it was not wholly abandoned it possessed some little trade and was the favourite resort of the seamen belonging to the men of war and privateers But what the earthquake and conflagration had spared was nearly demolished by a violent hurricane which happened on the 28th August 1722 It began at eight in the morning and lasted fourteen hours Port Royal as a place of defence is deservedly valued The ships in advancing towards the harbour must necessarily pass between shoals and rocks through a difficult channel in some parts extremely narrow and are inevitably exposed to a severe fire without the possibility of bringing their guns to bear Ahead they have a battery of twelve guns mostly forty two pounders called the twelve apostles built on a point of Salt pan hill above the range of an enemy s shot which would rake them the whole way until they tacked to steer up the harbour they are then exposed to the fire of this battery on one side to that of the fort on the other and in front to the battery of Fort Augusta The harbour is about one mile and three quarters in breadth but widens further on The view is taken from Windsor Farm the residence of Thomas Higson Esq and embraces a part of the city of Kingston the harbour Port Royal and the mountains of St Catherine GENERAL EXPORTS from Port of Kingston between the 29th of September 1820 and the 29th day of September 1821 Tonnage 77 867 Sugar Rum Casks of Molasses 7 Coffee Ginger Pimento Hhds 22 643 Trs 2 239 Bbls 1 224 Puns 8 874 Hhds 625 Casks 687 Lbs 9 437 089 Cks 170 Bags 98 Cks 857 Bags 3 305 Cocao Cotton Indigo Hides Log wood Fustic Nica wood Lignum Mahogany Cedar Lance wood Cks 640 Bags 57 Bales 7 199 Bags 955 Seroons 401 No 5 029 Tons 1 580 Tons 687 Tons 233 Tons 492 Logs 2 045 Logs 65 Spars 866 Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by Sutherland King s Square St Jago de a Vega Published Feb 1 1824 by Hurst Robinson Co 90 Cheapside E Lloyd Harley Street THE KING S SQUARE ST JAGO DE LA VEGA St Jago de la Vega generally known as Spanish Town is situated about thirteen miles from Kingston and six from Port Henderson the nearest shipping places The road from each is level and excellent It was fixed upon as the capital of the Island after the desertion of Sevilla Nueva a town on the north side near St Ann s Bay which had been founded by Juan de Esquivel who was appointed governor by Don Diego the son of Christopher Columbus Blome who compiled a short account of Jamaica so early as 1672 says that the town of St Jago de la Vega consisted of 2 000 houses two chapels and an abbey At present the number of houses paying taxes are 168 but as no house is assessed unless paying a rent above 50 the number may probably be about 600 It is the seat of government and has been so ever since the conquest of the island with the exception of a short period in 1754 and 1755 during the government of Charles Knowles Esq when five sessions of the House of Assembly were held in Kingston The chief ornament of Spanish Town is the King s Square on the east side of which is the House of Assembly on the west the King s House on the north Rodney s Temple and on the south the public offices The annexed view exhibits the first three buildings The interior of the King s House or residence of the Governor is well adapted to the climate the rooms are spacious and lofty and the whole is elegantly furnished the House of Assembly is large and convenient of Rodney s Temple a monument so honourable to the loyal and patriotic feelings of the island we shall give a more enlarged account On the 20th February 1783 the House of Assembly directed the Committee of Correspondence to write to Stephen Fuller Esq the agent for the island directing him to apply to the most eminent artist in England to prepare an elegant marble statue of Lord Rodney to be erected in the Parade of Spanish Town in commemoration of the glorious victory obtained by that gallant commander and the brave officers and seamen serving under him over the French fleet on the 12th of April 1782 In 1788 the statue was received at Kingston and its arrival renewing the public feeling towards it which the long delay had in some slight measure depressed a violent struggle commenced between Kingston and Spanish Town for the honour of its final possession A petition was presented to the House of Assembly from the inhabitants of Kingston and Port Royal in which they stated That they had subscribed a large sum of money for the purpose of conveying water from the Hope River to the Parade at Kingston by means of which they propose to form a spacious basin to surround the statue and that they had lately subscribed a further considerable sum to assist in