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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    and in schools the Education Task Force of the Sonoma County CA Commission on the Status of Women initiated a Women s History Week celebration in 1978 The Commission chose the week of March 8 in order to focus its observance around International Women s Day Within a few years a Congressional Resolution declared National Women s History Week making the annual celebration a national observance These early women s

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/WHM11Why.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    Evacuation Hospital No 114 Fleury sur Aire France World War I National Archives 111 SC 26535 Spc 5 Karen Hampton U S Army 1970s Spc 5 Karen Sellers Hampton was the first woman selected as a demonstration jumper on the U S Army Parachute Team The Golden Knights 1979 1980 Women s Memorial Foundation Register Women in the Civil War Volunteer Unit Civil War Unidentified women s volunteer unit Washington D C Civil War National Archives 64 M 306 SPAR Clerk U S Coast Guard World War II Coast Guard SPAR clerk June 1944 Some 11 000 women answered their country s call to serve in the Coast Guard during World War II 10 000 in its enlisted ranks and 1 000 in the officer corps USCG photo Women s Memorial Foundation Collection 2nd Lt Emily Perez U S Army Operation Iraqi Freedom 2nd Lt Emily J Perez a 2005 United States Military Academy graduate deployed to Iraq in December 2005 with the Army s 204th Support Battalion 2nd Brigade 4th Infantry out of Fort Hood Texas On Sept 12 2006 she was killed when an improvised explosive device detonated near her Humvee in Al Kifl Iraq Women s Memorial Foundation Collection Staff Sgt Eugenia Lopez U S Air Force Operation Iraqi Freedom Staff Sgt Eugenia Lopez monitors equipment in the central radar approach control facility Kirkuk Air Base Iraq Operation Iraqi Freedom December 2003 USAF photo by Airman 1st Class Alicia Sarkkinen Lt Melanie Knight U S Navy 1990s Lt Melanie Knight a Navy diver with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 3 signals as she surfaces following a practice dive Naval Air Station San Diego Calif May 1993 Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Andrew C Heuer USN Military Policewoman U S Army 1970s An Army military policewoman directs a convoy of armored vehicles December 1978 USA photo Col Eileen Collins U S Air Force and NASA Astronaut 1990s Col Eileen M Collins became a NASA astronaut in July 1991 and is a veteran of four space flights logging over 872 hours in space In 1995 she became the first woman pilot of a space shuttle on STS 63 Discovery and in 1999 she became the first woman to command a shuttle mission on STS 93 Columbia NASA photo Molly Pitcher American Revolution Currier Ives lithograph The Women of 76 Molly Pitcher The Heroine of Monmouth At the battle of Monmouth in 1778 Molly Pitcher so named because she brought pitchers of water to soldiers on the field became the second known woman to man a gun when her husband fell in battle For her heroic role Gen Washington awarded her a warrant as a noncommissioned officer Library of Congress LC USZC2 3186 Petty Officer 3rd Class Terry Ann Gregory U S Coast Guard 1990s Petty Officer 3rd Class Terry Ann Gregory U S Coast Guard Miami Fla June 1999 USCG photo Capt Bettie Vierra U S Air Force Nurse Corps Vietnam Capt Bettie J Vierra Air Force Nurse

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/WHM11ThumbnailSketches.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    s tent city in Kuwait Vega and her team hit the ground running RAID IV members were broken off into smaller teams of two to be imbedded with the Army s Redeployment Support Team RST After we split off by twos to go with the Army we spent the entire time FOB forward operating base hopping says MST2 Vega one of only two women on RAID Team IV and the only woman from the team to be assigned an RST We hopped from base to base continuing until the entire 3rd Infantry Division was out of Iraq The Mission HAZMAT Inspections and Training Staying no more than 10 days at any FOB the RST conducted HAZMAT field inspections of containers and vehicles which the Army calls rolling stock and made on the spot corrections of hazardous conditions all in an effort to get troops and their equipment out of Iraq and often ahead of schedule Her brief stays at each FOB also included critical field training for Army transportation officers so that the Army could learn proper labeling segregation loading and bracing procedures to ensure that transportation of HAZMAT complied with US international and Army transportation laws and regulations At the end of five months MST2 Vega and her team completed the inspection of 2 000 freight containers and 8 100 pieces of rolling stock and they conducted training for more than 60 major Army units all of which greatly reduced the delay of containerized military cargo and significantly enhanced the movement of these vital military assets and troops on their way home MST2 Vega back row third from left and RST members at the famous Crossed Sabers in the park Baghdad Iraq 2006 Photo courtesy of MST1 Sarah Vega MST2 Vega at the Sabers Baghdad Iraq 2006 Photo courtesy of MST1 Sarah Vega Despite the in and out nature of her mission in Iraq MST2 Vega s deployment was by no means easy or safe She spent many a night sleeping on little more than a cot or a makeshift bed in the Army s temporary housing that included abandoned warehouses trailers and even some residences and palaces that once belonged to Saddam Hussein The now 27 year old Vega says she learned to travel light because she had to carry all of her belongings from base to base When you carry everything you own on your back you learn not to bring much with you she says Dangerous Duty The very nature of FOB hopping made her assignment particularly dangerous Because of the RST s constant movement and transferring personnel between units Petty Officer Vega and her team faced constant threat of insurgent attacks It seemed like the mortar rounds followed us from base to base she recalls One night I was blown clear out of my rack bed when the base got hit by mortar rounds And traveling between units was never easy Often we d get into a HMMWV for a convoy but as we were

