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  • Yakama Nation Wildlife
    which all have an interest in weed control We also work in conjunction with other Tribal Nations and Universities The following projects are some of the main highlights that we work on throughout the year Satus Creek Yakima River Scotch Thistle Project Scotch thistle is a biennial plant that grows predominately in moist sites or drainages of dry locations We have been treating Scotch thistle for over 10 years and have been successful in those areas that have been treated with herbicides The plant produces upwards of 40 000 seeds per plant and those seeds can lay dormant yet remain viable in the soil for over 20 years If left unchecked it will produce enormous monocultures and like most invasive plants will out compete native flora Naches River Japanese Knotweed Project Japanese knotweed is a project was started in summer of 2005 in cooperation with the Yakima County Noxious Weed Board The plants are mostly isolated to the Naches River from the town of Naches downstream to the confluence with the Yakima River We have found other small scattered patches around the Reservation It is a very aggressive perennial plant that can completely take over a riparian area The species will even out compete bamboo in its native Asia We have noticed that beaver like to chew down the stalks to use in their dam building which is unfortunate because a one inch node of the stem can reproduce into another plant and expand into a new colony in a relatively short amount of time It is too early to tell what our control of this invasive will be but it is encouraging to know that we acted quickly before it could spread into other drainages Yakima River Purple Loosestrife Project Purple loosestrife is another aggressive aquatic perennial plant Each individual plant can produce 2 3 million seeds making it difficult to control Like all other control projects the key is to kill the plant before it can set seed We have been working with the Yakima County Noxious Weed Board for over 10 years on this project We have also released biological control agents insects that and really helping to curtail the plant s invasiveness likely preventing a much worse the infestation We are pretty encouraged with what we have seen so far Yakima Reservation Forest Tree Planting Spraying Project Tree planting spraying project has been a cooperative operation that we have worked on since the late 1990 s The Forest Development program plants small tree seedlings in timber sales that have been recently harvested The main tree species that are planted include ponderosa pine douglas fir and western larch Lodgepole pine and engelmann spruce are also planted at a much lesser extent Immediately after the seedlings are in the ground our crew sprays an herbicide over the trees in small circular radius The herbicide is not harmful to the seedlings but it kills the surrounding vegetation which helps to eliminate the competition Once the competition is reduced the

    Original URL path: http://www.ynwildlife.org/invasiveplantprogram.php (2016-02-09)
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  • Yakama Nation Wildlife
    tells of the cultural and traditonal value this prized animal has among the Yakama People Revered for its endurance and strength the horse has become a symbol of the true Yakama Spirit and strength that survived the most difficult times over the last 200 years Today the horse remains at the same status and is often a prized possession with most tribal members who remember the days when horse chasing and catching was an art itself Used for various activities such as berry and root gathering to rodeos the wild horse made a way for the Yakama people and continues today to survive in the utmost of harsh climate conditions Most agree that the wildhorse is here to stay and to the appreciation of its Yakama Tribal members will remain so for many generations to come Current Management of Wild Horses At the present time 2010 there are believed to be over 12 000 wild horses on the reservation A comprehensive management plan has been developed but because of budget constraints and poor markets for horses only limited management is possible However approximately 500 horses have been captured by the program in the last 5 years Purchase Wild Horses From

    Original URL path: http://www.ynwildlife.org/wildhorseprogram.php (2016-02-09)
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  • Yakama Nation Wildlife

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    Original URL path: /Wildhorsecoalition.php (2016-02-09)