erecting it but that they are penetrated with the deepest concern to find that a report prevails of its being intended to be placed in Spanish Town In this petition every argument to support the object of the petitioners was urged but a motion being made in consequence in the House of Assembly that the petition be referred to a committee of the whole House it was determined in the negative by the casting vote of the Speaker alone the numbers being for entertaining the petition 19 and 19 for its rejection A Committee was then appointed for determining the site in Spanish Town on which it should be erected who reported in favour of the Parade and for erecting the colonnade and public offices which form the wings The statue executed by the elder Bacon was erected on the 13th December 1792 and in the evening splendidly illuminated The whole expense of this national monument appears to have been 30 918 8 s 4 d currency of Jamaica The Barracks on the south side of the town are large and commodious The Church is an ancient brick structure of no exterior beauty but contains some fine monuments particularly those to the memory of the Earl and Countess of Effingham and Sir Adam Williamson The most ancient is an inscription upon a flat stone in the chancel to the memory of the wife of Sir Charles Lyttleton dated January 1662 Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by Sutherland Harbour Street Kingston Published Feb 1 1824 by Hurst Robinson Co 90 Cheapside E Lloyd Harley Street VIEW OF HARBOUR STREET KINGSTON looking eastward Harbour Street and King Street crossing each other at right angles are the principal streets in Kingston At the corner to the left is the store of Mr Netlam Tory and on the right that of Mr John Mais M A Further on on the same side of the way is Harty s Tavern the flag indicating a public entertainment Beyond is the Custom House marked by its high roof The great tree stands in front of Wood s Tavern The street is terminated at the distance of about half a mile by the residence of Edward Codd Esq Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by Sutherland Waterfall on the Windward Road near Kingston Published Apr 1 1824 by Hurst Robinson Co 90 Cheapside Lloyd Harley Street CASCADE ON THE WINDWARD ROAD The Cane River discharges itself into the sea at about the distance of seven miles from Kingston on the Windward Road The road runs for some way on the sea beach passing Rock Fort where there is a fine head of spring water from which the shipping is supplied and from whence it is in contemplation to supply Up park Camp and Kingston Rock Fort is in its situation very like the Torre dei Confini near Terracina forming the boundary mark between the dominions of the Pope and the King of Naples on the right the same brilliant sea on the left the same almost inaccessible mountains the Fort guarding the narrow pass Leaving his carriage at the Fall Tavern a small well served inn on the road side the traveller proceeds on horseback through a deep ravine between mountains of so great a height as scarcely to admit the rays of the sun At the bottom the Cane River takes its devious way sometimes stretching in a broad even bed sometimes urging its impetuous course among rocks of considerable magnitude which impede its progress The distance from the high road to the Fall is about two miles and the river is crossed and re crossed more than twenty times The Fall is formed by the junction at its head of the Cane and Lucky Valley rivers which unite within a hundred yards of the spot from whence they are precipitated into the gulph beneath from a height of somewhat more than 200 feet The road is tolerably good having been formed with much labour for the traffic of the mules for the supply and convenience of the estates and coffee mountains which abound in its neighbourhood 1 For this purpose the rocks have been in two instances pierced one of which is seen in the annexed Plate and give a good miniature resemblance of the celebrated galleries of the Simplon Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by Sutherland Holland Estate St Thomas in the East The property of G W Taylor Esqe M P Published Aug 1 1825 by Hurst Robinson Co 90 Cheapside E Lloyd Harley Street HOLLAND ESTATE ST THOMAS IN THE EAST Holland Estate in St Thomas in the East the property of George Watson Taylor Esq M P occupies a very great portion of the easternmost extremity of the valley of Plantain Garden River The works are situated on the northern bank of the stream and give employ to upwards of six hundred negroes who are now settled on the sea shore in a village recently erected at a very great expense Although the situation of the former settlement