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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    LT Jo Oberg s Christmas Letter 1963 Page One Page Two Page Three

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/Collections/doclt1example.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    15 1898 The Treaty of Paris on Dec 10 1898 ended the war and Spain lost its control over the remnants of its overseas empire The Treaty established the independence of Cuba ceded Puerto Rico and Guam to the United States and allowed the United States to purchase the Philippine Islands from Spain for 20 million The war had cost the United States 250 million and nearly 5 500 lives

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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    were required to be over 30 years old matronly in appearance able to pay their own way have two letters of recommendation wear brown or black garments and be sober and self sacrificing They received forty cents a day plus a ration While 500 servedunder Dix another 2 700 provided care to Civil War soldiers during the War In addition to her nursing services Clara Barton began a program for locating those missing in action during the Civil War Others like Clara Barton who later founded the American Red Cross were so moved by the suffering of wounded and sick soldiers that they volunteered at Army camps and hospitals and on battlefields A 39 year old spinster working as a full time copyist at the US Patent Office in Washington DC Barton had no formal nurses training but wanted to ease the suffering of Northern troops Using her own money to purchase food and collecting hospital supplies medicine and even whisky Barton nursed Union soldiers at local military hospitals before obtaining passes to venture onto the battlefields of Marye s Heights the Wilderness Campaign Hilton Head and Battery Wagner Read more about Clara Barton founder of the American Red Cross Catholic nuns also served as nurses for both the North and South in hospitals and aboard steamships In the beginning they were the only source of trained nurses male or female because of their education and training in 28 already established Catholic hospitals Nine nuns are known to have died in war service Women in the South did not have to leave their homes to reach the front The war fought in large part in the Confederacy confronted many right on their own doorsteps An estimated 1 000 southern women nursed in hospitals Countless others nursed the sick and wounded

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/History/earlyyears%28civil%29.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    than the war itself 379 American men died in combat yet nearly 5 000 succumbed to pneumonia typhoid malaria and yellow fever Nurses on the home front in Georgia care for convalescents The United States military was ill prepared for the medical emergencies of tropical warfare and the need for trained medical personnel was urgent The obvious solution to the military s need was to contract trained female nurses for

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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    war bond drives and official military functions to inspire patriotism and rally public support Most Yeomen F filled administrative secretarial and clerical positions often working ten hours a day six days a week Although they frequently described their jobs as boring and monotonous they kept men and supplies moving in support of the war As war became imminent Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels realizing that the Navy would be shorthanded deftly avoided the need for congressional approval to enlist women by pointing out that the Naval Act of 1916 did not actually specify that yeomen must be men it called for persons He ordered his Navy and Marine Corps leaders to enlist women into the reserve ranks and thousands of qualified women rushed to sign up More than 12 000 served as Yeomen F from 1917 through 1921 The Marine Corps enlisted 305 women for clerical duties The Navy Department already had hundreds of women clerical workers but needed more As enlistees women yeomen could be trained quickly for specific jobs and sent where needed to fill a variety of posts Most Yeomen F traded protected comfortable environments for spare crowded living quarters and for the same strict discipline

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/History/wwi%28yeomanf%29.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    the British Expeditionary Forces In Oct 1917 they began serving with the American Expeditionary Forces They served in France Belgium England Siberia Italy Serbia Hawaii Puerto Rico and the Philippines They worked in field hospitals mobile units evacuation camps and convalescent hospitals as well as on troop trains and transport ships Introduction to a World War I diary View larger image The Navy Nurse Corps founded in 1908 grew from 406 to 1 536 members who served stateside and in the Philippines Guam Samoa Haiti and the Virgin Islands More than 325 served in Europe in field hospitals on troop transports and on loan to Army Nurse Corps units Thirty six died and three among them were posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for service during the influenza epidemic Instructions for making and applying bandages View larger image War service was hard uncomfortable and heartbreaking Overseas the nurses faced raw cold weather and shortages of water for bathing and laundry long hours at work and little privacy or time off They treated shrapnel wounds infections mustard gas burns exposure and medical and emotional trauma Future Chief Nurse of the Army Nurse Corps Julia Stimson described a scene at Rouen France in

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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    July 1943 a new congressional bill transformed the WAAC to the Women s Army Corps WAC giving Army women military status WAC training class at Ft Des Moines IA The Army opened five WAAC WAC training centers and in July 1942 the first group of 440 women officer candidates 40 of whom were African American and 330 enlisted women began training at Ft Des Moines IA Uniform supply was inadequate but it did not deter training Except for weapons and tactical training the women s courses paralleled those for Army men as did their training circumstances One WAC later remembered her basic training Falling out for reveille at 6 00 AM in the dark below zero weather in deep snow the oversized man s GI overcoat which I wore over a thin fatigue dress a typical sad sack GI shivering with a coat dragging in the snow Uniform distribution at Ft Des Moines IA One officer wrote We went through Officer Candidate School in tennis shoes foundation garments seersucker dresses with bloomers and gas masks Apparently there was a supply mix up somewhere in the pipe line The overconcern with underwear by the male planners paid dividends But they were not pink with lace They were tannish and awful Foundation garments such as even our grandmothers would not have worn did give us moments of hilarious parading in our barracks after the study hour In late 1942 WAACs began deploying overseas Five WAAC officers had a harrowing experience en route to reporting for duty at Allied Headquarters in Algiers North Africa The troop ship on which they traveled from England to North Africa was torpedoed by a German U boat in the North Atlantic A British destroyer came to the rescue and saved the women officers and other survivors of

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/History/wwii%28wac%29.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Women In Military Service For America Memorial
    years in New Jersey health and welfare work MAJ Streeter had never before held a paying job Her matronly dignified demeanor allayed the fears of parents hesitant to entrust their daughters to the Marine Corps In the beginning some of the volunteers may have longed for home Training for the WRs took place at Camp Lejeune NC but the change from civilians to Marines began long before their arrival Recruits traveled to Wilmington NC on troop trains of about 500 At the depot they were lined up issued paper armbands identifying them as boots trainees and ordered to pick up luggage anybody s luggage and marched aboard another train At the other end shouting drill instructors herded them to austere barracks with large open squadbays group shower rooms male urinals and toilet stalls without doors No time was allowed for adjustment A few wondered what they had done and why they had done it Women Reservists arrive in the territory of Hawaii then considered an overseas post Nonetheless WRs were protected according to the customs of the day The Marine Corps renowned for excellent discipline and morale had no history to help them bridge the gender gap Women Marines were not pliant teenagers but rather adults at least twenty years old most with work experience some married some had children and a few had grandchildren Since women were expected to adhere to near Victorian standards military leaders assumed a paternalistic attitude and the inevitable occurred grown women were often treated like school girls To prevent loneliness and avoid unfavorable comments no fewer than two WRs were assigned to a station enlisted women were not assigned to a post unless there was a woman officer in the vicinity and it was customary to assign women officers to units of twenty five

    Original URL path: http://www.womensmemorial.org/H&C/History/wwii%28mcwr%29.html (2016-02-09)
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