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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    we got to Arkansas I think The porter could probably tell that I was very naive and had never traveled anywhere and he said Well I would just like for you to get off when we get to Little Rock or wherever it was and just go up into the waiting room and just see what it was like And so I was elated and very happy and so my friends the two white girls we all went up and we were getting ready to go through the door and all of a sudden I looked up and I saw that sign and it was just like a bomb exploded I ll never forget it It said White Only and I just took off and ran all the way back to the train Upon her arrival at Lackland Thomas became the first black person to be integrated into a basic training squadron Up to that time training squadrons had been segregated When the Korean War broke out in 1950 Thomas volunteered to go to Japan Life in Tokyo was far from spartan The WAF Women in the Air Force lived in the Mitsubishi Building in Tokyo and had maid service table cloths candlelight and gourmet food Thomas liked her work as a clerk typist in the intelligence section but became upset when a male private was promoted ahead of her despite her seniority She complained to her supervisor a master sergeant I told him I had been here longer and I wanted to know why I had not been promoted and he said well perhaps I would go in the next time I said Well then I m not going to work here anymore He said I didn t have a choice and I said I did So I went

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/Oral_History/ohjohnson.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    very tiny just tore into this authoritarian judge His is one of those stories that sort of got me into the military Here is a man who fought for his country but was treated poorly when he got back I suspect some of this had to do with racism Is your family traditional My grandmother who was Lumbee was traditional She was a spirited woman when she was young She could not read or write and that had mostly to do with the segregation laws in the south in the early part of the 1910s and 1920s She lived the history of the Lumbee people during that time frame the segregation the inability to go to the schools you wanted to Many people understand segregation in terms of black and white but in North Carolina there was a third racial category and that was the Indian people They would literally have a drinking fountain for blacks a drinking fountain for whites and then there was the drinking fountain for Indian people Those stories were told to me early on One of the traditions of the Lumbee people is to go back and visit and keep in contact with the family She would go down with my mother and they would take the bus back down to North Carolina and they would get off at a stop and the people would go in to eat and she and grandma would stay on the bus because they were not allowed to go in and eat People would bring food out to them To my mother this was just a fact of life I say Don t you realize what was happening She says At the time no That s just the way it was Now I realize we weren t allowed to go into those places My grandmother always missed North Carolina Many Lumbee people always go back or they just never leave She called it getting back home Those are the kind of things we call traditional We ve lost our language a lot of the pre European traditions are gone but there is a community sense that is still very much part of the tradition And that was instilled into me Some of the stories the struggle of the Lumbee people that s really our history mostly struggle and standing up to oppression which is part of that story of my grandmother facing that white judge and tearing into him in spite of the fact he had all this power and she had none That s typical Lumbee tradition no matter what the odds are you stand up for yourself and fight The story is told with pride because it s about my little illiterate grandmother standing up to this white judge That s the way she was But because I didn t grow up in North Carolina there were a lot of things I missed What was your parents view when you decided you wanted to join the military

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/Oral_History/ohfinnicum.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    flag She came from a family of four women military veterans but no one told her about them until after she enlisted in the Air Force in 1991 After her military service Iva became a founder of the first chartered all woman American Legion Post in the nation and serves as the first female Native commander She is using her military benefits to continue her college education and she counsels young people about the military Volunteering in the military My mother didn t accept that I was going into the Air Force until she realized I was actually leaving She was sad which was understandable But I couldn t tell when I called home during basic training She was extremely strong all the way through It took longer for the males in my family to accept it and it took even longer for the males in the general population here Native tradition My upbringing was a spiritual upbringing I was taught there were values at an early age honesty and integrity and that helped shape us as we got older I never felt uncomfortable about my gender or my nationality but I believe the men have stereotypes about the women

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/Oral_History/ohflute.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    to be detached and go to Paris and I was one of the ten sent We arrived in a tent hospital in the Bois de Boulogne I never saw so much blood in my life It was just terrible and it needed cleaning up terribly which they had us do After a week we finally got to another tent hospital and we were really as close as nurses get to the front and all the front line dressings came to our tent hospital Interview Cazenove Lamar Miller Helm interviewed by Mrs John D Capers Augusta GA 20 April 1981 NSCD Collection tape and transcript deposited at the Women s Memorial Foundation Inc Arlington VA MAJ Ladda Tammy Duckworth USAR Women s Memorial Veterans Day Observance Nov 11 2005 Photograph by Donna Parry I was just headed back home and we happened to fly over a nest of insurgents And they shot everything they had into the air with small arms fire and RPGs we were flying along and I heard the tap tap tap on the fuselage I knew we had taken some small arms fire hits I turned to the pilot in command Of course I swore and cursed

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/Oral_History/ohservicesacrifice.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    you like drilling Concentrate on collecting nitty gritty information and personal feelings For example if you d like your interviewee to describe her uniform you might ask Was it comfortable How did you feel wearing it Military quarters How much space did you have to store your belongings Her regular routine Describe a typical day Describe your shift responsibilities Elaborate upon her answers and gather her reaction to various types

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/Oral_History/ohtalkabout.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    What do I do if my subject seems nervous Spend a few minutes chatting with your subject before you turn on the recorder Don t actually start the interview just make conversation until you sense that she has relaxed What do I do if the conversation goes off on a tangent Don t worry if your subject s mind wanders a bit and if you find yourself encouraging her Sometimes that s how you get the best information If the discussion digresses too far from the interview topic just ask a question from your list How do I handle interviewing an elderly person Because elderly people sometimes have a hard time hearing they often try reading the face and lips of their interviewer to get a better sense of what was just said Speak loud enough to be heard and slowly enough to be understood What should I do if my interviewee doesn t want to answer a question Try asking the question again in another way later in the interview If a World War II era interviewee for example says the bare minimum about blackout restrictions come back to the topic later by saying Tell me more about the