was known and felt by the negroes themselves to be unhealthy so great was their attachment to it that no persuasion could induce them to abandon it Fortunately the elements came in aid of the efforts of the proprietor A flood unusual in extent even where floods are far from uncommon cleared the village of its inhabitants who took up with their new and much more commodious habitations merely as temporary residences till the effects of the partial deluge should have passed away A few weeks however reconciled them to their new abode The greater convenience was every day more apparent and they remained contentedly in a spot to which probably nothing short of the accidental circumstance above mentioned could have driven them The family of Taylor was originally of Norman extraction and settled in Scotland early in the fourteenth century acquiring lands at Burrowfield near Montrose The first we find on record is Robert Tailzour of Tailzourtown who married Mary daughter of Sir Alexander Strachan Bart Approaching our own time Patrick Tailzour Esq settled in Jamaica and married Martha daughter of George Taylor Esq of Camanas in that Island upon which marriage he assumed the name of Taylor by whom he had two sons and four daughters John the second son was created a Baronet on the 25th July 1778 The elder son Simon died unmarried and his estates descended to his nephew Sir Simon upon whose death without children the whole centred in George Watson Taylor Esq only son of G Watson Esq of Saul s River Jamaica in right of his wife Anne Susanna eldest sister of Sir Simon and sole heiress of her uncle The original family estate is Lyssons near Port Morant to which Mr Simon Taylor added Holland Llanrumney in St Mary s with the pens of Montrose and Flint River The estates of Haughton Court and Haughton Grove were the patrimony of the late Lady Taylor widow of Sir John descended from a younger branch of the ancient family of Haughton of Lancashire Baronets Mr Simon Taylor was educated at Eton and going early in life to visit his patrimonial estates in Jamaica engaged actively in the public concerns of the Island aud continued his residence there during the remainder of his life making only one visit to England when he was received by Mr Pitt the Minister with marked consideration and was introduced to His Majesty George III The view before us presents the approach to the works from the South On the left is the Barrack or residence of the book keepers and other white people attached to the estate beyond which is the boiling house and still house On the right is the overseer s house and in the distance upon the hill is the change of air house for the use of convalescents on the estate Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by Sutherland Golden Vale Portland Published April 1 1824 by Hurst Robinson Co 90 Cheapside E Lloyd Harley Street VIEW FROM SPRING BANK NEAR PORT ANTONIO Spring Bank was at the time this view was taken the property and residence of John Steel Esq It is situated at an immense elevation about three miles south westward of Port Antonio and commands the most extensive and varied landscape scenery This view which is terminated southerly by some of the highest of the Blue Mountains includes in the valley along which the Rio Grande has its impetuous course the Golden Vale and Seaman s Valley estates with some small portions of Stanton Harcourt and Hope estates Golden Vale about five miles in the interior from Port Antonio contains about 250 acres of level cane field above and below the works and about as much more bottom land not so convenient for canes which is chiefly in pasturage with a very large extent of hilly and mountainous land to the south westward in pasturage provisions ruinate and wood There are on the estates 500 negroes 50 mules and 300 head of cattle Golden Vale was settled by the late George Paplay Esq about the year 1750 and became afterwards the property of Greenwich Hospital from which it was purchased in 1811 by Alexander Kinloch and John Steel Esqrs with only 140 negroes which have been brought up by subsequent purchases to their present number Its annual crops are about 300 hogsheads of sugar and about half that number of puncheons of rum William Lambie Esq attorney Seaman s Valley is said to derive its name from the destruction of a party of our seamen by the Maroons It is about ten miles from Port Antonio and contains 1693 acres of which 187 are in canes 158 in guinea grass and pastures the remainder in provision grounds wood lands river courses c The cane land is loamy and productive yielding in most instances two hogsheads per acre Seaman s Valley was for many years in the possession of Messrs