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/WHM08KitUSCG.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    ideal conditions and the conditions and the aircraft were less than ideal that day As a seasoned pilot Capt Campbell knew well that few pilots had ever attempted and fewer still had survived uninjured a manual landing of such a severely damaged Warthog Yet she remained confident she says because of her training and the faith she still has in the durable and reliable A 10 as well as the reassurance she received from a skilled and directive flight lead Lt Col Richard Bino Turner flying at her wing That faith and her skill carried the A 10 within sight of home Then as the Warthog crossed the landing threshold it started to roll quickly to the left Capt Campbell s split second counteraction righted the roll and she executed a nearly perfect landing employing emergency braking techniques to bring the damaged A 10 to a stop Capt Kim Campbell left and Lt Col Richard Bino Turner the A 10 squadron commander and flight lead who helped guide her back to base during the harrowing flight on April 7 2003 Photo Courtesy of Maj Kim Campbell All Three Wheels Hit the Ground When all three wheels hit the ground it was an amazing feeling of relief she recalled in 2004 The next day Capt Campbell was back in the cockpit of a new A 10 rushing to provide air cover when a fellow A 10 pilot was forced to eject from his aircraft near the Baghdad airport He was rescued and recovered Capt Campbell wasn t the only one in Iraq who was grateful for her flight and impressed with her ability to bring the devastated aircraft home In addition to receiving the DFC the South Carolina General Assembly adopted a bill to commend Captain Kim Killer Chick Campbell United States Air Force for her tremendous courage tenacity and bravery Notes of Thanks The fighter pilot found even more touching words among notes she received she says Among the many letters she received about the flight was a thank you note which was written on a napkin and addressed to her and her fellow Warthog pilots by the ground troops in Iraq whose calls for fire support she had so often answered When you get a note from somebody saying If you d been a few minutes late I wouldn t be here now that s what it s all about she says These guys on the ground needed our help That s our job to bring fire down on the enemy when our Army and Marine brothers request our assistance the captain told the Smithsonian crowd That job is one that the A 10 pilot has completed often during three deployments in support of Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom including her second in 2003 when she earned the DFC In all MAJ Campbell has flown more than 400 hours in the A 10 including 120 combat hours during the Global War on Terror She is currently stationed along with

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/WHM08KitUSAF.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    made that a life saving mission That life saving flight and the months she served with the Marines as a critical care nurse in the Fallujah Surgical unit in Iraq from August 2006 to March 2007 earned then LT Saar the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal presented April 5 2007 Fallujah Surgical unit personnel Fallujah Iraq 2007 Photo courtesy of LCDR Lisa Saar My hope is that this honor does not present me as a kind of hero but that it can be used as an example to show what every Navy nurse does to show that we care and to show that any Navy nurse would and does sacrifice give anything to save the life of a Marine LCDR Saar adds Today the lieutenant commander is one of the more than 5 000 nurses serving in the US Navy one of more than 150 000 female nurses who have served in the Navy Nurse Corps since the first 20 women entered the Corps 100 years ago on May 13 1908 The Making of a Navy Nurse LCDR Saar s story began in the military family in which the Long Island NY native was raised She became a licensed practical nurse LPN in northeastern Pennsylvania after high school graduation but was inspired to try military service by the example of her father an Air Force veteran A brother and sister followed his example too serving in the Air Force and Navy respectively At 21 Nurse Saar enlisted in the Navy in 1987 I joined the Navy because I like being on the water and like the idea of serving my country and I also liked the educational and life opportunities of the service recalls LCDR Saar who later entered the Navy Nurse Corps through the Medical Enlisting Commissioning Program I m glad that I went the enlistment route because I not only enjoyed my duty I learned a lot from my enlisted experiences which I carry with me with pride Navy surgical nurse LT Lisa Saar Camp Fallujah Iraq 2007 Photo courtesy of LCDR Lisa Saar Three Tours in the Global War on Terror LCDR Saar has served three tours in the Global War on Terror including serving aboard the USNS Comfort in 2003 moored five miles off the Iraqi coast She also served a six month tour at Naval Hospital Guantanamo Bay Cuba During her 21 year Navy career LCDR Saar has also twice been stationed at the National Navy Medical Center Bethesda MD Today she works as an operational bedside nurse and training officer at Naval Hospital Bremerton WA She is also completing her studies for a law degree and hopes to become a nurse attorney and practice health care law after she retires from the Navy All those years of service have each had their share of sacrifices and rewards but that comes with the uniform she adds To be a Navy nurse means some extra sacrifices like being away from family working extra shifts But