  • Yakama Nation Wildlife
    began with an individual tribal member who purchased and raised 12 of the bison Upon his retirement the tribe offered and purchased the animals and the rest is history Today the herd has grown from the original 12 to over 125 Through the efforts of dedicated tribal members and with funding by the Intertribal Bison Cooperative of Rapid City South Dakota the bison is here to stay The herd is now under the management of the Yakama Nation Wildlife Range Vegetation Program transferred from under the direction of the YN Cultural Heritage Center in 1996 The Bison Project has over 150 acres of land to manage the herd utilizes over 150 tons of winter feed per year and produces 25 30 young calves every spring Cultural Significance Culturally the bison plays a big role in the history of the Yakama People Yakama legends depict the departure of this magnificent animal and its long awaited return The bison was used in a ceremonial way to honor warriors of the tribe Revered for its strength and endurance the animal was one of the symbols of manhood and represented the Warriors of the Tribe through ceremonial events such as the Soup Dance It was also a prized item for health benefits it gave to our people that prevented many of the foreign diseases brought here from abroad Today this knowledge is being reinforced through scientific studies that conclude bison meat is an excellent alternative to red meat for diabetics and heart patients Native peoples have always known this and today are trying very hard to bring back the bison for our people More so there are over 150 uses of one single bison from medicines to ornamental items Purchasing Buffalo Meat Buffalo meat can be purchased by both tribal members and the general

    Original URL path: http://www.ynwildlife.org/buffaloprogram.php (2016-02-09)
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  • Yakama Nation Wildlife
    species BEARS Bears often cause problems when becoming habituated to places where people live Conflicts often occur when bears find food in the form of poorly maintained trash dumpsters Problem bears can be trapped and released away from human development Most of the time bears and humans can live harmoniously For information on bears and tips on avoiding conflicts click here Video of Bear Release COUGARS Cougars can be found near human establishments especially during droughts Bobcat prints and scat are often mistaken for cougar If you suspect you have seen a cougar in the lower valley of the Yakama Reservation please contact Don see above BEAVERS Beavers are an important component of healthy watersheds heavily influencing the morphology and function of wetlands Beaver dams and other structures improve water quality and provide refuge for juvenile fish Still they can create undesirable conditions when present near human development such as irrigation canals and road systems Manipulation of dams and culverts can help make it possible for coexistence to occur but when removal of beaver is unavoidable our program does offer trapping services on tribal land These services are currently available for tribal and non tribal public Currently our program is

    Original URL path: http://www.ynwildlife.org/nuisanceanimalprogram.php (2016-02-09)
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  • Yakama Nation Wildlife
    cultural and outdoor experiences For more information or application materials click here Summer Youth Employment Opportunities Summer youth employment is available throughout the Yakama Nation Department of Natural Resources Priority goes to Yakama enrolled low income high school students To enquire about this opportunity please contactthe Native Workforce Development Program at 509 865 5121 x4473 or 4474 Scholarships For Native Americans For a list of links to information on scholarships and other educational assistance for Native Americans click here SMDEP Summer Medical and Dental Enrichment Program 2008 The University of Washington hosts this summer enrichment program for freshman and sophmore college students interested in careers in the medical and dental field Students coming from underrepresented backgrounds are encouraged to apply For more information go to http depts washington edu omca UDOC Project HOPE Held at the Washngton State University this program is offered to high school students interested in the health care profession The Department of Health is working to create greater interest among a diverse group students to potentially choose a health care profession as a long term career This experience will serve to expose students to the many many health occupations that make up the health care industry

    Original URL path: http://www.ynwildlife.org/youtheducation.php (2016-02-09)
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  • Yakama Nation Wildlife
    eagle parts for religious purposes You must show a certification of your enrollment in a federally recognized indian tribe and send in an application For a good starting point click here Hunting Information For Tribal Members Special Hunting Permits Permits can be obtained for hunting in restricted areas and for wild horse chasing from our program These permits are for enrolled tribal members only Call Sandra at 509 865 5121 x6307 for more information Chronic Wasting Disease CWD Our program is currently monitoring for CWD a brain disease in deer and elk For more information on how you can help click here For more information on CWD click here Black Tailed Deer Hair Loss Syndrome HLS Hair loss syndrome is a serious and fatal disease in Columbia black tailed deer Although it has not yet been reported east of the Cascades it has the potential of being spread to Mule deer and will likely occur here soon Please report any sightings of this disease to our office or bring in suspect specimens For a printable brochure on HLS click here Also check out the following links Journal of Wildlife Diseases Downloadable Article Washington State Department of Fish Wildlife Fact Sheet

    Original URL path: http://www.ynwildlife.org/tribalmembers.php (2016-02-09)
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  • Yakama Nation Wildlife

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    Original URL path: /Recreation.php (2016-02-09)




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