Daniel and Richard Shaw from whom it passed in the year 1813 to Messrs Gray Whitworth and Gillbee merchants of London with 172 negroes to this strength an addition has since been made and there are now 291 on the estate Maurice Jones Esq attorney At the head of the Valley is Moor Town one of the stations of the Maroons It contains 80 men 127 women and 202 children under the superintendence of George Fuller Esq The elevation of the Blue Mountains according to the observations of Dr Cowan of Falmouth is as follows Manchester Rest 5 050 East Peak 5 670 North Peak 5 900 West Peak 5 680 feet above the sea Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by Sutherland Spring Garden Estate St George s The property of I R Grosett Esquire M P Published Apr 1 1824 by Hurst Robinson Co 90 Cheapside E Lloyd Harley Street SPRING GARDEN ESTATE ST GEORGE S Spring Garden Estate frequently called Great Spring Garden is one of the properties of John Rock Grosett Esq M P to whom it has descended from his great grandfather the original settler The law of entail in Jamaica is much the same as in England but in the former country entails are barred by deeds of lease and release and not by fine or recovery This plantation is contiguous to the sea shore and adjoins the left bank of the Spanish river The mansion house or according to local phraseology the great house is placed on a rising ground and judiciously overlooks the works which are extensive and in the most complete repair the mill is turned by a well supplied water wheel and the boiling house contains a double and single set of coppers The overseer s house and offices the hospital and a building for the negro children are severally large and well adapted for their purposes Between these and the great house at the foot of the knoll on which the latter stands is seen a portion of the negro village which embraces however in its whole circuit an area of nearly thirty acres Beyond these the eye rests on the blue expanse of Buff Bay closed in by Palmetto Point towards the sea and inland by that portion of a range of the Blue Mountains which run north and south or nearly at right angles with the principal range which cross the southward side of this parish A regularly bred surgeon resides on the estate who was sent out by the present proprietor and whose practice is exclusively directed to the property This plan has been adopted by other proprietors and would doubtless be more general if the planters were not prevented from extending their improvements by the distressing circumstances of the times and the continual low sale of their produce This estate contains nearly three thousand acres of land of which five hundred and eighty are in cane cultivation of plants and ratoons On it are six hundred negroes many of them settled on it from father to son and who regard their houses and provision grounds of which they have between three and four hundred acres as an inheritance the possession of which they enjoy with uninterrupted security With their surplus produce and their pigs and poultry they supply even to the distance of Anotto Bay and from this traffic derive a very considerable profit A good private wharf with a large store as seen in the view is an useful acquisition to this estate for the conveniency of shipping its produce which from thence as well as from the neighbouring plantations is generally conveyed in small craft called droggers to the ships which lie for anchorage to the eastward off Port Antonio Mr Grosett is also proprietor of Petersfield estate in St Thomas s in the East and of various premises and lands at Morant Bay and of the principal public wharf there at which an iron railway has been laid down for the convenience of transporting goods c He is also proprietor of Chepstow Coffee plantation and pen and of two or three other minor properties On the morning of the 12th of January 1821 when the author was residing at Spring Garden the mill yard was suddenly filled with sailors They were the crew of the ship Birch Captain M c Intosh burthen 454 tons which was entirely wrecked on the morning of the 9th abreast of Fair Prospect estate in Manchioneal about four miles to the eastward of the N E point Providentially no lives were lost Immediate assistance and accommodation was afforded by Mr Gillchrist the overseer of Fair Prospect The passengers were afterwards removed to Castle Comfort no bad name for the place at any time but particularly at the present moment where they were hospitably entertained by Mr and Mrs Orr The crew consisting of twenty five men proceeded for their original destination and halted at Spring Garden for breakfast which was speedily and largely provided for