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/WHM08KitUSN.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    or their s You ve got a job to do protecting yourself and your fellow comrades The Silver Star Being an American hero isn t something this soldier thinks too much about She says she was surprised and honored when she found out she was being considered for the Silver Star She and two others from her unit were awarded the Silver Star at Camp Liberty Iraq in June 2005 Every member of her squad was honored for heroism in combat which included the award of three Bronze Stars with the Valor device three Army Commendations with the Valor device and four Purple Hearts Although the Nashville resident is modest about her distinction as a hero she does recognize the historical significance of being the first woman soldier to be decorated with the Silver Star since WWII Hester who was recently discharged from the Army is one of only 14 women in US military history to receive the Silver Star and the first as a result of direct combat In addition to six Army nurses in World War I seven Army nurses were decorated for valor for their actions at the 56th Evacuation Hospital and 33rd Field Hospital in Anzio Italy during World War II SGT Leigh Ann Hester reads the information panels accompanying the life size model of herself and other members of Raven 42 at the opening of the Global War on Terrorism Exhibit at the Army Women s Museum Ft Lee VA Feb 3 2007 USA Photo by SSG Jon Sousy Army Women s Museum Honors the Raven 42 Heroes Hester s Silver Star is such an important milestone for America s servicewomen that this soldier has been given a permanent place in the history books and at two institutions that honor America s military women In early 2007 the Army Women s Museum Ft Lee VA unveiled its Global War on Terrorism exhibit in which Hester and other members of her team are depicted in a life size three dimensional model Hester and other Raven 42 members were on hand for the exhibit s unveiling which also features photos of each soldier involved in the now famous battle At the exhibit opening Hester who often downplays her role in the counterattack was quick to emphasize that she and her squad were just doing their jobs that day doing what any soldier would do There are a lot of soldiers who are doing this job right now she says Right this minute right now they re doing now what we were doing then and they re not getting the credit they deserve Look at the big picture We did great one day but there are people doing that every day Don t lose sight of that From left Army LTG Ann Dunwoody Acting Secretary of VA Gordon Mansfield and Defense Secretary Robert Gates unveil the glass tablet bearing a quote by SGT Hester during the 10th Anniversary celebration at the Women s Memorial on Nov 3 2007

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/WHM08KitUSA.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    J McGeogh USA Private First Class Nichole M Frye USA Captain Gussie M Jones USA Specialist Tyanna S Avery Felder USA Specialist Michelle M Witmer USA Specialist Isela Rubalcava USA Private First Class Leslie D Jackson USA Private First Class Melissa J Hobart USA Sergeant First Class Linda Ann Tarango Griess USA Sergeant Tatjana Reed USA Sergeant Shawna M Morrison IL ARNG Specialist Jessica L Cawvey IL ARNG Sergeant Pamela G Osbourne USA Sergeant Cari A Gasiewicz USA Sergeant Tina S Time USAR Sergeant Jessica M Housby IL ARNG Specialist Katrina L Bell Johnson USA Specialist Lizbeth Robles USA Specialist Adriana N Salem USA Specialist Aleina Ramirezgonzalez USA Private First Class Sam W Huff USA Specialist Carrie L French ID ARNG Lance Corporal Holly A Charette USMC Corporal Ramona M Valdez USMC Petty Officer 1st Class Regina R Clark USN Sergeant First Class Tricia L Jameson NE ARNG Private First Class Lavena Lynn Johnson USA Specialist Toccara R Green USA Airman First Class Elizabeth N Jacobson USAF First Lieutenant Debra A Banaszak MO ARNG Sergeant Julia V Atkins USA Sergeant Myla L Maravillosa USA Sergeant Regina C Reali USAR First Lieutenant Jaime L Campbell AK ARNG Private First Class Tina M Priest USA Private First Class Amy A Duerksen USA Sergeant Amanda N Pinson USA Lance Corporal Juana NavarroArellano USMC Petty Officer 2nd Class Jaime S Jaenke USN Private First Class Hannah L McKinney USA Second Lieutenant Emily J T Perez USA Sergeant Jennifer M Hartman USA First Lieutenant Ashley L Henderson Huff USA Lieutenant Commander Jane E Lanham Tafoya USN Sergeant Denise A Lannaman NY ARNG Sergeant Jeannette T Dunn USA Major Megan M McClung USMC Major Gloria D Davis USA Seaman Sandra S Grant USN Senior Airman Elizabeth A Loncki USAF Petty Officer 1st Class Jennifer A Valdivia

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/WHM09Tribute.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    the attacks the Global War on Terror Communication with friends and family was different from previous wars when members of the military relied on snail mail and rare phone calls to keep in touch In the War on Terror Internet e mail and accessible telephone service improved the speed and frequency of communication for many servicewomen This one of a kind online exhibit provides an up close and personal look

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/WHM09Baghdad.html (2016-02-09)
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