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/Oral_History/ohinterview.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    Kimberly Voelz USA Captain Kimberly N Hampton USA Sergeant Keicia M Hines USA Private First Class Holly J McGeogh USA Private First Class Nichole M Frye USA Captain Gussie M Jones USA Specialist Tyanna S Avery Felder USA Specialist Michelle M Witmer USA Specialist Isela Rubalcava USA Private First Class Leslie D Jackson USA Private First Class Melissa J Hobart USA Sergeant First Class Linda Ann Tarango Griess USA Sergeant Tatjana Reed USA Sergeant Shawna M Morrison IL ARNG Sergeant Gina R Sparks USA Specialist Jessica L Cawvey IL ARNG Sergeant Pamela G Osbourne USA Sergeant Cari A Gasiewicz USA Sergeant Tina S Time USAR Sergeant Jessica M Housby IL ARNG Specialist Katrina L Bell Johnson USA Specialist Lizbeth Robles USA Specialist Adriana N Salem USA Specialist Aleina Ramirez Gonzalez USA Private First Class Sam W Huff USA Specialist Carrie L French ID ARNG Lance Corporal Holly A Charette USMC Corporal Ramona M Valdez USMC Petty Officer 1st Class Regina R Clark USN Sergeant First Class Tricia L Jameson NE ARNG Private First Class Lavena Lynn Johnson USA Specialist Toccara R Green USA Airman First Class Elizabeth N Jacobson USAF First Lieutenant Debra A Banaszak MO ARNG Sergeant Julia V Atkins USA Sergeant Regina C Reali USAR Sergeant Myla L Maravillosa USA First Lieutenant Jaime L Campbell AK ARNG Private First Class Tina M Priest USA Private First Class Amy A Duerksen USA Sergeant Amanda N Pinson USA Lance Corporal Juana NavarroArellano USMC Petty Officer 2nd Class Jaime S Jaenke USN Private First Class Hannah L McKinney USA Second Lieutenant Emily J T Perez USA Sergeant Jennifer M Hartman USA First Lieutenant Ashley L Henderson Huff USA Sergeant Denise A Lannaman NY ARNG Sergeant Jeannette T Dunn USA Major Megan M McClung USMC Major Gloria D Davis USA Seaman Sandra S Grant USN Senior Airman Elizabeth A Loncki USAF Petty Officer 1st Class Jennifer A Valdivia USN Command Sergeant Major Marilyn L Gabbard IA ARNG Specialist Carla J Stewart CA ARNG Corporal Jennifer M Parcell USMC Captain Jennifer J Harris USMC Sergeant Ashly L Moyer USA Private First Class Katie M Soenksen USA Specialist Karen N Clifton USA Sergeant Trista L Moretti USA Specialist Michelle R Ring USA Captain Maria I Ortiz USA Staff Sergeant Alicia A Birchett USA Sergeant Princess C Samuels USA Specialist Zandra T Walker USA Specialist Kamisha J Block USA Specialist Marisol Heredia USA Captain Dr Roselle M Hoffmaster USA Seaman Apprentice Shayna Ann Schnell USN Specialist Rachael L Hugo USAR Staff Sergeant Lillian Clamens USAR Seaman Anamarie Sannicolas Camacho USN Seaman Genesia Mattril Gresham USN Second Lieutenant Tracy Lynn Alger USA Staff Sergeant Carletta S Davis USA Specialist Christine M Ndururi USA Specialist Ashley Sietsema IL ARNG Sergeant Tracy R Birkman USA Specialist Keisha M Morgan USA Petty Officer 1st Class Cherie L Mortan USN Lance Corporal Casey L Casanova USMC Specialist Mary J Jaenichen USA Corporal Jessica A Ellis USA Technical Sergeant Jackie L Larsen USAF Private First Class Jennifer L Cole USA Private

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/WHM11Tribute.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    among others they tell the story of today s military women Table top display featuring artifacts donated by women serving in the Global War on Terror Women s Memorial Foundation Photo Located in exhibit alcoves on each side of the Great Niche a combination of information panels images and excerpts from oral histories along with uniform displays and table top exhibits that house some of the many unique artifacts received make this powerful exhibit come to life for visitors Focusing on three primary areas daily life work and combat visitors learn about individual servicewomen s experiences in theater including women like Army SGT Valerie Dorsey Recounting her time in Iraq SGT Dorsey said I am a female paratrooper a noncommissioned officer a leader of soldiers My main mission is to train and lead soldiers into combat not just on the battlefield but in their daily lives as well I am the mother the sister and mentor to my soldiers The Global War on Terror exhibit includes an American flag carried by women pilots on board US military aircraft during three separate combat missions in Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom Women s Memorial Foundation Photo Artifacts used in the exhibit range from military issue Bibles to campaign medals and polarized goggles to a deck of cards featuring photos of insurgents used for quick identification by US security troops Also numerous items representing the local culture have been donated including an Afghani prayer rug and keepsakes from local bazaars Other items highlight some of the new roles of women in war including combat flight Standing against a backdrop of mosquito netting used in the region is an American flag that was carried by women pilots on board US aircraft during three separate combat missions in honor of all women of the US

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/WHM11GWOT.html (2016-02-09)
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