them In this way without expense and meeting at every halt with the most active sympathy they reached Montego Bay a distance of about 150 miles Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by D T Egerton Monument of the late Thos Hibbert Esqr at Agualta Vale St Mary s Published Apr 1 1824 by Hurst Robinson Co 90 Cheapside E Lloyd Harley Street London MONUMENT OF THE LATE THOMAS HIBBERT ESQ AT AGUALTA VALE PENN ST MARY S The annexed View represents the Monument of the late Thomas Hibbert Esq erected on the summit of an eminence which besides the pleasure it gave to the proprietor in affording him a commanding view of the penn on which it is situated and on either hand the works and cane fields of Agualta Vale and Orange Hill Sugar Estates opened likewise to the south east the buildings of the penn and the winding course of the Agualta River immediately beneath his eye onward the beautiful sweeping line of Anotto Bay and Town the buildings of Gibraltar and Gray Inn Estates and the distant high lands of St George s The plate before us embraces these interesting objects On this spot as having yielded him many a happy moment in the reflection of an amiable mind surveying his own creation of wealth and independence for a long inheritance he desired that his remains should be placed He died on the 20th of May 1780 aged 71 years This tribute to the dead no church s care Nor solemn sprinkling boasts nor prelate s prayer But rites more sacred sanctify the dust Where rest revered the reliques of the just Prayers from the poor which sooner reach the sky And holier drops which fall from friendship s eye Mr Hibbert arrived in Jamaica in 1734 and soon became one of the principal and most opulent merchants in Kingston where he erected the very handsome house in Duke Street late the residence of the Commander in Chief of the Forces and still known as Hibbert s House Agualta Vale containing about 3000 acres was purchased from the heir of Mr Bendish about the year 1760 part of it was in coffee but by far the larger portion in wood and pasture The sugar estate formed out of a part of it was settled in 1771 and the coffee abandoned while a large breeding penn was established in place of it Orange Hill was a small sugar estate joining line and line with Agualta Vale almost in ruins and had been the property of William Beckford Ellis Esq It was sold by a decree of the Court of Chancery and purchased and in a manner resettled by Mr Hibbert These estates are at present the property of Thomas Hibbert Esq nephew to the original settler Upon them are 896 negroes and 633 head of cattle The family of Hibbert possess very extensive property in other parts of the island as Georgia in Hanover belonging to Robert Hibbert Esq of East Hyde Bedfordshire the Valleys in Hanover and Albion in St Thomas in the East the property of Robert Hibbert Esq of Birtles in Cheshire These gentlemen as well as George Hibbert Esq to whom the agency of the island is confided at home are nephews of the original settler of Agualta Vale Estates Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by Sutherland Bridge over the White River St Mary s Published May 1 1825 by Hurst Robinson Co 90 Cheapside Lloyd Harley Street London BRIDGE OVER THE WHITE RIVER ST MARY S The White River rises on the North side of the parish of St Thomas in the Vale and its course in its greatest length forms the boundary line between the parishes of St Mary and St Ann Passing Whitehall Spring Garden Halifax and Goshen estates it is crossed near Davies s by the bridge in the annexed Plate it then passes Industry and falls into the sea at White River Bay about midway between Rio Novo and Ocho Rios Bay About twelve miles from its source in the mountains the river precipitates itself in a fall of nearly three hundred feet obliquely measured So vast a discharge of water dashing and foaming from step to step with all the impetuosity and rage peculiar to that element exhibits an awful and pleasing scene But the grandeur of it is astonishingly heightened by the supplies it receives in the rainy seasons then Down it comes From the rude mountain and the mossy wild Tumbling through rocks abrupt and sounding far Then o er the sanded valley floating spreads Calm sluggish silent till again constrained Between two meeting crags it bursts away Where rocks and woods o erhang the turbid stream There gathering triple force rapid and deep It boils and wheels and foams and thunders through Nearly the whole parish of St Mary is composed of hill mountain dale and valley The soil is in general a stiff clay in the higher grounds and a considerable depth of rich black vegetable mould in the lower It is universally fertile the hills and mountains clothed with noble woods full of the finest and largest timber trees and every spot is adapted to cultivation except that the summits of some are thought too bleak and chilly for the sugar cane The water is of extraordinary purity and wholesomeness and the air is in general extremely healthful and agreeable to European constitutions The annexed View on the River has been selected not more on account of its pleasing sylvan character the Bridge being seen through its elegant frame of bamboos and backed by mountains clothed with the richest forests than from its well known form being so indelibly fixed on the memory of every one who has visited the North side Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by Clarke Port Maria St Mary s Published Aug 1 1825 by Hurst Robinson Co 90 Cheapside E Lloyd Harley Street PORT MARIA ST MARY S Port Maria the principal town of the parish of St Mary on the north side of the island is famous for having given as it is supposed an asylum to Columbus when his ship was foundering and somewhere hereabouts authors have placed the town of Melilla the first which the Spaniards founded The neighbouring port of Rio Nuevo is likewise remarkable for the decisive victory gained there by General D Oyley over the Spaniards which confirmed the English in the possession of the island The coast differs greatly from that of the south side being for the most part iron bound or protected from the fury of the north winds and the surges of the sea by a wall of rocks The weather of this parish is extremely wet during great part of the year and so cold that few if any of the houses are unfurnished with a chimney The land in general from its richness bears a very luxuriant cane some of which grow to an enormous size but are unfit for making sugar and are only grown for the still house The greater part of the land on which the town of Port Maria is built is the property of C N Bayly Esq as was likewise the ground on which the Court house has lately been erected but for which an exchange was made by the parish for other lands which are now attached to Trinity Estate The view before us embraces on the left the New Court house erected 1821 and Fort Haldane and the Barracks on the point an eminence which commands the entrance of the harbour The houses stretch along the seashore at a short distance from which is Cabarita Island On the right are the works and negro houses of Frontier Estate the property of A Stirling Esq GENERAL EXPORTS from Port Maria between the 29th of September 1820 and the 29th of September 1821 Tonnage 9 036 Sugar Rum Molasses Coffee Pimento Hhds 8 124 Trs 172 Bbrs 24 Puns 4 275 Hhds 15 Casks 4 Lbs 460 464 Casks 33 Bags 2 693 Indigo Hides Logwood Fustic Nica wood Lignum Mahogany Lance wood Seroons 5 No 230 Tons 55 Tons 49 Tons 3 Tons 20 Logs 12 Spars 500 Drawn by James Hakewill Engraved by Sutherland Trinity Estate St Mary s Published June 1 1824 by Hurst Robinson Co 90 Cheapside E Lloyd Harley Street TRINITY ESTATE ST MARY S THE PROPERTY OF C N BAYLY ESQ Trinity Tryall Brimmer Hall

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Picturesque_Tour_of_the_Island_of_Jamaica (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • James Hakewill - Wikisource, the free online library
    attributed Works on this author edit Hakewill James in Dictionary of National Biography London Smith Elder Co 1885 1900 in 63 vols Works by this author published before January 1 1923 are in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago Translations or editions published later may be copyrighted Posthumous works may be copyrighted based on how long they have been published in certain countries and areas Public domain Public domain false false Authority control VIAF 3575240 LCCN nr92028794 ISNI 0000 0000 6685 2936 GND 130254959 SELIBR 314309 SUDOC 152808116 ULAN 500014401 NLA 35649117 NLI 000526545 Open Library OL2388290A ODNB 101011888 English Wikisource 1343124 WorldCat Retrieved from https en wikisource org w index php title Author James Hakewill oldid 5658005 Categories Authors Ha 1778 births Early modern authors 1843 deaths Male authors Author PD old British authors Architects Hidden categories Author pages without image Author pages with gender in Wikidata Author pages connected to Wikidata Author pages with authority control data Pages using authority control with parameters Author pages with VIAF on Wikidata Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in Namespaces Author Discussion Variants Views Read Edit View history

    Original URL path: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:James_Hakewill (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •